Hoof trim examples somewhere?


talley_catherine@...
 

Hi Everyone,

Is there a video I can find somewhere that shows Bowker's approach to long toes / underrun heels? ie. Backing through the white line?

Can this be done when the soles are thin? Is this the only way to get the toe back or would weekly trims to the white line achieve the same?
What about the heels and heel flares? 

I have Pete Ramey's book and videos and have watched Dr Bowker in several interviews on the long toe, underrun heel but just would love to see a video of what it looks like to take the toe back through the white line. Thanks for any help,
Cathy


(Diet is good, just growing hoof out but need to improve sole depth and get toe back a bit more and develop caudal foot. Using boots and treating thrush but the conditions are very wet which is not helping much)
--
Cathy
Saskia (and 6 other horses!)

NSW, Australia
Joined Jan 2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=271799
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cathy%20and%20Saskia/Saskia_Case%20History_Jan%2021%202022.pdf

 


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

HI Cathy,

Yes, you can/need to back thru the white line in order to get better hoof dynamics, even when the sole is thin. If you don't go back thru where that line appears to be, you'll never actually move the breakover back to where the bony column needs it to be.

With thin soles, you may need to not back as far thru the "white line" at ground level at each trim - so doing less more frequently works really well.

The white line is a seam between the wall lamina and the sole that starts at the perimeter of the coffin bone, then grows down toward the ground. It stretches forward with the sole and wall as they move forward. When you back thru where it appears at ground level and then bevel the underside of the sole in the toe region at the new location, you'll find the white line behind the new location of the end of the toe. With thin soles, do NOT touch the soles behind the new toe length at all: even if they are lumpy or uneven, flaky, exfoliating just leave them that way as that horse needs every millimeter it has at that point in time. Sole depth doesn't necessarily increase evenly across it's entire surface - many times, it adds depth in the areas most critically in need of it, which can appear as thicker/lumpier areas.

You can add jiaogulan to help increase growth rate once the trim is correct.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


talley_catherine@...
 

Thanks, Lavinia. I took the toe back with the nippers and beveled to the white line (so not right through it because of the think sole) and the horses (I have 2 that I did today) ended up with the breakover just in front of the callus. Didn't take any sole. Visually that it took it back quite a way and appeared to also change the HPA for the better. They were a tiny bit sore so I put boots on them. (I have had farriers trimming them forever and they never got the toes back this far. Hence the issues I have had with pedal bone remodelling in one, and a mechanical laminitis in the other, plus low palmar/plantar angles)

I am unsure how often / much I need to do this? When do I know it is far enough? Do I aim for 50:50 balance of the foot? Should I re x-ray? We are in autumn now so hoof growth is slowing, plus it is very wet underfoot. Unsure when to add the jiaogulan?

I assume that this in itself will help increase the sole depth, although I have read that Pete Ramey says some horses will callus at about 12mm and that is "normal" for them? These two are about 12mm on xray, but that was also with too long toes so perhaps I will be able to get them improved from that. I am trying to get work boots for them so I can increase the exercise.

Thanks for your help.
--
Cathy
Saskia (and 6 other horses!)

NSW, Australia
Joined Jan 2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=271799
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cathy%20and%20Saskia/Saskia_Case%20History_Jan%2021%202022.pdf

 


Michele Einarson
 

My gelding's insulin is up again, so, fearing that his laminae is weakened, I sent this article to my trimmer prior to his trim last Tuesday.  I explained that I thought the photos looked extreme, but the diagrams made sense to me.  After his trim, my horse is dead lame.  I've put EasyBoot Clouds on him so he can move around his corral.  What next?  I'll get photos ASAP.
https://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/toe-rocker.html
--
Michele & Mosey
Feb 2019
Reno, NV, USA


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Michele,

Sorry to hear things didn't turn out as planned and that Mosey is so sore. Good idea to put padded boots on him as long as he's uncomfortable. The general ideas on the link are sound but how they are implemented can be problematic.

There could be a number of factors involved here but without pictures of the trim there's no way to make any specific comments. Some things to consider would be: was any sole and/or frog removed? were the bars heavily trimmed? were the heels lowered? Is he sore on all four feet or only some?

It's possible he had trapped collections inside that the trim is mobilizing = abscesses. These can more debilitating/painful than laminitis. His body may be needing to adapt to the new configuration of his feet, which can make the body sore as it uses itself in ways it hasn't done in a long time.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support