Date   

Blood pressure project - equipment suggestions?

Carlynne Allbee
 

I am game for this project, and should be monitoring my own blood pressure (probably) so I am willing to invest in some equipment. From first aid classes I have taken, I know how to take it but I also know I can't hear well enough....so I am considering one of the automatic ones.

Looking over a website such as Walgrens Drug Store chain,....
I know the wrist ones don't work - I have friends that have given me stern warnings about them.
I did see several that run on AA batteries, which would be great when you are attaching the cuff to a horse's tail.

Any suggestions?

Carlynne Allbee and Patience


---------------------------------
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Re: Blue Seal Carbguard and Triple Crown Low Starch

lynngs@...
 

I add water to all feed.

Keep in mind that a natural diet consists of plant material, which is about 95% water.

I think adding water to feed is a good thing.

Martha Stewart

Just kidding, (about the name not the water)
Lynn Swearingen


Re: Complicated Founder Trim, Photos of Mel

Joan and Dazzle
 

Please do not post copyrighted material without the owner's permission.

Joan and Dazzle

Pete Ramey has used the
remedy below to successfully treat such cases, because even if no or
tenderness is present, the deeper clefts should be treated, just in
case:

""Added 5-22-07

For years I've searched for the perfect thrush medicine. Most
products that kill the fungi and bacteria also kill living tissue;
contributing to the problem.


Re: Diet of wild horses ?

Joan and Dazzle
 

Maybe the reason that we don't see very many wild horses with
laminitis is because when they get it, they get eaten....

Just a thought.

Joan and Dazzle


Well I have heard of wild horses un their mid twenties and in
addition
I also think that the quality of life is more important to any
critter
than the quantity.


Re: Sleep deprivation, Was: Other matters

Ute <ute@...>
 

This may be mostly due to a body's stress response. Constant stress
can cause chronically elevated glucose levels in the blood to support
a perceived fight or flight response that in our modern lives often
never comes. If it did, it would burn off the excess sugar there to
be utilized for energy. So the sugar excess remains and needs to be
dealt with by the body with the help of insulin. This may also be a
contributing factor of IR, along with a diet that is too high in
NSCs.

Sleep deprivation certainly increases stress levels in individuals
who will try to function as normally as possible during the day.

DR Thomas has written some very interesting articels on this subject
that were published in the Natural Horse and are available to read on
his website: http://www.forloveofthehorse.com/misslink.php

Ute


--- In EquineCushings@..., J Amick <happyday23@...> wrote:

Just recently I read an article about the outbreak of type 2
diabetes
in humans being in
astronomical numbers and this was brought on by sleep
deprivation.
Well guess what?
Your reading a post from one! All along I've encouraged that
the
lyme disease
was creating many other problems like the IR in our horses.
Till the
day I die I will
say this, as I saw first hand what the lyme can do to push horses
into
Cushings, IR and
iron overload, and most of these created laminitis.
I use sawdust and pine shavings in my stalls and I noted years
ago of
who laid down flat out to get restful sleep, and who just stood
up to
"sleep". The
shavings told the story.
Judy-Pa

jtb14789 wrote:

My Cushings/IR horse developed this sleep deprivation problem
when he
contracted Lyme. The vet had no clue what was wrong with him. I
came
across the Equus article & it answered a lot of questions I had.

Maybe not directly related to Cushings/IR, but we do seem to have
a
significant number of members on the board who's horses
subsequently
develop Lyme.





-------------------------------------------------------------------
-----







Re: Penny's getting a cold

Wendy Golding
 

Another thought - when I hold the meter in between thumb and finger, I tend
to put my other fingers against his butt as a kind of leverage against the
meter being sucked in. It was just a natural way to hold it.



Wendy



_____

Subject: Re: [EquineCushings] Re: Penny's getting a cold


Re: Penny's getting a cold

Wendy Golding
 

Sandra Su-



Don't feel bad, I asked the exact same questions my first time. If Penny's
got a cold, it sounds like a minor one. That's exactly they way Rudy acted
during the epidemic - no fever, a little cough occasionally and just a
little mucus. Anyway, I did not tie a string to it. I just held on to it.
The digital ones have their own count down system. Stand to the side of her
rump and move the tail away from you. I put antibiotic lubricant gel on the
end of the meter and gentle pushed it in about 2 inches and just held it
there until the thing beeped that it was done. I read the meter and then
cleaned it with an antibiotic wipe and put it in it's little case until the
next use. Talk to her the whole time so she hears your voice. Good luck!



