Crena


Maria Duran
 

Thank you very much Lavinia, it matches the situation I believe because the last one I have seen and because I finally asked about this after seing it in lots of horses is one with a bit of club foot conformation and high heels.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

That was a great view of a Crena from an actual foot.

Ideally, the healthy, strong coffin bone has a smooth, solid distal edge. When the bone becomes porous, demineralized, mechanically damaged, that changes the integrity of the leading edge along with the sole/laminar connections that meet along it's perimeter. Horses that consistently land toe-first (much too common today) will inevitably damage the leading edge of the coffin bone over time, leading to more obvious signs of that accruing damage at ground level.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Maria Duran
 

Thank you Lavinia, I believe this is what you are describing right?

https://youtu.be/T0URb6PRHDI

And what's the reason for this kind of shape? Does it have something to do with any pathology?

Thanks a lot.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

The white line is created where the lamina of the wall meet and intertwine with the sole at the very bottom edge of the coffin bone, then this seam continues on down to the ground. It is formed in the shape of the coffin bone's distal edge.

The crena is due to the sole following the outline of the bottom edge of the coffin bone. If you look at radiographs of these feet, you will see some degree of indentation along the margin of the CB that aligns with the location of the crena at ground level.

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Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Maria Duran
 

Hi all, 

Does anyone know what is the real cause of crena in the sole?

I have tried to search for it but there are different opinions about it. When I look at sole's crenas it looks like there is stretched while line underneath but not sure about it.

Thank you very much.

María Durán.