High / Low


Maria Duran
 

Hi!

Is it fine to trim the heels at different heights when one front hoof is high and the other one low? Is it correct in order to have the HPA aligned to leave the low hoof with higher heels than the high hoof provided to toe is short enough for the internal structures? Is there any risk to produce and imbalance between both front hooves? Do I have to watch for something like knees being at the same height or anything?

Thank you very much.

María Durán.
Madrid, Spain.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

You trim each foot to be what is best for that foot - not to match any other foot. Over time, in the vast majority of horses, you likely find that when each foot is trimmed for what it needs, they will end up being very similar (barring major conformational issues).

Also need to actually parse out what is truly conformational and what is pathological/adapted to the pathology. Many times, things that are considered to be conformational are not.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Maria Duran
 

Thanks a lot Lavinia, that was my understanding but wasn´t 100% sure. 

How do you know whether it is conformational or not? 

María.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

To parse out conformation vs. compensation/pathology, you need to do more than a cursory exam of the horse. A thorough chiropractic work-up, including the sesamoids; have a thorough exam done by a qualified rehab specialist who is trained in structural balancing, equine sports massage, craniosacral therapy.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Maria Duran
 

Thank you Lavinia, sounds quite difficult .

María.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 
Edited

Being thorough is never as simple as making assumptions.

As an example, I've personally witnessed the difference a good rehab specialist can make: a horse presented at a trimming clinic was seriously toed in. The trim was done to work with this "conformational" issue. Afterwards, a rehab specialist who was in attendance did some work on the animal as well. In literally only minute - which is what it took to unlock the sesamoids - the horse went from being toed in to straight - which then meant the trim had to be corrected, as it was now forcing the horse into a stance that wasn't actually his.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Maria Duran
 

That's amazing Lavinia. Thanks for sharing it. This only reveals how little we know about horses and the importance of being close to knowledge people.

Did you have a chance to look at Repeat's case?

María.