OT sort of Big Brown's hooves


Betsy
 

Hi all!

Since we had been discussing different techniques for helping stabilize
compromised hooves using epoxy and shoes, I want to reference this link
from Fran Jurga's site.

http://hoofcare.blogspot.com/2008/04/big-brown-most-famous-feet-in-
derby.html

I hope you see our own horse's compromised feet in a similar picture.
No, I'm not saying this will work for our laminitic horses but it seems
that the day may be nearing when we can do more for our horses.

Betsy and Annie (nearing the one year anniversary of her founder and
sound) in Ohio


Jenny Edwards <jaennyedwards@...>
 

I'm sorry but I disagree - I hope I never see a compromised hoof in a similar picture! This is another example of adding stuff to a hoof without addressing the underlying issues (look how the hoof is trying to grow in at a tighter angle from the top and how the flares are left on at the bottom - or is it just a REALLY bad picture?). See also the other horse that this same farrier worked on (a thin walled horse) to "rebuild" the heels - yet totally missing the fact that the foot was flared and the breakover was totally out of wack! I'm totally unimpressed if this is the best there is.

Jenny Edwards

- information on all aspects of natural horse care 

- graphic design solutions



On 7-May-08, at 10:58 AM, Betsy wrote:

Hi all!

Since we had been discussing different techniques for helping stabilize 
compromised hooves using epoxy and shoes, I want to reference this link 
from Fran Jurga's site.

http://hoofcare.blogspot.com/2008/04/big-brown-most-famous-feet-in-
derby.html

I hope you see our own horse's compromised feet in a similar picture. 
No, I'm not saying this will work for our laminitic horses but it seems 
that the day may be nearing when we can do more for our horses.

Betsy and Annie (nearing the one year anniversary of her founder and 
sound) in Ohio



Betsy
 

--- In ECHoof@..., "Betsy" <inhishandsstables@...> wrote:

Hi all!

Since we had been discussing different techniques for helping
stabilize
compromised hooves using epoxy and shoes, I want to reference this
link
from Fran Jurga's site.
Here is a video that more fully explains the what and why's of the
technique.

http://hoofcare.blogspot.com/2008/04/derby-update-video-of-
thoroughbred-wall.html

Jenny, I wondered something similar to your comment about the flare
to the wall. Big Brown's abcess looks pretty familiar to most of us
with laminitic horses. The difference for me was not only did they do
something different (glue on shoes,resectioning the hoof wall and
adding epoxy to aid in the wall functionality)but it worked as
evidenced by Big Brown winning the Derby.

I just wanted to put it out there for comments. Thank you for
yours! :-)

Betsy in Ohio


ranginui2007 <lynjwilliams@...>
 

I agree with Jenny. I look at those front feet and see a THREE year
old horse in serious trouble. The stress lines on the dorsal wall both
horizontal and vertical, the inflamed coronary band, the long,
contracted, sheared and under-run heels all point to some serious
underlying pathologies.

It's important to remember that this high tech solution isn't to 'fix'
his feet, it is to enable him to race. Totally different thing.
However they dress it up - it's basically about maximising his earning
potential. And if he's a stallion - they'll be freezing sperm so that
he can continue to earn even if he does break down irretrievably like
Barbaro.

I find it impossible to justify patching up the damaged feet of an
immature animal so it can continue to do the thing that damaged its
feet in the first place - and for what? So people can gamble. Stripped
of all its hype - racing is nothing more than a medium for gambling.

It's all put into perspective by the report of the filly's death in
the same race. She was raced so far beyond her ability to stay
balanced, she broke both front legs.

To describe an immature horse running itself to death as 'gallant' is
- to my mind - appalling hypocrisy. It makes the punters feel better
though - if you can convince yourself that the filly died 'gamely'
trying her hardest to please her rider, trainer, owner and those who
bet on her - well, it's a lot more rosy a picture than a physically
immature horse running on pure adrenalin to the point where first one
fetlock joint fails, then the other. Such is the power of adrenalin in
a young prey animal, she kept running after her legs broke and her
jockey was thrown off. It makes my blood run cold.

