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Classy's hoof photos


Claire Vale <clairevale@...>
 

Hi Linda,

The photos you emailed me for uploading are now in the 'Linda's Classy'
folder - perhaps you could fill the group in on any pertinent
information?

The photos show that as well as the breakover point at the toe looking
like it is too far forward, the heels are also quite high and contracted
(nothing new to you, I guess <G>). This is common with foundered horses
- despite the rotation, they often end up toe walking because their
heels are actually more sore than the toe region, and so the heels grow
tall and contract. Once you manage to get the breakover point back,
then heels ought to start to come down and decontract on their own (the
sole will begin to shed out in the seat of corn, and you or your
farrier/trimmer can get them lower quite easily). How far they will
come down is hard to tell - because of the large degree of coffin bone
remodelling, her feet aren't ever going to look 'normal' again, and heel
height is often longer in feet like these.

Bringing the breakover point back on feet like these means either
leaving shoes off and starting the toe bevel back inside the edge of the
sole, or using shoes / boots / pads. I regularly use a bevel beginning
back in the sole edge (sometimes a long way back), and while none of the
horses I've worked on had feet quite like this I'm guessing there's no
reason why Classy couldn't be quite happy like that as well. Since the
breakover point has been extended so far forward for so long now, I'd
bring it back slowly over a period of several trims, to give her feet
time to adjust to the changing internal forces. The 'secret' with
adjusting the breakover point is to only remove length from the front of
the foot, and not to remove any height from the bottom (which would thin
the sole and bring the coffin bone closer to the ground).

As well as bringing the breakover point back, I'd give her a thorough
soaking treatment for thrush / fungus in her frogs. The deep
'butt-crack' groove in the centre of the frog indicates that not all is
as healthy as it ought to be (not really surprising with a metabolically
challenged horse <G>). I'd trim off all yucky bits of frog, so that
only nice healthy frog is left, then do a series of borax soaks as per
Marjorie's recommendations (http://www.barefoothorse.com/, then look
under More Topics).

I've added a marked up image of the latest right front x-ray. The
yellow outline is the approximate shape that the coffin bone 'should'
be, showing just how much remodelling has taken place. The red lines
are the alignment of the bones - you can see just how much rotation
there is in the PII - PIII joint, indicating that as well as being
foundered, Classy may well also have a club foot on the right front.

Hope this helps you some,

Claire Vale
New Zealand

-----Original Message-----
From: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ECHoof@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Linda Headley
Sent: Friday, 11 May 2007 2:48 p.m.
To: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ECHoof] Re: Classys x-rays from before her ddft was cut

Classy's shoes are off and we have trimmed the feet somewhat the way
it is suggested on the HopeforSoundness website under the part about
stewart clogs. I have pictures, but can't get them to download. Dr.
Kellon suggested these clogs, but we will have to see if our farrier
can put them on. If she works out barefoot, we will leave her that
way. I'll try again later to post the pictures.
Linda, Althea, Woodrow, Herbert, Classy, and Thumper


John Stewart
 

Hi Linda, (and Clare)

Thank you for providing photos with your previous x rays.
It is so much easier to give relevant comments on photographs taken at ground level ( camera on the ground from the same position x rays are taken) rather than if taken from a higher angle or not directly from the side.

I agree with Clare that the toe is too long. Clare has suggested bringing the toe/breakover back slowly, to give her feet time to adjust to the changing forces. I think that this can in fact be done quite quickly (providing, as she says, the height of the walls down the sides and the protection from the solar thickness is not removed) because there will be virtually no support being given by what is left of the dorsal (front) wall laminae. The effect of leaving it so long will be to maintain the potential levering forces that will pull the hoof away from the bone.

I also agree that the heels are too high. The angle of the coronet (on the side of the foot) to the ground gives a very good indication of the position and angle of the pedal bone, even if it is badly eroded. This can only really be judged from ground level, but it looks as though the right fore has a coronary band that is approaching being parallel to the ground. This means that the solar edge of the pedal bone will be about 25 degrees to the ground, and this will increase the forces down the front of the bone significantly.

I would be interested to know how Classy walks. Does she walk toe first, or does she walk obviously heel first?

I have a differnet opinion as to why the heels grow faster than the toe. I suggest it is the toe that grows slower than the heel because of the pressure on, and distortion of, the coronary papillae at the toe. This pressure is greater when the heel is high, and in the period between trims will become worse, day by day and week by week. I agree that the heel should be taken down.

Not that it really matters, but I think that Clare has exagerated the "original position of the coffin bone". The angle of the front edge has been taken from the extensor process, which we would not normally use, rather than the dorsal surface below it - which in this case is badly distorted or, in fact, non-existent.

Basically I am in agreement with Clare and the advice she has given.

John

----- Original Message -----
From: "Claire Vale" <clairevale@qss.co.nz>

Hi Linda,
The photos show that as well as the breakover point at the toe looking
like it is too far forward, the heels are also quite high and contracted
(nothing new to you, I guess <G>). This is common with foundered horses
- despite the rotation, they often end up toe walking because their
heels are actually more sore than the toe region, and so the heels grow
tall and contract. Once you manage to get the breakover point back,
then heels ought to start to come down and decontract on their own (the
sole will begin to shed out in the seat of corn, and you or your
farrier/trimmer can get them lower quite easily). How far they will
come down is hard to tell - because of the large degree of coffin bone
remodelling, her feet aren't ever going to look 'normal' again, and heel
height is often longer in feet like these.

Bringing the breakover point back on feet like these means either
leaving shoes off and starting the toe bevel back inside the edge of the
sole, or using shoes / boots / pads. I regularly use a bevel beginning
back in the sole edge (sometimes a long way back), Since the
breakover point has been extended so far forward for so long now, I'd
bring it back slowly over a period of several trims, to give her feet
time to adjust to the changing internal forces. The 'secret' with
adjusting the breakover point is to only remove length from the front of
the foot, and not to remove any height from the bottom (which would thin
the sole and bring the coffin bone closer to the ground).
I've added a marked up image of the latest right front x-ray. The
yellow outline is the approximate shape that the coffin bone 'should'
be, showing just how much remodelling has taken place.
Claire Vale
New Zealand


Linda Headley <hooves@...>
 

--- In ECHoof@yahoogroups.com, "John Stewart" <john_the_vet@...>
wrote:

Hi Linda, (and Clare)

Thank you for providing photos with your previous x rays.
It is so much easier to give relevant comments on photographs taken
at
ground level ( camera on the ground from the same position x rays
are taken)
rather than if taken from a higher angle or not directly from the
side.

Thanks to both of you for your comments. Classy walks heel first I
think, but will have to watch her again to be sure. My husband
trimmed her feet as per Claires' suggestions. The toes have been
shortened and the breakover was taken from the top of the hoof. He
knows to take nothing off of the soles. Her heels were lowered more
and her frogs were trimmed off. She is now wearing her soft-ride
boots. She has had several different kinds, but these are working
best for right now.

Funny thing is that we had her feet with the toes way back etc. but
the vet who cut her ddft thought they looked terrible and wanted them
to grow like a normal hoof. I'm pretty sure I know now that her feet
won't ever be normal and who cares? The vet taped redden ultimates
on her and her feet did start to look normal and her soles even
filled in for the first time. She could even stand normally on both
front feet after the tendon was cut. Problem was, as I see it, that
they put eggbar shoes on her without x-raying after the surgery and
that is where the problems began again.

We will keep working with her as she is bright-eyed and wants to
live. She had been lame for a year when I got her and that was over
a year ago, so I don't think she knows that she has a problem.
Linda, Althea, Woodrow, Herbert, Classy, and Thumper