Hoof photos for Red. Hoof wall is "peeling"!!


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Agree that the trimming/shoeing has likely been a major contributor to the problems in these feet. The issues are fairly common in OTTB horses. Agree that more frequent trims are definitely the way to go when rehabbing.

Based on the radiographs, he is definitely high-low, with good RF bony column alignment and no excess heel height in evidence. The coffin bone has a nice palmer angle.  It's the LF that is more problematic trim-wise as it has a broken back HPA and ground-parallel coffin bone. As there are no pix of the soles, it's impossible to say anything about what may be happening there.

A Sweeney shoulder is caused by damage to the suprascapular nerve, which runs over the front part of the scapula and provides the nerve supply to two major muscles that support the shoulder joint. When the nerve is injured, these muscles are unable to function normally and will undergo atrophy, which can occur very rapidly. The condition can be chronic or acute. Due to the muscle atrophy, it causes the shoulder to partially dislocate to the outside when the horse weights the leg. The chronic form was common when horses were used extensively for pulling. Now, it is more likely to be caused by a kick form another horse or impact of the point of the shoulder with an immovable object when the horse is in motion - think tree or post. A horse with the condition is unusable until the damage heals, which can take 6-8 months on average.

Overstretching of the DDFT is most likely to lead to tearing/rupturing of the tendon itself. Differences in the muscling of the shoulders of club footed horses is largely due to the differences in way the horse weights each limb and the way each limb is used rather than from damage to the nerves.

Really need to see a full set of labeled hoof pix - with true laterals/dorsals/sole and sole plane shots -  to be able to make a more thorough assessment.

Sorry, attachments aren't supported here - need to put any photos into an album.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Sherlene Turner
 

Hi Emma,
Don't worry too much about the poor hoof quality at this stage.  Just keep the rough edges and leverage off.  Though the feet aren't labelled, I'm assuming they are fronts.  You might have a high/low issue, but I don't think so.  It seems just like your horse has one bound foot in the form of a club hoof.  It appears to be clubby due to being bound in the shoe I expect.  Many club hooves are created by metal peripheral shoes in my experience.  There are genetic cases, but I definitely think it is worth a try to rehab this hoof.    You can see by the compression lines where the pressure is located.  The hairline also dips in the middle with pillars jammed.  Some photos of the palmar /behind view to check the heels would help if possible. I have an arabian with hooves that were very bound after being put in shoes and his heels look similar and I am trimming him the same way to cause the internal foot to move back - to unjam.  I would take pressure off the pillars and quarters alternatively at each trim and would be taking off some of the bars that are digging into the sensitive sole.  Read the pressure lines on the hoof wall and take down the corresponding areas of the hoof and give the bars room to come down as the internal foot unjams. Sometimes it will be pillars and sometimes quarters as the internal foot moves back. Don't remove any heel despite that being the very thing that farriers do with a clubby hoof.  That heel height is to protect the DDFT from being overstretched and forming a sweeny shoulder.  When you relieve the pressure on the internal foot and thus on the DDFT, that heel will wear away without any problems.  

I rehabbed a clubby footed OTTB successfully over 9 months with fortnightly trims.  This mare was fast but had been 'retired' from racing and I expect it was from the club foot pain.  The mare was currently being used for pony club activities but she could not continue to jump after the 2nd round of show-jumping due to pain in her club hoof and shoulder.  I was able to successfully rehab the club foot and the mare was then able to regularly compete in show-jumping without any issues. She competed barefoot too.  I'm not boasting here.  I'm just trying to help you help your horse.  Photo attached of the mare whose club foot I rehabbed.

I hope this helps.

Sherlene 
Klemens


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 9:51 AM <emmapote@...> wrote:
I'd appreciate thoughts on what is happening to Red's feet. He has been barefoot now for about 2 months (was shod all around). He had severe hoof inflammation following a short trim a couple weeks after going barefoot but has made good progress. He went outside for a short while today in a small paddock with not too hard footing but stomping at flies. His feet were very broken up when he came in as though the hoof wall is peeling off the foot. He seems to be walking okay but obviously I am concerned. 

Here is the link: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=247734

Emma Pote 
Ontario Canada
2020


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Sherlene Klemens
Bundaberg, Qld, Australia
joined 2012


emmapote@...
 

I'd appreciate thoughts on what is happening to Red's feet. He has been barefoot now for about 2 months (was shod all around). He had severe hoof inflammation following a short trim a couple weeks after going barefoot but has made good progress. He went outside for a short while today in a small paddock with not too hard footing but stomping at flies. His feet were very broken up when he came in as though the hoof wall is peeling off the foot. He seems to be walking okay but obviously I am concerned. 

Here is the link: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=247734

Emma Pote 
Ontario Canada
2020