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Alice's Justin


Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...>
 

http://pets.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/photos/browse/3d21

There is severe loss of joint space in the coffin joint on the left and
it's trying to fuse, but the I'd have to say the trim is actually
making things worse.

The bony column alignment (P1-P2-P3) is way off, severely broken back,
because the heels are too low. This may be causing navicular
bursa/navicular and/or DDFT pain as well. If you import these X-rays
into your own photo program and magnify them, you can clearly see that
the problem extends above the coffin joint. There is proliferative
change up the entire surface of P2, and the dorsal (front) edge of both
P2 and P1 show loss of bone density from the compression of the bones
along the dorsal surface that is caused by the low heels.

Compounding the problem is that the breakover is too far out in front
of the horse. As a rough rule of thumb, when there is normal sole depth
I like to see the most forward point of breakover being at a point in
front of the tip of P3 that is equal to the sole depth. I can't see the
hoof wall clearly right now (glare) so I'm not sure if the laminar zone
is thickened or not but if it is it could be making the white line
wider than normal and moving the hoof wall further away from P3 than
normal. Some trim "schools"/philosophies have an inviolable rule to
NEVER enter the white line but on pathological feet you absolutely have
to sometimes to get breakover back where it should be. At the very,
very, very least the toe should be rounded ("mustang roll"). Can't say
much else without actually see photos of the feet.

The same process is happening on the right side, just not as severe.
The heels are too low here too, but not the 0 to negative angle to P3
in the left foot. You can see the joint space is much wider at the
palmar side (toward the navicular bone) than it is dorsally. Cartilage
is probably still pretty good but there's loss of bone density at the
extensor process, proliferative change in the middle of P2 (high
ringbone), early loss of bone density on the dorsal surface at the top
odf P3. These heels can stand to come up just a bit too, and again the
toe is way too far out in front of him.

Eleanor