Date   

Re: New Horse Hoof question

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Kamdace,

You need to create a signature on each individual group as they don't carry over.

Here's the link to your member page for this group:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/Hoof/member/11265764

Scroll down to the signature box, add your name, year of joining and general location, then scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Re: Best painkiller for stiffness/trimming

Josephine Trott
 

HI Amy

You could try using Previcox/Equioxx instead. They’re the same compound as each other and less inclined to give horses stomach ulcers compared with bute. Previcox is the dog version and much cheaper than equinox for the same amount of active compound but some horse vets won’t prescribe you the dog version

Josie
Davis CA 11/09


Re: Online trimming course certificate

 

I just saw you are in spain.  There is a PHCP person there.  Not sure where he lives.

--
Diann Kuzma
One Hoof at a Time
PHCP Practitioner
Joined 2018


Re: Online trimming course certificate

 

PHCP is a great on line group.  There  are required courses to  take that you have to go to. Like disection, anatomy and mentorships, to name a few. It is a great resourse for learning!  Everyone in the group will help a new comer.  We love to teach and help owners.  It does not matter if you want to just trim your own or start a business.  We are there to help you.
--
Diann Kuzma
One Hoof at a Time
PHCP Practitioner
Joined 2018


Re: New Horse Hoof question

Kandace Krause
 

Thanks Sherry,
This horse has not been out of the ring, unfortunately.  She is coming 7 and spent 2 and 3 Y.O. as a halter horse.  Was only backed in the last year.  Obviously, we have many many miles to make before she could compete in a 50 as her entire body will need conditioning.  She would also be being moved from a life at sea level to a 4500' elevation mountain home.

I have now seen the x-rays and the difference is substantial, I will see if veterinarian will grade it, as per the information provided by Jean, above.  I think that this may be more than mild.

As, a matter of house keeping, I see my signature is not linked, as in other groups, is this normal?

Kandace


Best painkiller for stiffness/trimming

amy in VA
 

Hi
My 30 year old mare, PPID not IR,
is stiff behind when trimming. Other than bute is there a short acting pain/inflammation remedy that works for this?
Thanks
Amy in Va
2005


Online trimming course certificate

Maria Duran
 

Hi all,

Just wondering if from all the online trimming courses available, you know one that provides a certification.

Thank you very much in advance.

Maria Duran.
Madrid, Spain.


Re: New Horse Hoof question

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kandace,

How sound a clubfooted horse will be is determined by a bunch of factors, but let's start with 'what are you planning on doing with this horse? How old is it?  What is it doing now?'  There are horses doing endurance with all sorts of leg issues so if this horse has already been doing endurance with no issues I'd be less worried than if it was something that'd never been out of a ring and you were looking to do 50s with it. 
--
Sherry and Scutch (and Scarlet over the bridge)
EC Primary Response 
PA 2014
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sherry%20and%20Scutch_Scarlet 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78891


Re: New Horse Hoof question

Jean
 

A club foot is an upright foot caused by a shortening of the tendon and muscle of deep digital flexor unit. The excessive pull on the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) turns the coffin bone downward, loading shifts to the toe area, and the hoof changes shape in response. The classic club foot is upright and contracted, and there may be a fullness in the coronet area due to the forward displacement of the extensor process of the coffin bone and the second phalanx just above it. The hoof wall may show rippling and dishing in the front, and wider growth rings in the heels. However, club feet can vary quite a bit in appearance, and what they look like depends in part on the severity of the problem, and to a degree on the quality and timing of the hoof care they receive. Club feet are graded on a scale of 1-4, with 1 being a mild case that may be hardly noticeable, and 4 being severe.

Regarding the prospect you are considering, if his feet look healthy overall, he is sound, and there is not much visible difference between the club foot and his other feet, it is likely a low-grade club, which is not typically a major concern. In fact, many low-grade club feet are healthy and very functional. Higher grade cases may have limitations in terms of their ability to perform and to remain sound, but the majority of horses with lower grade club feet are able to lead quite normal lives with appropriate hoof care, and owners of grade 1 horses may not even realize that their horse has a club foot at all. Some horses with club feet have even been successful in high level competition.

