New Horse Hoof question


Kandace Krause
 

If I didn't already, thank you Jean.
This response of yours gave me the right questions to ask of the vet and helped me decide on how to proceed.
Kandace K

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Kandace K
Rocky Mountains Alberta


Kandace Krause
 

Thank you,
All the information plus a talk with the inspecting vet has decided me to pass on this opportunity.  But the knowledge is priceless going forward.

Kandace K

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Kandace K
Rocky Mountains Alberta


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 
Edited

In addition to the info that Jean provided, a club foot is a response to problems further up the leg. In order to attempt to normalize it, you need to find the underlying cause and correct that first. Just trimming the foot to "normal" proportions is not the answer.

It is also possible that the horse isn't actually club footed but has been trimmed into that hoof configuration. Many horses will develop slight differences in the feet, which may be from an injury or just postural differences. Those can be exacerbated by then trimming the slightly more upright foot into an even more upright stance, while allowing the opposite foot to become extremely low, wide and underrun. Each foot should be addressed to keep it as balanced as possible at all times.

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Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Kamdace,

You need to create a signature on each individual group as they don't carry over.

Here's the link to your member page for this group:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/Hoof/member/11265764

Scroll down to the signature box, add your name, year of joining and general location, then scroll to the bottom of the page and click Save.

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Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Kandace Krause
 

Thanks Sherry,
This horse has not been out of the ring, unfortunately.  She is coming 7 and spent 2 and 3 Y.O. as a halter horse.  Was only backed in the last year.  Obviously, we have many many miles to make before she could compete in a 50 as her entire body will need conditioning.  She would also be being moved from a life at sea level to a 4500' elevation mountain home.

I have now seen the x-rays and the difference is substantial, I will see if veterinarian will grade it, as per the information provided by Jean, above.  I think that this may be more than mild.

As, a matter of house keeping, I see my signature is not linked, as in other groups, is this normal?

Kandace


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kandace,

How sound a clubfooted horse will be is determined by a bunch of factors, but let's start with 'what are you planning on doing with this horse? How old is it?  What is it doing now?'  There are horses doing endurance with all sorts of leg issues so if this horse has already been doing endurance with no issues I'd be less worried than if it was something that'd never been out of a ring and you were looking to do 50s with it. 
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Sherry and Scutch (and Scarlet over the bridge)
EC Primary Response 
PA 2014
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sherry%20and%20Scutch_Scarlet 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78891


Jean
 

A club foot is an upright foot caused by a shortening of the tendon and muscle of deep digital flexor unit. The excessive pull on the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) turns the coffin bone downward, loading shifts to the toe area, and the hoof changes shape in response. The classic club foot is upright and contracted, and there may be a fullness in the coronet area due to the forward displacement of the extensor process of the coffin bone and the second phalanx just above it. The hoof wall may show rippling and dishing in the front, and wider growth rings in the heels. However, club feet can vary quite a bit in appearance, and what they look like depends in part on the severity of the problem, and to a degree on the quality and timing of the hoof care they receive. Club feet are graded on a scale of 1-4, with 1 being a mild case that may be hardly noticeable, and 4 being severe.

Regarding the prospect you are considering, if his feet look healthy overall, he is sound, and there is not much visible difference between the club foot and his other feet, it is likely a low-grade club, which is not typically a major concern. In fact, many low-grade club feet are healthy and very functional. Higher grade cases may have limitations in terms of their ability to perform and to remain sound, but the majority of horses with lower grade club feet are able to lead quite normal lives with appropriate hoof care, and owners of grade 1 horses may not even realize that their horse has a club foot at all. Some horses with club feet have even been successful in high level competition.

Unfortunately, anyone who owns a club-footed horse needs to know that it is very easy for a hoof care provider to make a club foot worse with what might seem like the most logical thing to do – lowering the heels. While lowering the heels might indeed be called for, it has to be done with extreme care and with full understanding of the physiology and biomechanics of the structures involved. Far too often, well-meaning farriers will lower the heels too much, too soon, or without taking other critical measures (such as moving back the most forward point of ground contact, known as the “point of breakover”), the result being that they cause the deep digital flexor apparatus to tighten more in response to the increased tension placed on it by the “missing” heel, and the foot may get tipped further forward as a result. It is also important to understand that when a horse has a club foot, one or more of the other feet often develop low hoof angles due to compensation, and those feet may have more issues than the club foot.

As for how club feet get to be that way in the first place, there are several possibilities. Some cases likely have a genetic component, as certain bloodlines seem to produce more individuals with club feet than is typical. Most club feet start very early in the horse’s life, either as a congenital limb deformity already present at birth, or as an apparently acquired limb deformity that develops as a result of the foal’s tendons and bones growing out of sync. However, it is possible that some of the supposedly acquired cases already had the problem brewing when they were born, and it simply went unrecognized or was not manifesting observable signs at that time.

Many experts now believe there may also be a nutritional factor in some cases of club foot, citing overfeeding of nutrients and excessive caloric intake as the root problem. The thinking is that the too-rich diet causes developmental orthopedic disorders (DOD), and the pain from these problems leads to abnormal loading of one or more limbs, which then gets the club foot ball rolling. Adult horses can also develop a club foot as a result of pain or injury that causes alterations in the loading patterns on their feet.

 

If your prospect has a mild club foot that does not appear to be getting worse over time, it would something to be aware of and keep an eye on, but it is not necessarily a deal-breaker. A competent hoof care provider will know how to manage such a foot – most often by simply keeping the feet balanced individually and not worrying about trying to “fix” the club foot or make it match the one on the other side. 

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https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jean%20and%20Merlin
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=273256


Kandace Krause
 

Morning,
I am looking at purchasing a new horse.  The vet who did her Pre-purchase exam told me she had a club foot, he took rads of it and her other "normal" foot.

I have only seen the bad one as a text photo but have asked for email copies AND his opinion on consequences to this specific horse and confirmation.  Too me it looks long toed and high heeled, as does my farrier, who said it looked like 56 degree coffin bone (means nothing to me, at this point) and I am wondering if this group can offer direction on going forward with this purchase and maintenance.  My IR horse foundered and original diagnosis (with rads) was road founder because of poor trim/shoeing, but subsequent blood work showed insulin resistance and PPID, so while a factor not the only cause.

Sorry, I am going to have to look up how to attach my signature to this group?

Kandace
Rocky Mountains Alberta