Topics

To cushions & wedges & the like 🙂


J Foust
 

Good evening all, 

I have been contemplating a brain teaser topic, at least for me.

if a horse has negative angles on rads (hinds) but the external pastern to hoof angle/grain is barely brocken back and there is no bull nose .. would this imply that the digital cushion is lacking?

Would wedging to correct the negative angle be advisable in this senario? 

It’s more of an academically interesting question and I’d love to hear what your brilliant minds think 😁

Cheers!
--
Joella Foust 
Montana
2015
27y’s owner
13y’s trimming own
11y’s rehab’s
Bronwynn
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Joella%20and%20Bronwynn/Bronwynn/Bronwynn%20Case%20History.pdf
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=91706&p=pcreated,,,20,2,0,0
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Joella%20and%20Bronwynn/Hay%20Analysis/Lewistown%20Hay%202018.pdf
Negrette, Oliver, Riley, Graybee, Diesel, Zsa Zsa, Bronwynn
Asleep: Hunter, Snip, Houston, Frisky, RyeLee, #5


 

I had/have a few clients like this.  The heels are way to low, like crushed/run forward.  I try using glue on; boots 24/7; Hoof Armor, anything to stop heel wear.  I do not know enough about wedges to help you.  In my mind, theoretically, the wedge temp helps the hoof angle/ligaments.  But does it allow the heel to actually grow?


 

For some reason, my info did not show

Diann Kuzma
One Hoof at a Time
Joined 2018


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Good question, Joella.

In feet like these, all the necessary support structures in the back half of the foot are lacking in some way, including the digital cushion, lateral cartilage, frog, heels. The bull nose indicates that there is work being done to get a long toe back to where it should be. If the toes have always been kept short (horizontally speaking), then you won't necessarily have the bull nose as a rad flag. If the heels are underrun to any degree, you should expect to see a lower-than-ideal plantar angle on radiographs. Heel bulbs that protrude well behind the hoof and are softer and flatter are also an indication that the plantar angle is too low. The digital cushion is lacking in the sense that it is underdeveloped and is also displaced further back behind the foot. You can easily check its health by palpating it: a healthy digital cushion in an adult horse should have the firmness of a super ball. On too many horses, you'll find it feels much more soft and squishy.

There's a great example of this kind of foot that an ECIR member has been dealing with quite recently:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/photo/36909/15?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/photo/36909/16?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0

They're pretty dramatic and most cases are not nearly this badly out of alignment. Note the difference/improvement in both the bony column alignment and the heel bulbs from May to Aug. You can follow the specifics of Lynn and Relevante's journey on the Main ECIR Group.
 
A temporary wedging of the back half of the foot with padding that will support, but also allow for pressure-and-release, can be helpful while the underlying trim issues are corrected. Just using a firm wedge to elevate the heels doesn't solve anything in the longer term.The trick is to leave the actual walls at the heels unloaded so that they can relax down and back into their correct position. Otherwise, you just continue to apply constant pressure to the crushed heels, which maintains the status quo.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Diann,

Unfortunately, signatures do not carry over from group to group.You need to create a signature for this group the same way you did for the Main ECIR Group.

Just click on Subscription at the top left of the page. Then scroll down to the Signature box, fill in your name, general location and year of joining. Check the two boxes for web posting and email posting. Then scroll down to the bottom of the page and hit Save.

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support


 

Thanks, done, i hope


 

Computer took a bit to update.  Yippie
--
Diann Kuzma
One Hoof at a Time
PHCP Practitioner
Joined 2018


Rebecca and Joe
 

I am interested in this topic as well, as I am currently working with a good barefoot trimmer with ground parallel/negative angle in my boy's back feet with underrun heels all around. Lavinia what is involved in the trim to leave the walls of the heels unloaded?
--
Rebecca and Joe,  Lexington KY, 2020

Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Rebecca%20and%20Joe


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Rebecca,

You need to rocker/bevel the back of the heels but leave the vertical height of the heel buttress alone. Also need to rasp the wall out of weight bearing in the heel, leaving only the bar as the weight bearing point.

If you're using boots and pads, use a thicker pad,that really supports the entire bottom of the foot, but you can trim it so that the perimeter fits just inside the walls. Experiment with frog support of different heights and densities as well. Be prepared to change the pads as the needs of the horse change.

There are mark-ups in Lynn and Relevante's Photo album and discussions to go along with those on the Main ECIR Group. Also see Ramey's discussions here:

https://www.hoofrehab.com/BootArticle.htm

https://www.hoofrehab.com/HeelHeight.html

https://www.hoofrehab.com/HorsesSole.html

--
Lavinia

Moderator/ECIR Support