Sidebone


Susan
 

I'm not sure if this is the appropriate place to pose these questions, because it's not related to IR or PPID. Ella's been dealing with lameness on and off all summer in her RF. It started in June and I thought it might be an abscess. She had 2 weeks off and then looked sound, but no eruption.  Put her back in work and she came up lame again after a couple of weeks of riding. This cycle repeated 3 times. Today I got a diagnosis  of "mild sclerosis of the spongiosa on the skyline view of the navicular and mild sidebone formation with excessive flare".

I'll post the x-rays in her album. She's always been barefoot. She's 9 years old. I've been trying to keep the flare under control. She due for a trim, so the flare is at it's worst right now. My questions are:

Is this a death sentence for her riding career? Is it ever possible to reverse sidebone? I've been given NSAIDs to administer to her. The vet suggested that she might  benefit from reverse shoes on her front. Is that something I should consider, or shoes in general? Lavinia gave me some suggestions on how to improve her trim. I'll continue with that. Can trimming alone keep her comfortable and in work? I've looked at very few x-rays, but to me the coffin bone looks tipped down, but the vet said it was fine.

Any advice is much appreciated,
--
Susan in BC 2020
Copper and Ella's Case Histories
Ella's Photos


 

My horse Taxi has HUGE sidebone. So large that i cannot get Scoot Boots on anymore.  I switched to EC Fury heart.  Seems to work. Anyhow, she should not have issues ridding.  As far as i understand it, once the cartilages start to turn to bone, there should be no pain.  My question has always been how does this affect shock absorption?  Taxi has NO problem doing a nice forward trot.


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Susan,

If your horse is PPID and/or IR, all questions should remain on the main group. If the horse is NOT PPID/IR, any questions, discussions about feet belong here on the Hoof sub-group. From Ella.'s history, breed and issues, IR is highly likely and treating her as such is in the can't hurt, will likely help category.

Side bone is calcification of the lateral cartilage. It does impact shock absorption and general mobility of the foot as bone doesn't have the ability to flex. Normally, it doesn't make a horse lame unless you actually hit the side bone, but over time it can make the gait less fluid. Meticulous medio-lateral balance will help to minimize the progression. Conformation may also play a role. It really shouldn't have any major impact on her riding career. Shoes won't help and may actually exacerbate the problem as the shoes will magnify the concussive forces transmitted thru the foot.

Overall, her trim looks pretty good. You are correct - there is some slight bony column rotation of the RF. That needs to be corrected thru the trim and you also need to figure out WHY she rotated. Sole depth is thinner than ideal, which would add to the discomfort. Toe could use a heavy bevel as it's a bit too long horizontally, but not excessively. M-L balance is hard to determine as she's not standing on the block - her lateral wall is entirely off, so is tipping the foot laterally while the leg itself is leaning medially. Medial wall flare is evident on the rad.

I don't see any blood work results in your case history - she should really have insulin, glucose pulled to see where you stand. Your hay needs to be tested, then mineral balanced correctly to provide her with all the nutrients she needs, in the correct proportions. Until that happens, it should be soaked before feeding. Given the slight rotation, thin sole and foot pain, keeping her entirely off pasture - or turned out with a sealed muzzle - would be the best option.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Susan
 

Thank you both. That makes me feel a bit better. She's such a sweet mare - has a great personality. I was really worried about her future comfort.

I didn't stress the navicular change because the vet didn't. When I got home and looked at the x-rays, it was really hard for me to find the area on the navicular bone that  he had pointed out. So I'm not sure if it's also something that I should worry about. If so, is there anything additional to what you've already mentioned, that I need to do?

I've tested this years hay. It's 8% (DM) ESC  and 1.7% (DM) starch. A bit higher than previous years, but within the acceptable levels. My lab only reports the results as Dry Matter. The problem with my hay has been a high iron level - this year it was 244 ppm. I'm taking the NRC plus course right now. I'm ready to order the minerals that I need to balance my hay and mix my own custom blend. Until now, I've been feeding the MadBarn Trace Mineral pak because it was the closest commercial mix, in Canada, that I could find to balanced the iron.  I've posted my hay results in the NRCplus files, but I'll add it to my case history so this group can see it too.  This summer she's only been out on grass for an hour a day first thing in the morning.  I have muzzles, but the hole in the bottom doesn't seem to slow my horses down much.

I will get her tested. It's just a matter of budgeting. I had my other horse (Copper) tested for PPID in the spring and the bill was a bit shocking. Do you know if any of the human blood glucose monitors could be used to test horses? Or maybe there is an equine version. I assume it's something that should be tested for regularly, so it would be good if I could do it myself.

Thanks,
--
Susan in BC 2020
Copper and Ella's Case Histories
Ella's Photos


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Susan,

While glucose is handy to know and can be used in conjunction with insulin to give you an idea of IR status, it's really insulin that is critical for determining laminitis risk.  Some owners have learned to draw their own blood and drop it off at a clinic for processing and shipping, and some people do use human glucose meters but still send insulin off for analysis.  There's more information on this in the main ECIR group messages. 

--
Kirsten Rasmussen
Kitimat, BC, Canada


 

Yes, you can use a human glucose monitor on a horse. You can search for "glucose monitor" on the main message list. But a glucose monitor won't give you insulin values, and insulin control is critical to PPID and EMS horses. 

Equine metabolic syndrome is not exactly like human diabetes. Most (not all) equines have normal glucose. You can read a good refresher on ECIRhorse.org. https://www.ecirhorse.org/Equine-Metabolic-Syndrome-overview.php 

While you're there, be sure to review the information about diagnostic testing and how to get the best results. https://www.ecirhorse.org/DDT+E-diagnosis.php   The lab tests can be a bit fiddly, with unexpected results from what might seem like the smallest misstep. I know this because I've made them all. 
--
Cass, Sonoma Co., CA 2012
ECIR Group Moderator
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