Re: The hardest part is at the start and becoming a warrior


Emily Phillips
 

"The hardest part for me with the IR journey was at the start..  It is hard to be a warrior for your horse until you are confident in what you are doing..  it takes confidence and courage and persistence to get the right help to bring these horses to good health and soundness."

 

 

Well said Paula!  Sadly it seems to be a consistent theme for everyone on here and lots of people not on here, that in order to do what is "right" for our horse we sometimes have to battle the professionals...  and work out what the right thing is in the process ourselves!

Every time without fail the person who is caring for the horse knows the horse and knows if there is something wrong, what is helping and what is now, and it is those instincts we have to trust.  Very hard to do when professionals tell you that what you are doing is harming your horse when that is the opposite that you want to do.  But through my own journey with both my horses over the last 3.5 years I have so much more confidence that I just "know" now.  If I don't think something is "right" it never is.  And it gives me great comfort to know that now as it means I have less doubt when a professional disagrees with me.  Never no doubt!  But less...  :)

 

Keep up the good work with Cory and Onyx...

 

Emily

 

with Cheyenne - prior mechanical laminitis not identified by the vet who did her pre purchase vet check or the vet who saw her 1 week before she foundered - now 6 months into her recovery and doing ok thanks to the wonderful advice from the wonderful people on here!  but still suffering hindend pain - the next thing I need to learn everything about...

 

and Saxon - 3.5 years of vets telling me there is nothing medically wrong with him, it is just behavioural and he is just a "bad" horse, despite numerous immune issues - now after me writing a 12 page report on his history and symptoms and pushing for more tests to be done, vets agree there is something wrong but have no idea what - I believe he has adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism caused by either an auto immune condition, exposure to a toxin, or Lyme disease...  I am still becoming a vet from the university of google to get to the bottom of what is wrong with my beautiful kind wonderful young horse...

 

Springmount, Victoria, Australia

Jan 2014

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