Was: Equicasts Now: Winter shoes


Nancy C
 

Geez, Ute, we gotta stop meeting like this.

Tell me where do you do the bulk of your professional practice?

>Horses generally have superior traction on slippery surfaces barefoot, plus they will not pack snow, as the hove and >naturally flex and expand. 

Yes, I know.

Shoes without caulks of course would slip more while shoes with caulks can cause excessive torque that may not be good for the musculo skeletal system. 

Yes, I know.

My horses whole hindend alignment changed after he was taken barefoot. I always thought he was slightly sickle hocked - he was not. He assumed this stance to compensate for the instability his shoes created. I have pictures to proof it. 

Gee, so let's see those pics!!!  And how long was he in shoes before you took him barefoot?  Do you have before and after pics of his trim? Mine have been barefoot for six years.  My oldest was ridden over all terrain, including our honking granite shards, barefoot prior to being retired.  

>> Can you imagine what musculo-skeletal compensation your horse's shoes might actually create? 

Just an aside, but this sounds a tad patronizing to me.  :-)  Maybe you could rephrase it?

>>Often we do not see the direct link because no studies are done in this respect. Perhaps many arthritic changes that >>simply attribute to age actually stem from musculo-skeletal compensation thanks to shoes. I really hope that some >>we will have actual research to support my concerns.

Please see above.   I would add, musculo-skeletal compensation can come from many reasons other than shoes.  You are not being fair in giving a complete picture to our reading audience.

 

>>Have you ever tried him bare in the winter and found it to be a problem?

 

I know my horse. And I know what we've been through for weather this winter. In other less severe winters, he does not wear shoes. I'm trying to avoid problems worse than three months of shoes.

Again, can you tell me where do you do most of your professional practice?  Just more than a little curious.

Nancy C (aka Nancy C and Beau and Gabe in NH)
EC Hoof Moderator


Ute <ute@...>
 

I was just trying to understand how shoes in the winter can possibly make such difference and help - after all there's always something new to be learned. I don't quite understand your question about where I do bulk of my professional practice. Do you mean area?
 
My horse was in shoes for approx 3 years before we took him barefoot and was bare before that. I have many before and after pictures - attached are the stance changes. The picture with shoes was taken approx. 3 years before he went barefoot. Over the years I kept observing this sickle hock stance with much concern. Now I no longer have to worry.
 
Musculo-skeletal issues are often overlooked and ignored by veterinarians and farriers. My statement about how shoes can negatively affect the msuculo-skeletal system was more like a rhetorical question and was not meant to be patronizing at all, because most folks do not even take it into consideration, simply because we do not tend to be aware of it.
 
It sounds like you are using shoes to prevent something form happening to your elderly horse in the winter, however it appears that you have not had an incident that caused you to do so, it is more like a preventative measure correct? This prompted me to think well, what are the benefits and cons of this approach and the possible risks involved? Could a barefoot horse really seriously fall in the winter due to icy conditions, or would I risk more by using shoes that could potentially severely strain the musculo-skeletal system?
 
I am trying to be open minded and acknowledge if shoes really have some benefit. I don't know everything and there always something new to be learned. I hope that's OK :-)
 
 
BALANCED STEP
Ute Miethe  - LMT/LAMT NCTMB
Nationally Certified Massage Therapist & Natural Performance Barefoot Trimmer
 

----- Original Message -----
To: ECHoof
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 11:16 AM
Subject: [ECHoof] Was: Equicasts Now: Winter shoes

Geez, Ute, we gotta stop meeting like this.

Tell me where do you do the bulk of your professional practice?

>Horses generally have superior traction on slippery surfaces barefoot, plus they will not pack snow, as the hove and >naturally flex and expand. 

Yes, I know.

Shoes without caulks of course would slip more while shoes with caulks can cause excessive torque that may not be good for the musculo skeletal system. 

Yes, I know.

My horses whole hindend alignment changed after he was taken barefoot. I always thought he was slightly sickle hocked - he was not. He assumed this stance to compensate for the instability his shoes created. I have pictures to proof it. 

Gee, so let's see those pics!!!  And how long was he in shoes before you took him barefoot?  Do you have before and after pics of his trim? Mine have been barefoot for six years.  My oldest was ridden over all terrain, including our honking granite shards, barefoot prior to being retired.  

>> Can you imagine what musculo-skeletal compensation your horse's shoes might actually create? 

Just an aside, but this sounds a tad patronizing to me.  :-)  Maybe you could rephrase it?

>>Often we do not see the direct link because no studies are done in this respect. Perhaps many arthritic changes that >>simply attribute to age actually stem from musculo-skeletal compensation thanks to shoes. I really hope that some >>we will have actual research to support my concerns.

Please see above.   I would add, musculo-skeletal compensation can come from many reasons other than shoes.  You are not being fair in giving a complete picture to our reading audience.

 

>>Have you ever tried him bare in the winter and found it to be a problem?

 

I know my horse. And I know what we've been through for weather this winter. In other less severe winters, he does not wear shoes. I'm trying to avoid problems worse than three months of shoes.

Again, can you tell me where do you do most of your professional practice?  Just more than a little curious.

Nancy C (aka Nancy C and Beau and Gabe in NH)
EC Hoof Moderator


Abby Nemec
 

Ute wrote:
My horse was in shoes for approx 3 years before we took him barefoot and was bare before that. I have many before and after pictures - attached are the stance changes. The picture with shoes was taken approx. 3 years before he went barefoot.
Thanks for posting this - boy he's cute. Can I tell you something without being offensive? That shoeing job is horrific. He's standing like that because he's shod poorly, not because he's shod.

Musculo-skeletal issues are often overlooked and ignored by veterinarians and farriers.

Agreed 100% - and I see horses shod like this, and worse, whose owners & vets ring up literally thousands of dollars in vet bills trying to "find the source of the problem".


It sounds like you are using shoes to prevent something form happening to your elderly horse in the winter, however it appears that you have not had an incident that caused you to do so, it is more like a preventative measure correct? This prompted me to think well, what are the benefits and cons of this approach and the possible risks involved? Could a barefoot horse really seriously fall in the winter due to icy conditions, or would I risk more by using shoes that could potentially severely strain the musculo-skeletal system?
The ice is something you just can't imagine. We all have creepers on our outdoor boots because you just can't walk outside. My own barefoot horses are all trapped in the paddock from mid-January til the end of February EVERY year. My sharp shod horses can go down the driveway.

The older the horse the harder it is for them to "catch themselves" when they have a little slip, and their bodies are more fragile if they do fall.

-Abby


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Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com