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Question about hoof growth


Stacy
 

This is probably a stupid question...but I am trying to sort through
everything I am learning about feet in an effort to return my horse to
soundness permanantly.

I understand that the hoof grows from the top down. It has always been
obvious to me when looking at the hoof walls. Where does the sole
grow from? Does it grow out from under the coffin bone? If the
coffin bone has some sinking, will the growth of the sole be
affected? Will it really eventually gain the concavity it had
previous to the 'incident' as my farrier/trimmer has suggested?

Stacy


Ute <ute@...>
 

The sole grows from the bars forward and sideways and yes, a sinking CB will flatten the sole. It can only regain concavity with the right diet, correct trim and adequate exercise.
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Stacy
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 9:28 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Question about hoof growth

This is probably a stupid question...but I am trying to sort through
everything I am learning about feet in an effort to return my horse to
soundness permanantly.

I understand that the hoof grows from the top down. It has always been
obvious to me when looking at the hoof walls. Where does the sole
grow from? Does it grow out from under the coffin bone? If the
coffin bone has some sinking, will the growth of the sole be
affected? Will it really eventually gain the concavity it had
previous to the 'incident' as my farrier/trimmer has suggested?

Stacy


Stacy
 

Thank you Ute for the explaination - that helps a lot. Which leads
to another question.

My trimmer didn't want to trim back the bars much because of the
sinking. She felt that the coffin bone is sitting on the sole and
needs the support right now. My horse has a nice big frog, and she
only trimmed the bars to be even with the frog. She said she would
trim the bars back if my vet advised that to be appropriate, but my
vet didn't have an opinion. Should she trim the bars now or wait a
bit? She is coming back in 2 weeks...

Stacy


"Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

The sole grows from the bars forward and sideways and yes, a
sinking CB will flatten the sole. It can only regain concavity with
the right diet, correct trim and adequate exercise.


Ute <ute@...>
 

I would agree with that completely. In my opinions bars are often over trimmed anyway. Unless they are grossly laid over, in which case they might affect the horse negatively, I think bars are there for a reason. I actually believe they provide traction for the bottom of the hoof.
 
You trimmer seems to be doing all the right things :-)
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Stacy
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 9:50 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Re: Question about hoof growth

Thank you Ute for the explaination - that helps a lot. Which leads
to another question.

My trimmer didn't want to trim back the bars much because of the
sinking. She felt that the coffin bone is sitting on the sole and
needs the support right now. My horse has a nice big frog, and she
only trimmed the bars to be even with the frog. She said she would
trim the bars back if my vet advised that to be appropriate, but my
vet didn't have an opinion. Should she trim the bars now or wait a
bit? She is coming back in 2 weeks...

Stacy

"Ute" wrote:
>
> The sole grows from the bars forward and sideways and yes, a
sinking CB will flatten the sole. It can only regain concavity with
the right diet, correct trim and adequate exercise.
>
>


Abby Nemec
 

Stacy wrote:

If the coffin bone has some sinking, will the growth of the sole be affected? Will it really eventually gain the concavity it had previous to the 'incident' as my farrier/trimmer has suggested?
When the coffin bone sinks, the circulation becomes disrupted underneath, which affects the growth pattern of the sole. Concavity, however, isn't really IN the sole, though it seems like it should be. Concavity is formed when the walls have good laminar connections and are able to share the weight of the horse. Without tight laminae, the walls can't support the coffin bone. When they can, the sole is lifted into a concave shape underneath, and the solar connections between P3 and sole are restored. THEN concavity returns and the foot becomes functional.

And yes, that can be done, with the DDT-E strictly applied.

-Abby


--
**************************
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


Abby Nemec
 

Stacy wrote:

My trimmer didn't want to trim back the bars much because of the sinking. She felt that the coffin bone is sitting on the sole and needs the support right now.
That is a solid, safe approach. I would say your trimmer is on the ball.

-Abby



--
**************************
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


Melodycup3@...
 

 




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ranginui2007 <lynjwilliams@...>
 

Hmm - not sure I agree with Ute. The ground surface of the pedal bone
is covered in solar corium which produces the sole horn in a downward
and forward direction. (The upper surface of the pedal bone and
lateral cartilages are covered with a laminar corium which produces
the laminar horn). Bowker has postulated a role for the bar corium in
solar horn production but the extent of this is not yet fully
established. It isn't correct however to say the bars produce the sole.
If the pedal bone rests on the solar corium (all round as in sinking,
or at the toe as in classic founder) it causes bruising of the highly
vascular solar corium and over time can cause pressure necrosis -
tissue death.
The sole follows the shape of the ground surface of the pedal bone and
it is this which gives it concavity. Because the pedal bone is very
light it is can erode with unphysiological pressure; if it lacks a
good suspension within the hoof capsule or the sole cannot draw flat
on weightbearing, the concave surface can wear flat. When the bone has
lost its concavity the sole also loses its concavity.
However, sometimes when there is inadequate movement for the sole to
exfoliate, the sole becomes very full and 'flat' in appearance. Too
full a sole can inhibit hoof mechanism.
Lynn


--- In ECHoof@yahoogroups.com, "Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

The sole grows from the bars forward and sideways and yes, a sinking
CB will flatten the sole. It can only regain concavity with the right
diet, correct trim and adequate exercise.


BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance
Barefoot Trimmer

www.balancedstep.com

----- Original Message -----
From: Stacy
To: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 9:28 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Question about hoof growth


This is probably a stupid question...but I am trying to sort through
everything I am learning about feet in an effort to return my
horse to
soundness permanantly.

I understand that the hoof grows from the top down. It has always
been
obvious to me when looking at the hoof walls. Where does the sole
grow from? Does it grow out from under the coffin bone? If the
coffin bone has some sinking, will the growth of the sole be
affected? Will it really eventually gain the concavity it had
previous to the 'incident' as my farrier/trimmer has suggested?

Stacy


Ute <ute@...>
 

Oh , I agree with you - I was giving a simplified version. It most likely grows in unison downward and forward from the sole corium and the bars to create the sole. However , I am not so sure I agree with the explanation of loss of concavity because we have seen concavity come back with correct diet, exercise and trimming. Are you referring to pedal bone erosion due to chronic laminitis that will create a consistently flat sole?
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2008 5:41 PM
Subject: [ECHoof] Re: Question about hoof growth

Hmm - not sure I agree with Ute. The ground surface of the pedal bone
is covered in solar corium which produces the sole horn in a downward
and forward direction. (The upper surface of the pedal bone and
lateral cartilages are covered with a laminar corium which produces
the laminar horn). Bowker has postulated a role for the bar corium in
solar horn production but the extent of this is not yet fully
established. It isn't correct however to say the bars produce the sole.
If the pedal bone rests on the solar corium (all round as in sinking,
or at the toe as in classic founder) it causes bruising of the highly
vascular solar corium and over time can cause pressure necrosis -
tissue death.
The sole follows the shape of the ground surface of the pedal bone and
it is this which gives it concavity. Because the pedal bone is very
light it is can erode with unphysiological pressure; if it lacks a
good suspension within the hoof capsule or the sole cannot draw flat
on weightbearing, the concave surface can wear flat. When the bone has
lost its concavity the sole also loses its concavity.
However, sometimes when there is inadequate movement for the sole to
exfoliate, the sole becomes very full and 'flat' in appearance. Too
full a sole can inhibit hoof mechanism.
Lynn

--- In ECHoof@yahoogroups.com, "Ute" wrote:
>
> The sole grows from the bars forward and sideways and yes, a sinking
CB will flatten the sole. It can only regain concavity with the right
diet, correct trim and adequate exercise.
>
>
> BALANCED STEP
> Ute Miethe - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
> Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance
Barefoot Trimmer
>
> www.balancedstep.com
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Stacy
> To: ECHoof@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 9:28 AM
> Subject: [ECHoof] Question about hoof growth
>
>
> This is probably a stupid question...but I am trying to sort through
> everything I am learning about feet in an effort to return my
horse to
> soundness permanantly.
>
> I understand that the hoof grows from the top down. It has always
been
> obvious to me when looking at the hoof walls. Where does the sole
> grow from? Does it grow out from under the coffin bone? If the
> coffin bone has some sinking, will the growth of the sole be
> affected? Will it really eventually gain the concavity it had
> previous to the 'incident' as my farrier/trimmer has suggested?
>
> Stacy
>


ranginui2007 <lynjwilliams@...>
 

Hi Ute
As long as the bone is still healthy and properly formed, concavity
will return with trimming, exercise and diet. If however, the bone has
been subjected to persistent long term unphysiological pressure, it
may erode - in the direction of that pressure. All round pressure
results in overall loss of solar concavity - and with that, the
possibility of a fully concave sole is reduced; if it is under
pressure at the tip - it will erode there - or laterally or medially.
We don't yet know if and to what extent a pedal bone can remodel. But
once the bone is worn flat - in my experience the hoof remains flatter
than it should be - with consequences for shock absorption and
traction etc.
Chronic or undiagnosed laminitis is one cause - the suspension weakens
and the pedal bone rests on the sole - which reduces quality and
quantity of solar horn production; a fixated hoof capsule in which
the sole cannot flatten away from the descending pedal bone (eg shod
or overgrown inflexible hoof)is another. Both are exacerbated by the
amount of movement that is demanded of the horse on unyielding ground.

Lynn

--- In ECHoof@yahoogroups.com, "Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

Oh , I agree with you - I was giving a simplified version. It most
likely grows in unison downward and forward from the sole corium and
the bars to create the sole. However , I am not so sure I agree with
the explanation of loss of concavity because we have seen concavity
come back with correct diet, exercise and trimming. Are you referring
to pedal bone erosion due to chronic laminitis that will create a
consistently flat sole?


BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance
Barefoot Trimmer

www.balancedstep.com

----