Unfortunately, anyone who owns a club-footed horse needs to know that it is very easy for a hoof care provider to make a club foot worse with what might seem like the most logical thing to do – lowering the heels. While lowering the heels might indeed be called for, it has to be done with extreme care and with full understanding of the physiology and biomechanics of the structures involved. Far too often, well-meaning farriers will lower the heels too much, too soon, or without taking other critical measures (such as moving back the most forward point of ground contact, known as the “point of breakover”), the result being that they cause the deep digital flexor apparatus to tighten more in response to the increased tension placed on it by the “missing” heel, and the foot may get tipped further forward as a result. It is also important to understand that when a horse has a club foot, one or more of the other feet often develop low hoof angles due to compensation, and those feet may have more issues than the club foot.

As for how club feet get to be that way in the first place, there are several possibilities. Some cases likely have a genetic component, as certain bloodlines seem to produce more individuals with club feet than is typical. Most club feet start very early in the horse’s life, either as a congenital limb deformity already present at birth, or as an apparently acquired limb deformity that develops as a result of the foal’s tendons and bones growing out of sync. However, it is possible that some of the supposedly acquired cases already had the problem brewing when they were born, and it simply went unrecognized or was not manifesting observable signs at that time.

Many experts now believe there may also be a nutritional factor in some cases of club foot, citing overfeeding of nutrients and excessive caloric intake as the root problem. The thinking is that the too-rich diet causes developmental orthopedic disorders (DOD), and the pain from these problems leads to abnormal loading of one or more limbs, which then gets the club foot ball rolling. Adult horses can also develop a club foot as a result of pain or injury that causes alterations in the loading patterns on their feet.

 

If your prospect has a mild club foot that does not appear to be getting worse over time, it would something to be aware of and keep an eye on, but it is not necessarily a deal-breaker. A competent hoof care provider will know how to manage such a foot – most often by simply keeping the feet balanced individually and not worrying about trying to “fix” the club foot or make it match the one on the other side. 

--
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jean%20and%20Merlin
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=273256


New Horse Hoof question

Kandace Krause
 

Morning,
I am looking at purchasing a new horse.  The vet who did her Pre-purchase exam told me she had a club foot, he took rads of it and her other "normal" foot.

I have only seen the bad one as a text photo but have asked for email copies AND his opinion on consequences to this specific horse and confirmation.  Too me it looks long toed and high heeled, as does my farrier, who said it looked like 56 degree coffin bone (means nothing to me, at this point) and I am wondering if this group can offer direction on going forward with this purchase and maintenance.  My IR horse foundered and original diagnosis (with rads) was road founder because of poor trim/shoeing, but subsequent blood work showed insulin resistance and PPID, so while a factor not the only cause.

Sorry, I am going to have to look up how to attach my signature to this group?

Kandace
Rocky Mountains Alberta


Re: Angle grinders

Diane Ogle
 

I use a Makita GA4534.  It's corded, which makes it lighter than a battery model, and is not a problem for me as I do mostly my own horses now.  Amazon says I've had it for 12 years!  Has a pretty narrow barrel, so I can hold on to it.  I wear tight fitting (no wiggle or slipping) good gripping gloves.  Of course I have arthritic hands and they're not bothered by the little vibration of the grinder. Phil Morarre has a good instructional DVD with great pointers.  Using flap discs is really recommended as it keeps from creating a hot flat spot on the hoof with the grinder.  Everyone here has great ideas!
Diane Ogle
Fort Bragg, CA
Ayla and Blue, IR and PPID
Molly, Rowdy and Mango, Over the Bridge


Re: Angle grinders

 

Ooh. The Proxxon is 1.8 pounds. Looks light weight. Something about the vibration in tools sets off my arthritic hands. Bet it doesn’t feel great on arthritic horse joints, either. 
--
Cass, Sonoma Co., CA 2012
ECIR Group Moderator
Cayuse Case History                Cayuse Photos
Diamond Case History              Diamond Photos 


