Hoof Wings and Equicast


Abby Nemec
 

J Amick wrote:

This is so frustrating, and expensive. I nearly went bankrupt to replace and re-glue those eponas. There just has to be some sort of boot that will meet my needs. I HATE steel shoes and those nails!!!!
Sounds to me like your horse is a good candidate for hoof casts. You can buy them by onesies or a box of 10 if you want to save a little. You can glue them on or not. You can put them over a shoe or alone (and they do make a decent substitute for boots all by themselves). I actually have a horse wearing the Easywalker shoes who's wearing a cast over one of them because she broke out the wall on one side & I wanted to hold the shoe on temporarily (she's been wearing it for almost 5 weeks).

I've used Equicast on dozens of horses by now - over and under shoes (over is great, no nails required), barefoot, one foot, fronts & hinds, temporary & long-term, glued & not-glued, on & on. This is without question THE most versatile, user-friendly hoof care product I've come across ever.

-Abby



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Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


J Amick
 

Pam Beall wrote:

Have you tried the Epics or bares? They stay put very well IME....
 
You can also 'foam on' your easyboots like endurance riders do and it will really make them stick no matter what your horse's gait.
 
PAM




I had just learned about the bares by Easy boot.   That was my next decision to
consider.    Haven't  seen much in way of folk's  opinion on these new boots.
Judy-PA


Pam Beall
 

Have you tried the Epics or bares? They stay put very well IME....
 
You can also 'foam on' your easyboots like endurance riders do and it will really make them stick no matter what your horse's gait.
 
PAM

-----Original Message-----
From: ECHoof@... [mailto:ECHoof@...]On Behalf Of J Amick
Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2007 11:54 AM
To: ECHoof@...
Subject: Re: [ECHoof] Hoof Wings and Equicast

I really appreciate those that have shared their experiences about various boots,  shoes etc.
I have tried numerous pairs of boots,  and  none of which will stay put.    They usually start
spinning or turning on the foot.   Or they totally come off.

I've tried Cavallo's,  2 pairs of Old Macs,  Soft ride,  eponas glue on shoes,  and am sad to report
that none of these will work on my gelding that penetrated both front coffins bones last yr.    I've been told by 3 vets that this horse  can NOT   be left barefoot.   The reason being that the end of the coffin bones on both feet have a long  ski effect that is in the process of remolding.  We have alot of sole now but still have to have protection.      Since winter has set in and all I have is ice,  frozen mud,  snow  and cold temps,   I am fighting this decision of putting steel shoes on him again.    This is a gaited horse that gaits in the pasture and those items I mentioned,   simply will not stay on his feet! 

This is so frustrating,  and expensive.   I nearly went bankrupt  to replace  and re-glue those eponas.    There just has to be some sort of boot that will meet my needs.    I   HATE   steel shoes  and those nails!!!!

        Judy-PA




pegzak@... wrote:

Hi Judy,

I also had a set of Hoofwings made for my horse last year.  They were made from hoof tracings, and various measurements.  The set for the back feet never did fit very well for some reason, and I had trouble with the hoofwings turning/spinning on the hoof.








J Amick
 

I really appreciate those that have shared their experiences about various boots,  shoes etc.
I have tried numerous pairs of boots,  and  none of which will stay put.    They usually start
spinning or turning on the foot.   Or they totally come off.

I've tried Cavallo's,  2 pairs of Old Macs,  Soft ride,  eponas glue on shoes,  and am sad to report
that none of these will work on my gelding that penetrated both front coffins bones last yr.    I've been told by 3 vets that this horse  can NOT   be left barefoot.   The reason being that the end of the coffin bones on both feet have a long  ski effect that is in the process of remolding.  We have alot of sole now but still have to have protection.      Since winter has set in and all I have is ice,  frozen mud,  snow  and cold temps,   I am fighting this decision of putting steel shoes on him again.    This is a gaited horse that gaits in the pasture and those items I mentioned,   simply will not stay on his feet! 

This is so frustrating,  and expensive.   I nearly went bankrupt  to replace  and re-glue those eponas.    There just has to be some sort of boot that will meet my needs.    I   HATE   steel shoes  and those nails!!!!

        Judy-PA




pegzak@... wrote:

Hi Judy,

I also had a set of Hoofwings made for my horse last year.  They were made from hoof tracings, and various measurements.  The set for the back feet never did fit very well for some reason, and I had trouble with the hoofwings turning/spinning on the hoof.








pegzak
 

Hi Judy,

I also had a set of Hoofwings made for my horse last year.  They were made from hoof tracings, and various measurements.  The set for the back feet never did fit very well for some reason, and I had trouble with the hoofwings turning/spinning on the hoof.  The front set fit very well, however, and I still use these for exercising my horse. They are very hard inside, and I use them with homemade pads cut from anti-fatigue mat in order to deal with the "periferal loading" issue.  They are not really meant to be used with pads, and are harder to put on with pads. I also filed the toe to provide a better breakover. I have never used them for full time turnout, so I can't say whether these would rub if I left them on full time.  These fit very snug, and I think I would worry more about inhibiting circulation in the pastern area. 

I have had several different kinds of boots over the years, and they all seem to have their problems.  So frustrating.  Easy Care is going to be coming out with a new boot next year that promises to be very different, and of course a "better" boot. We'll see.

If you are looking for support and don't want to use a nail on shoe (or any shoe, if you are like me) then you might consider looking into the Equicast that Abby has mentioned on the main list.  I tried this, and rather liked it.  My farrier liked it so well, that she ordered about 15 of them for various clients.  I think this method has a lot of potential.  It costs 15 dollars per hoof.  I would suggest that you use the 2" width instead of the 3" width tape if you are doing it barefoot, instead of over shoes. Check it out at www.equicast.us  .  If you order it straight from the guy who makes it, he will include an instructional DVD for free.  I used it on one front foot of my horse, that was growing out a laminar wedge and becoming a bit tattered at the toe.  The Equicast provided very good protection. Also, you don't have any of the rubbing or spinning issues that you have with boots. You can also file and shape the casting material after it is set.

K.C. LaPierre has come out with a similar product recently. This material expands and contracts with the hoof, allowing proper hoof mechanics. He sells it in a kit for four hooves, that includes directions, glue, gloves, tape, == everything you need. (If you join 'The Perfect Hoof Club", you can get it at a special price for club members. ) I haven't tried his product yet, but will probably order it in January. It is call Perfect Hoof Wear. Check it out at www.equinepodiatry.net .

Best of luck to you!

Peg

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