Oh yeah - and the digital cushion


Vicki Kline <vlk@...>
 

I forget who mentioned the digital cushion in a post, but I've found
that can be the most difficult and painful part of rehab on horses that
toe walk - whether they've actually been diagnosed as navicular or
not.

Vicki (just throwing that out FWIW!)


Ute <ute@...>
 

But does toe walking not mean that the trim is not correct, as in heels too high?
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 6:47 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

I forget who mentioned the digital cushion in a post, but I've found
that can be the most difficult and painful part of rehab on horses that
toe walk - whether they've actually been diagnosed as navicular or
not.

Vicki (just throwing that out FWIW!)


Vicki Kline <vlk@...>
 

--- In ECHoof@..., "Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

But does toe walking not mean that the trim is not correct, as in
heels too high?

OK wasn't clear - on horses that USED TO toe walk prior to trim(s).
Still have to rehab that dc.


Claire Vale <clairevale@...>
 

Hi Ute,

 

Not necessarily.  Toe walking means that the hoof balance is incorrect, AND/OR the rear of the foot is sore.  In many cases, even once the mechanical balance is greatly improved, the damage in the caudal region is still present.  It’s the difference between INTERNAL and EXTERNAL health and mechanics.  Digital Cushion weakening can take YEARS to recover (as best as possible), and even with ‘good’ hoof balance the horse may continue to move toe first until the rear of the foot is strong enough to take some level of concussion.  If we can provide a level of comfort where the horse is able to use the heels at least a bit, then that strengthening may be speeded. 

 

And if the foot is shaped such that it is almost impossible to get correct balance by trimming alone, then by providing comfort (in the form of correctly used boots, or shoes, or casts, or whatever) so that the horse moves correctly and the foot starts to function better, we can kick-start the whole process. 

 

The key is to look at the individual case, assess what has worked or not so far, and then consider the various ‘tools’ you have available to help.  And be prepared to accept that you may not have appropriate tools (or perhaps the skill to use them correctly), and that it’s possible that others might.

 

Claire Vale

New Zealand

 

 

From: ECHoof@... [mailto:ECHoof@...] On Behalf Of Ute
Sent: Monday, 25 February 2008 5:56 a.m.
To: ECHoof@...
Subject: Re: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

 

But does toe walking not mean that the trim is not correct, as in heels too high?

 

 

BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Vicki Kline

Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 6:47 AM

Subject: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

 

I forget who mentioned the digital cushion in a post, but I've found
that can be the most difficult and painful part of rehab on horses that
toe walk - whether they've actually been diagnosed as navicular or
not.

Vicki (just throwing that out FWIW!)


Abby Nemec
 

Ute wrote:
But does toe walking not mean that the trim is not correct, as in heels too high?

Toe walking means the horse hurts. That's all.

How, where, why ... that's what the physical exam is for.

-Abby

--
**************************
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


Ute <ute@...>
 

That is correct, often thrush in deep frog clefts can be a problem as well. The flexor muscles should also be looked at , in case they are shorter than they should be, due to years of incorrect toe loading.
 
Ute
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 2:45 PM
Subject: RE: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

Hi Ute,

Not necessarily.  Toe walking means that the hoof balance is incorrect, AND/OR the rear of the foot is sore.  In many cases, even once the mechanical balance is greatly improved, the damage in the caudal region is still present.  It’s the difference between INTERNAL and EXTERNAL health and mechanics.  Digital Cushion weakening can take YEARS to recover (as best as possible), and even with ‘good’ hoof balance the horse may continue to move toe first until the rear of the foot is strong enough to take some level of concussion.  If we can provide a level of comfort where the horse is able to use the heels at least a bit, then that strengthening may be speeded. 

And if the foot is shaped such that it is almost impossible to get correct balance by trimming alone, then by providing comfort (in the form of correctly used boots, or shoes, or casts, or whatever) so that the horse moves correctly and the foot starts to function better, we can kick-start the whole process. 

The key is to look at the individual case, assess what has worked or not so far, and then consider the various ‘tools’ you have available to help.  And be prepared to accept that you may not have appropriate tools (or perhaps the skill to use them correctly), and that it’s possible that others might.

Claire Vale

New Zealand

From: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ECHoof@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ute
Sent: Monday, 25 February 2008 5:56 a.m.
To: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

But does toe walking not mean that the trim is not correct, as in heels too high?

BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer

----- Original Message -----

From: Vicki Kline

Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 6:47 AM

Subject: [ECHoof] Oh yeah - and the digital cushion

I forget who mentioned the digital cushion in a post, but I've found
that can be the most difficult and painful part of rehab on horses that
toe walk - whether they've actually been diagnosed as navicular or
not.

Vicki (just throwing that out FWIW!)