Horizontal Cracks


Chris Pennbo
 

Hello,  My Monte (28yr old) is on 2mg of Prascend daily.  When he came up to the barn a few days ago I noticed horizontal cracks on both front hooves. They are about 6 inches long, and run halfway between the ground and the band.  He is not lame at all. He had an abscess in each hoof this spring so I wondered if this was the result of them growing out. The vet said no. He said it is common for Cushings horses to have dried and cracked feet.  He would like us to start him on Platinum Performance Hoof Care. He also suggested boots until they grow out.  I am hesitant to start him on any supplements without checking in here first.

AND to make things worse our trimmer just retired unexpectedly and with no warning!

I'm looking for any suggestions or advice. Thanks in Advance.
Chris and Monte


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Chris,

Seeing some pix would be helpful but it sounds like you may be correct about the abscess exit points growing out. How deep are they?

Just because a horse has PPID doesn't mean it is going to have dried, cracked feet. Feet react to environment, diet, lifestyle and trimming practices. Because PPID horses tend to be older individuals, a lifetime of deficiencies and/or stress is catching up to them and uncontrolled PPID can become the "final straw" for their feet to really deteriorate. Or become the catalyst for someone finally noticing that the feet are having problems.

If your horse is on a mineral balanced diet, the Platinum Performance products aren't going to provide anything you don't already provide. If you read the analysis of the PP products, they don't provide enough of anything to supplement a flea, never mind a horse, and at a hefty cost.

Boots won't hurt anything but no need to use them unless he appears uncomfortable. As the cracks get closer to the ground, they may chip out a chunk of the walls, but usually this is only a cosmetic issue. Just keep the trim really tight to prevent any additional, unnecessary strain on the weakened areas. Obviously, that's now a head-ache with losing your trimmer unexpectedly.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Chris Pennbo
 

Thanks. I have pictures but I'm not sure how to post them.  I am concerned in part because their pasture is dry, bare, and has plenty of rocks. THis has never bothered him in the past. He has been barefoot most of his life on the same type of conditions and has always had really solid, good feet. He started with abscesses, usually one per front hoof, each winter for the past 3 years. (about the time he was diagnosed with PPID) These cracks are deeper than usual, go almost all the way across the hoof, and are relatively deep. I'll check tomorrow for an exact depth. My fear is he will go running with his buddies, step on a rock, and chip out a HUGE chunk of hoof.

Diet- I have not had his diet balanced correctly. He is on soaked Triple Crown Balanced Timothy Cubes, a small amount of soaked beet pulp, a small amount of alfalfa, APF,  Chastetree berry powder, Tri-Amino, and 2 tabs of Prascend daily.  We are hoping to get hay again soon so he can go back to eating hay. (the hay we have is too tough/rough and he doesn't have the jaw power to chew it enough to eat it. Thus the soaked cubes)

Chris and Monte


Shirley J.
 

Sorry if this is a dumb question, but how does one “keep the trim really tight”? 

I know that the trim is the secret to success…but I’m not a farrier.  I don’t know what to tell my farrier to do specifically.      

I have been following this thread because, while I’m having a slightly different issue, it’s pretty similar.

 

Thanks in advance for any input you can share!

 

Shirley J. – Michigan

Olaf – PPID

Member since 2020

Horsecrazy-2@...

 

From: Hoof@ECIR.groups.io <Hoof@ECIR.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lavinia Fiscaletti
Sent: Thursday, July 1, 2021 11:21 PM
To: Hoof@ECIR.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ECIR+Hoof] Horizontal Cracks

 

Hi Chris,

Seeing some pix would be helpful but it sounds like you may be correct about the abscess exit points growing out. How deep are they?

Just because a horse has PPID doesn't mean it is going to have dried, cracked feet. Feet react to environment, diet, lifestyle and trimming practices. Because PPID horses tend to be older individuals, a lifetime of deficiencies and/or stress is catching up to them and uncontrolled PPID can become the "final straw" for their feet to really deteriorate. Or become the catalyst for someone finally noticing that the feet are having problems.

If your horse is on a mineral balanced diet, the Platinum Performance products aren't going to provide anything you don't already provide. If you read the analysis of the PP products, they don't provide enough of anything to supplement a flea, never mind a horse, and at a hefty cost.

Boots won't hurt anything but no need to use them unless he appears uncomfortable. As the cracks get closer to the ground, they may chip out a chunk of the walls, but usually this is only a cosmetic issue. Just keep the trim really tight to prevent any additional, unnecessary strain on the weakened areas. Obviously, that's now a head-ache with losing your trimmer unexpectedly.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Chris, the TCTBC are already mineral-balanced.  You just need to add salt, vit E and ground flax seed.  Depending on how much beet pulp and alfalfa you are feeding, you might need to add a little more minerals.  If it's less than 0.5 lbs, I wouldn't bother.

Lavinia is the only one who can post photos in the Hoof sub-group so you'll have to email them to her, but if you have a photo album in the main ECIR Group you can post your photos there and provide a link in your response to Lavinia here.
Here are some instructions on how to make a photo album in the main ECIR Group, and how to upload photos to it:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/wiki/1474

--
Kirsten Rasmussen
Kitimat, BC, Canada


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Shirley, 

A "tight" trim conforms to the inner hoof structures (bones) so you can see when you have radiographs just how "tight" a trim is.  Lavinia can probably describe it better but when I think of a tight trim I'm picturing no flaring, short toes, and the hoof wall rolled so that outer wall from the quarters forwards doesn't contact the ground unless the hoof is fully weight-bearing or the ground is soft and the hoof sinks in.  In Chris's case it means not letting hoof walls, especially toes, get so long that they flare and put stress on the cracked areas causing them to break away completely.  It also requires rasping every 2-3 weeks.  If your farrier comes every 4-6 or more weeks the trim will not remain tight unless your horse gets a lot of barefoot miles and can self-trim, or you can rasp in between trims.  This can be compounded because many farriers don't trim to the internal structures to start with. 

--
Kirsten Rasmussen
Kitimat, BC, Canada


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Shirley,

Have you seen the replies you've gotten to your questions here and on the main ECIR group? If not, here are links to them:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/Hoof/topic/76794174#11328

https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/255921

I can help you with the specifics of what needs to happen for Olaf's trim but in order to do that, I need a full set of photos of all four feet so I can do a set of mark-ups for you. Here is the link to what is needed:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/wiki/1472

The photos can be uploaded to Olaf's Photo album here:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=254671
 
Please let us know if you are having trouble navigating or are getting stuck somewhere in the process.

--
Lavinia
Jan 2005, RI

Moderator/ECIR Support