Topics

Monty's trim


Collaeyn Hazen
 

Hi Lavinia,

I'm hoping you'll have a chance to do Monty's markups soon so I can get them to my farrier to "digest" before she is here on Friday.
Thank you!

--

Collaeyn and Monty
Sewell, NJ
June 2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Collaeyn%20and%20Monty
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=248978


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Collaeyn,

I did reply to you on the Main on ECIR Group, guess you just missed the message.

I will get those up before Friday's appointment.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Collaeyn Hazen
 


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Colleayn,

I've added mark-ups to Monty's album:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=248978

The radiographs confirm that you Monty has thin soles, long toes, underrun heels, flaring walls and some sinking. All of these are inter-related and are fixable. Goal heading forward is going to be to tighten up the trim to allow healthier growth to replace the damaged walls and connections. Having a tightly mineral balanced diet in place will provide Monty with the building blocks he needs to generate the healthier hoof.

LF dorsal: Blue lines follow the angle of the healthier growth from above toward the ground. Blue X's are the flared wall material that needs to be removed in the bottom 1/3 of the hoof. You can easily see where this is if you place the foot on a hoof stand then look down on it with your face as close to the leg as possible. The flaring will be obvious - bring the walls inward to match the angle from above. Finish it off with a bevel to keep the outer wall out of ground contact until the healthier connections have grown down to ground level.

LF lateral composite: On the radiograph, the pink line follows the angle of the bony column toward the ground. This line should actually extend further below the hoof but the rads were cut off right at the bottom of the foot. Red line indicates that NOTHING should be removed from the bottom of the foot as there is already too little there. Blue line is where the toe should be brought back to. Green line follows the angle of the new growth toward the ground. This isn't a trim line, just a visual marker - note that it runs parallel to the pink line. Yellow line 1 runs thru the coronary band. Yellow line 2 points to the extensor process. the distance between them denotes the amount of sinking as they should be located in the same place (or very close together).
On the photos, the green line is the same as the one on the rad. Blue area corresponds to the blue line and blue X's on the rad - which is the toe that needs to be removed/backed up. Orange line shows where the heels should be - which is a goal to aim for, not something you can trim the heels to immediately. Yellow line follows the coronary band: note how it arches upward, then curls down and forward as you move toward the heels. This is due to the heels running under and pulling the coronary band down/forward as well. Once the heels move back, the coronary band will relax into place as well.

LF sole: Blue line shows where the actual foot should be - with the walls tightly attached to the edge of the sole. Blue hashed areas are all the wall that is flared out and needs to be removed as it has no structural integrity. Leaving it in place only encourages more damage to occur. Orange circles are where the heel buttresses should be created once the flaring is removed. You want to preserve all the height that is there right now so just pas a rasp once lightly over that area to slightly flatten it. See this link for more specific info, esp. figures 2 and 3:

http://www.hoofrehab.com/HeelHeight.html

RF dorsal: Green lines follow the angle of the new growth down to the ground. Blue X's are the flared material that needs to be removed. The yellow lines follow a couple of the growth rings - note how they slope rather than being level, indicating medio-lateral imbalance.

RF lateral composite: Pink line shows how the bony column should align while the purple line follows the actual alignment. Note how the purple line dips back and down away from the pink line. This denotes that the HPA is broken back. The sinking, long toe and underrun heels are all contributing. Blue line is where the toe needs to be brought back to. Red line indicates that the bottom of the foot should NOT be touched as the sole is already too thin. Green line follows the angle of the new growth and is only a visual marker, not a trim line. It runs parallel to the pink line. Yellow line 1 runs thru the coronary band. Yellow line 2 points to the extensor process. The distance between them denotes the amount of sinking.
On the photo, Green line is the same as on the rad. Blue area corresponds to the blue X = toe that needs to be backed up. Orange line shows where the heels should be located. Yellow line follows the coronary band, just as on the LF.

RF sole: Same discussion as for the LF.

LH dorsal: Same as the fronts.

LH lateral: Same as the fronts.

LH sole: Same discussion as the front soles. Note that the medial heel is more flared, while on the fronts it was the lateral heels.

RH dorsal: Same as for the LH.

RH lateral: Same as for the LH.

LH sole: Same discussion as for the other soles.

Monty should remain in padded boots until he develops more sole depth and starts to develop some concavity.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Collaeyn Hazen
 

Hi Lavinia,
Thank you Thank you Thank you!  This is great to see visually what his feet *should* look like end-state,  and what is OK to remove.  I've lost so much riding/fun time with Monty with his feet issues, hopefully we can move past that with correct trimming.

I have Easyboot clouds for him to go into after today's trim, for extra support.

  1. Question for you - Up until now Monty has been in scoot boots, and since he had soreness in June, he has had Equine Fusion pads in them.  The Scoot boot tread has a lot of give under the center of the foot...I'm not sure if having more support around the perimeter of the hoof is contributing to the sinking in the middle? Or is the sinking more related purely to trim/hoof form? The scoots have been nice since they drain so well and he's been in them 24x7 (he lives out 95% of the time- only in for horrible weather).  I could try some form of Easyboot once he doesn't have the flared walls, they don't work with flares very well.   Hopefully someday he can be boot-free for turnout but I know we have a way to go.
  2. Second question - I was reading a lot of posts here re: Jiaogulan, and particularly an article by Dr. Kellon on the Uckele website.   My vet was here in June, he wanted Monty on isoxsuprine for increased blood flow to his feet. Is Jiaogulan something I should consider instead of isox?
  3. My other TB could use some help with his feet. They aren't as bad as Monty's but the heels are really... underdeveloped...? Can I request a trim eval for him? I would be happy to pay for an eval service.

    With sincere appreciation,

    Collaeyn and Monty
    Sewell, NJ
    June 2020
    https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Collaeyn%20and%20Monty
    https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=248978


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

You're welcome.

Use whatever boots fit him well and he is comfortable in. That will change over time, as will the pads that he finds most helpful. You want pads that will conform to all the nooks and crannies on the bottom of the feet so that all the weight bearing structures are engaged - not just the walls. This will distribute weight bearing across the entire bottom of the foot, engaging all the parts in cycles of pressure-and-release as the foot moves.

Isoxsuprine is poorly absorbed by horses when administered orally so is fairly useless. Jiaogulan actually works to increase nitric oxide production, so it increases circulation.For best results - feed on an empty stomach, twice daily. Dose is to effect. See the file on the main group:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/filessearch?q=jiaogulan

Sure, I can help you with your other boy as well. Just send me a PM.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support