If you want to get a real handle on the issue, ask a bookie what odds
he'll give on Big Brown being alive and fully sound aged 10.

Sorry to sound off Betsy - it's not aimed at you and I really don't
want to start a debate about racing but I am really opposed to
prophylactic measures to keep horses in competition. We have strict
controls on the use of drugs to mask lameness in competition horses -
how can we justify using shoeing and synthetic hoof fillers to do the
same thing?

Lynn

--- In ECHoof@..., "Betsy" <inhishandsstables@...> wrote:

--- In ECHoof@..., "Betsy" <inhishandsstables@> wrote:

Hi all!

Since we had been discussing different techniques for helping
stabilize
compromised hooves using epoxy and shoes, I want to reference this
link
from Fran Jurga's site.
Here is a video that more fully explains the what and why's of the
technique.

http://hoofcare.blogspot.com/2008/04/derby-update-video-of-
thoroughbred-wall.html

Jenny, I wondered something similar to your comment about the flare
to the wall. Big Brown's abcess looks pretty familiar to most of us
with laminitic horses. The difference for me was not only did they do
something different (glue on shoes,resectioning the hoof wall and
adding epoxy to aid in the wall functionality)but it worked as
evidenced by Big Brown winning the Derby.

I just wanted to put it out there for comments. Thank you for
yours! :-)

Betsy in Ohio


Betsy
 

--- In ECHoof@..., "ranginui2007" <lynjwilliams@...>
wrote:
Sorry to sound off Betsy - it's not aimed at you and I really don't
want to start a debate about racing but I am really opposed to
prophylactic measures to keep horses in competition. We have strict
controls on the use of drugs to mask lameness in competition
horses -
how can we justify using shoeing and synthetic hoof fillers to do
the
same thing?

Lynn
I didn't take it personally. As I get the same gut wrenching
experience watching horses break down on the track (or elsewhere say
at the Rolex where two were put down this year)as the next person. It
happens every day. I also wondered about standing at stud a horse who
has such terrible feet (that he can not run without artificial
appliances to his feet).

I posted the information because, like the reason it came about or
not, the technology may be able to aid other horses to heal and grow
normal hooves again. Close your eyes for a moment to the why's of the
use on that horse and see the posibilities for others. That was my
thinking. Not to rehash why horse racing is bad for young horses
(what a gross understatement that is).

That abcess was a 'doosey' in anyone's book.

Betsy in Ohio


ranginui2007 <lynjwilliams@...>
 

Hi Betsy - I understand your reasoning. I just think that there are
better ways to allow a horse's feet to recover. Shoeing, even with
glued on shoes - won't fix the heel and bulb contraction that I'd
think was the cause of the original abscess.
I didn't see pics of it. Were they on that same site?

Lynn

--- In ECHoof@..., "Betsy" <inhishandsstables@...> wrote:

--- In ECHoof@..., "ranginui2007" <lynjwilliams@>
wrote:
Sorry to sound off Betsy - it's not aimed at you and I really don't
want to start a debate about racing but I am really opposed to
prophylactic measures to keep horses in competition. We have strict
controls on the use of drugs to mask lameness in competition
horses -
how can we justify using shoeing and synthetic hoof fillers to do
the
same thing?

Lynn
I didn't take it personally. As I get the same gut wrenching
experience watching horses break down on the track (or elsewhere say
at the Rolex where two were put down this year)as the next person. It
happens every day. I also wondered about standing at stud a horse who
has such terrible feet (that he can not run without artificial
appliances to his feet).

I posted the information because, like the reason it came about or
not, the technology may be able to aid other horses to heal and grow
normal hooves again. Close your eyes for a moment to the why's of the
use on that horse and see the posibilities for others. That was my
thinking. Not to rehash why horse racing is bad for young horses
(what a gross understatement that is).

That abcess was a 'doosey' in anyone's book.

Betsy in Ohio