Re: Angle grinders

Diane Ogle
 

I would add to make sure the grinder has a paddle switch, which automatically shuts off the grinder if you accidentally drop it.  It can happen.  And TIE UP THE TAIL.  I forgot one time only.  The grinder wound up my mare's tail and slammed into the side of my face.  My beloved girl just stood there, but I headed for the bag of frozen peas.  Lovely shiner, but it could have been way worse.  Otherwise, great tool to be able to use.  Practice on a block of wood first.  When I was still working as a professional trimmer, I never had one client that didn't get used to it and usually prefer it.  Especially the older ones with sensitive joints.  Less rocking back and forth than with a rasp.  
Diane Ogle
Fort Bragg, CA
Ayla and Blue, IR and PPID
Molly, Rowdy and Mango Over the Bridge
Feb 2011


Re: Angle grinders

Maxine McArthur
 

I found the usual 18v angle grinders too heavy for me to use with one hand, so I bought a little Proxxon long-neck angle grinder (10.8v battery). It weighs only 550g. I don’t have mains power so I have to use a battery-operated tool, and so far this one has lasted well just for my two horses—although I mainly use it for the final bevel, as I’m not that proficient yet. 

I tie up tails, wear gloves and eye protection and a mask, and keep the disk moving around the hoof. 


--
Maxine and Indy (PPID) and Dangles (PPID)

Canberra, Australia 2010

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Maxine%20and%20Indy 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Maxine%20and%20Indy/Dangles%20case%20history
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=933


Re: Angle grinders

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

To add to Diane's good advice, make sure you braid/knot/tie up the tail any time you use a grinder. One swish at the wrong moment and you will have a train wreck. Also need to be aware that it will remove a lot of material very quickly - which is both a plus and a minus. You need to touch lightly and move around so as not to take too much off any one spot at a time. Also be aware that the foot heats up under the sanding disc, so don't remain in one spot for long periods.

Definitely practice on a piece of wood with whichever grinder you choose so you get a feel for how it operates.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Re: Angle grinders

 

Any brand will do.  Take off the second handle and the blade guard.  Using this power tool is great!  BUT very dangerous.  Since i dont know you or your physical status, Please make sure you can handle, literally, handle holding and using this tool with 1 hand.  It is better to train yourself to use both left and right hands.  You will need to use both to get into certain spots.  Always wear heavy duty gloves.  Get your equine use to the sound way before using it on them. When you start to use grinder on hoof, just gentaly touch the bottom of the hoof.  They need to get use to the vibrations.  Most horses get use to the feel quickly.  It is the noise that some will not tolerate.
 
There is also a smaller 2" tool called Hoof Boss.  This is smaller, quieter and easier to use.  Unfortunately it is expensive.  I use the red disk.

To get use to the feel and how to use the 4" angle grinder, try it on a block of wood first.
--
Diann Kuzma
One Hoof at a Time
PHCP Practitioner
Joined 2018


Re: Angle grinders

Lorismorgans
 

I usa a battery op. Dewalt grinder.it is heavier than cored, but the convenience is worth it for me. Also use a battery op. Dremel..
They have been a life saver for me and my 3 boys. Just backing up the toes and quarters on a regular basis has so improved my boys feet.
Vet even wanted to know who was maintaining their feet because they looked so much better.
I am a senior, some weeks I can only do half a horse a day. But not having the anxiety about the farrier trimming to much off, or getting peeved with me makes the work worth it.
God bless Lavinia and the rest of you that give advice and pics to help us help our horses.

--
Lori's  Morgans
Northern Calif.
2017


Angle grinders

Jean
 


Trimming

Jean
 

I have taken on the trimming aspect of Merlin's feet since the two failed farrier attempts. 
I have only be doing rasping and taking back the toes, mostly on his fronts and reducing the flaring. 
however, I am not certain as to how much more and where on the hoof he needs trimming. 


Re: Navicular comfort

Shera Felde
 

Thank you, Allison, I just joined! We have all the time in the world, just want to get it right!

thanks again,
--
Shera Felde
Sisters, Oregon
2018

101 - 120 of 11625