Fw: Conan Hoof Discussion


5 Pine Ranch
 

Hoping for more response!  To update, we've really watched this guy as he's walked around his corral and he is landing toe first.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Amberlee
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2007 8:59 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Conan Hoof Discussion

I've uploaded a large number of photos into a Folder called Conan.  This is a 19 year old QH gelding we brought home 2 weeks ago.  He has been shown all over the place.  Complaints from his previous owner and farrier is that they could never get any heel on this horse, he was flat soled and prone to bruising and thrush.  He's lived in a stall most of his life.
 
We immediately noticed Grade 3 lameness in Left Front.  We had the veterinarian give him a quick glance and he encouraged us to correct his feet immediately.
 
He was a bit sore for about 24 hours after this process.  He is now still Grade 3 lame in front left (has improved slightly) - sound everywhere else.
 
After this initial visit Conan lifted his legs like a TWH in The Big Lick class!!  It was amazing to watch him for the first 15 minutes.
 
What I'd like to get around to discussing is what kinds of stresses will have been placed on the bones, joints, ligaments with feet like this - he's had the same farrier for over 10 years until he came here.  We plan to keep him resting in a corral for another month before pursuing diagnositcs on the Left Front.  I feel an increase in hoof temperature on the Inside of the Left Front compared to the rest - no pulses.
 
Amberlee
www.fivepineranch.com
Please Visit our Site!


Karen <karen@...>
 

Amberlee, I certainly am no expert, but I will tell you about Tilly
recently. As many know she foundered back in August 2004 and didn't
make any progress until spring of 2006 for lack of a trimmer that
could help her. We tried, but failed. He had been bringing her
along very slowly and her toes got ahead of us, she ran around to
much and rotated again in Fed. this year in her right front. So the
trimmer took her toes way back like they should have been and
started to aggressively bring her heels down. Within a couple
days Tilly started to tell us she was sore in the heel from doing
this because she started to walk on her right toe. I put a tiny
wedge under her heel that would flatten down within a couple days
and she walked great much better. I have been doing this now for
about a month and she is walking normal. Today no wedge under the
right heel.
Maybe he needs a little wedge under those heels to help him through
the transition.
This is what helped Tilly.
Karen, Chantilly and Tommi --- In ECHoof@..., Amberlee
<fivepineranch@...> wrote:

Hoping for more response! To update, we've really watched this
guy as he's walked around his corral and he is landing toe first.

----- Original Message -----
From: Amberlee
To: ECHoof@...
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2007 8:59 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Conan Hoof Discussion



I've uploaded a large number of photos into a Folder called
Conan. This is a 19 year old QH gelding we brought home 2 weeks
ago. He has been shown all over the place. Complaints from his
previous owner and farrier is that they could never get any heel on
this horse, he was flat soled and prone to bruising and thrush.
He's lived in a stall most of his life.

We immediately noticed Grade 3 lameness in Left Front. We had the
veterinarian give him a quick glance <not full exam> and he
encouraged us to correct his feet immediately.

He was a bit sore for about 24 hours after this process. He is
now still Grade 3 lame in front left (has improved slightly) - sound
everywhere else.

After this initial visit Conan lifted his legs like a TWH in The
Big Lick class!! It was amazing to watch him for the first 15
minutes.

What I'd like to get around to discussing is what kinds of
stresses will have been placed on the bones, joints, ligaments with
feet like this - he's had the same farrier for over 10 years until
he came here. We plan to keep him resting in a corral for another
month before pursuing diagnositcs on the Left Front. I feel an
increase in hoof temperature on the Inside of the Left Front
compared to the rest - no pulses.

Amberlee
www.fivepineranch.com
Please Visit our Site!


5 Pine Ranch
 

Thank you Karen, that is a good thought about the wedge!
 
Amberlee
www.fivepineranch.com
Please Visit our Site!


Claire Vale <clairevale@...>
 

Hi Amberlee,

I forgot to ask, was he landing heel first or flat before he was
shod?

Landing toe first suggests that his heels are sore, and I guess
that's not in the least bit surprising to you <G>. However, the
question becomes was he heel sore before shoeing or not (i.e. is he
now better / worse / different). Sometimes even ugly feet like
these are actually fairly functional for the horse, then we try to
correct the obvious issues and they seem to become less comfortable.

Is he any better with boots or pads? Does the environment (hard /
soft / flat / rough) make any difference?

Claire Vale
New Zealand


--- In ECHoof@..., Amberlee <fivepineranch@...> wrote:

Hoping for more response! To update, we've really watched this
guy as he's walked around his corral and he is landing toe first.

----- Original Message -----
From: Amberlee
To: ECHoof@...
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2007 8:59 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Conan Hoof Discussion



I've uploaded a large number of photos into a Folder called
Conan. This is a 19 year old QH gelding we brought home 2 weeks
ago. He has been shown all over the place. Complaints from his
previous owner and farrier is that they could never get any heel on
this horse, he was flat soled and prone to bruising and thrush.
He's lived in a stall most of his life.

We immediately noticed Grade 3 lameness in Left Front. We had the
veterinarian give him a quick glance <not full exam> and he
encouraged us to correct his feet immediately.

He was a bit sore for about 24 hours after this process. He is
now still Grade 3 lame in front left (has improved slightly) - sound
everywhere else.

After this initial visit Conan lifted his legs like a TWH in The
Big Lick class!! It was amazing to watch him for the first 15
minutes.

What I'd like to get around to discussing is what kinds of
stresses will have been placed on the bones, joints, ligaments with
feet like this - he's had the same farrier for over 10 years until
he came here. We plan to keep him resting in a corral for another
month before pursuing diagnositcs on the Left Front. I feel an
increase in hoof temperature on the Inside of the Left Front
compared to the rest - no pulses.

Amberlee
www.fivepineranch.com
Please Visit our Site!


5 Pine Ranch
 

Claire, he is "toe first landing" both before and after this recent farrier visit.  He came here in shoes and because of the current ground conditions in his corral, we opted to keep him in shoes.  There is no change in the degree of lameness
 
I did consider legs but checked him over very carefully.  Could find no heat, no tenderness, no edema and no issues either side with flexion.  However, prior to my farrier and for a few days after the work was done, there was a slight pulse in L Front and I felt there was an increase in heat on the inside wall of the sore foot.