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Suggestion for gaining trimming experience


Vicki Kline <vlk@...>
 

With the recent posts on tools and positions, I thought back to how I
struggled in the beginning to do my own horses and what helped to
change that.

One thing was the clinics with KC who teaches the positions and tool
use quite well. The other was just trimming more. That can be a
challenge if you have only one or two horses, but what I did to get
more trimming time was to trim at a rescue. A few of us (about 7)
that were trimming our own, volunteered to trim at a local small
rescue. There were about 7 horses there, and our group would consist
of about 4 or 5 of us each time. Sometimes we had extra hands to
hold the horses; other times we just took turns holding and
trimming. We pretty much set the schedule, so we got to keep the
horses on track so the growth wasn't overwhelming.

We learned so much doing this - patience (they were rescue horses
after all!), horse handling skills, and obviously trimming - on all
KINDS of feet :) And the rescue got free trims. Definitely a win-
win situation, and we all felt good for having helped the horses. We
also got to experience each other's trim methods and ideas and help
each other with suggestions. Oh, and we went for lunch afterard!

If any of you have the opportunity to do this, I really recommend
it. It's a challenge, but it's rewarding, and your trimming skills
and confidence will grow with each visit.

Vicki


Sherrie Hilliard
 

... but what I did to get
more trimming time was to trim at a rescue. A few of us (about 7)
that were trimming our own, volunteered to trim at a local small
rescue.
What an AWESOME idea, Vicki. I think I am getting that position.
Tonight the lightbulb went on. I picked up Moonies hoof and boom! I was
in the perfect position. The difference was not only knees bent, but
being bent over more at the waist so I was closer to the hoof. He also
has a longer cannon than Blue, which I think also helps. I like the
idea of trimming for a rescue.

Sherrie & Blue


Abby Nemec
 

Sherrie Hilliard wrote:
Tonight the lightbulb went on. I picked up Moonies hoof and boom! I was in the perfect position. The difference was not only knees bent, but being bent over more at the waist so I was closer to the hoof.

Be REALLY careful - bend at the HIP, not at the waist. Your hip joints are made to bend that way, your spine is not. Stick your bum out and keep your back flat to prevent permanent injury.

Glad to hear this is starting to come together for you Sherrie!

-Abby



--
**************************
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


ranginui2007 <lynjwilliams@...>
 

I so agree! Use your abs, butt and thighs to hold your weight. Bend in
the middle and live to regret it!
Flat back, gluteus maximus (mine is rather more maximus than I'd
like)internal abdominals and most important, those powerful muscles in
your thighs. Practice this in the privacy of your own bedroom.
Stand side on to the mirror, keeping your back straight but
relaxed,legs slightly apart, slightly bend your knees keeping your
weight centred; push your butt out out as far as you can go
comfortably (keeping back straight) then bend your knees and lower
your whole body using your butt and thigh muscles, to the desired
level. When you come back up(even more important!) push up from your
thighs, use your glutes and abs and unfold. Never bend down or snap
back up from the waist. Take it from one who did and now paid the
price of a damaged lower back.

Hope I explained this clearly
Lynn

Lynn

--- In ECHoof@yahoogroups.com, Abby Bloxsom <dearab@...> wrote:

Sherrie Hilliard wrote:

Tonight the lightbulb went on. I picked up Moonies hoof and boom!
I was
in the perfect position. The difference was not only knees bent, but
being bent over more at the waist so I was closer to the hoof.

Be REALLY careful - bend at the HIP, not at the waist. Your hip joints
are made to bend that way, your spine is not. Stick your bum out and
keep your back flat to prevent permanent injury.

Glad to hear this is starting to come together for you Sherrie!

-Abby



--
**************************
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


J Amick
 

I have toyed with the thought of maintaining my horses'  feet in between farrier
visits,  but never gave it a thought about the lower back wear and tear.     I've had
3rd and 4th vertebrae  deterioration since I was 24 yro.   Was told then that my back is  =
to 20 yrs older than age.  I'll  be 60 this year.  Was also told to NEVER  ride horses again.   What a joke that was,  since I had just gotten my first horse in my life at 25  and waited all those years for him to reach breaking and training age of  4,  I told the surgeon to forget that order!       Actually the riding was the best exercise and still is to keep my lower  back  muscles in shape.   If  one rides with the horse using your seat  then those muscles will be used and strengthened.    Riding like a sack of  potatoes  accomplishes nothing but a sore butt.   Big difference! 

I appreciate the words of wisdom on this back problem.    Thanks,  as I never gave that a thought.
Judy-PA

ranginui2007 wrote:

 Never bend down or snap
back up from the waist. Take it from one who did and now paid the
price of a damaged lower back.

Hope I explained this clearly
Lynn

Lynn