Wendy G.



_____

Subject: [EquineCushings] Re: Penny's getting a cold


Re: I need help for my foundering horse...

Ute <ute@...>
 

I would also check the ACTH levels, just in case because from what
she's getting, she really should not be quite as tender I would
think. Is it all four feet? If it is primarily one hind, then perhaps
something else is going on?

I am also not a fan of processed feeds. I could not see the contents
of the feed online which irks me - I think they should easily have
this info availabe to horse owners. Can you check the label to see if
it does it contain soy in any form?

Ute



--- In EquineCushings@..., "Cindy" <mustangs_drafts@...>
wrote:

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Mandy Woods"
<bittersweetfarm@> wrote:
She's a Nevada Butte Mustang and think she's been getting too much
of
her meadowgrass (low carb) hay without soaking. We'd let her out of
her pen in the AM before going to work and she probably ate
leftover
scraps of the orchard grass hay. She was eating 2nd cutting orchard
grass mix for years and only since we got this last hay it was too
hot (guy loaded it with fertilizer) so think that's what did it. I
think the meadowgrass is low enough in sugar (just sent it in to
have
it tested) but think she needs to be limited on the amount.

She's on the LMF NSC feed which is low carb and only gets 16 oz - 2
times a day. Both of her vets said when she's getting soaked hay
she's losing a lot of nutrients and they want her to get a balance
for the time being. She's on a dry lot so there's no grazing. She
did
get her insulin and glucose tested and got the results back -- way
too high but it was right after she'd been getting into the other
hay, I think. She's on a strict diet and losing weight -- doing
good
but just very tender in her feet and especially her rear feet now.

No sign of abscessing just sore on her right rear toe where the
coffin bone is. She is moving around a bit better today but these
things take time. She hasn't had any sugar of any kind for 2.5
months.

Thanks for the tips...a gal who's a part of this group uses the
same
farrier/vet as I do and she gave me a pair of soft ride boots to
use.
I tried emailing her but it got kicked back. Thanks, Karen!! She's
a
lot more comfy.

Cindy





Hi Cindy,
I'll add a comment to Joan's response. LMF feed is high in iron
and can
worsen IR (if she's IR) I know you said your vet bills are
growing
so when
you can squease in a blood test get INSULIN and GLUCOSE from the
same draw.
That will diagnosis if she has IR.
Please r/s/r the plain shredded beet pulp even if it says plain.
Get her
diet down to zero sugar/starch as best you can - then you can add
things
back in slowly. NO GRAZING! Just soaked hay and r/s/r BP and
minerals...the Temporary Diet. Do you know what triggered
this?
Tell us
more about this horse. Yes, she could be abscessing. Hot
water/espsom
salts and soak!
Mandy and Asher in VA


Re: Evitex AND Pergolide? REPOST

Cindy McGinley
 

"mannequin2d" <nobst@...> asked:

Hi group: I had asked this a few days ago but didn't receive any
replies on ground or whole berries vs. liquid. Would anyone know?
Thanks so much.

Wendy,

I can say that I have no idea why the liquid would be so much more expensive. I've never used it. Marketing, perhaps?

- Cindy and Alf (and entourage) in NY


Re: I need help for my foundering horse...

Cindy <mustangs_drafts@...>
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Mandy Woods"
<bittersweetfarm@...> wrote:
She's a Nevada Butte Mustang and think she's been getting too much of
her meadowgrass (low carb) hay without soaking. We'd let her out of
her pen in the AM before going to work and she probably ate leftover
scraps of the orchard grass hay. She was eating 2nd cutting orchard
grass mix for years and only since we got this last hay it was too
hot (guy loaded it with fertilizer) so think that's what did it. I
think the meadowgrass is low enough in sugar (just sent it in to have
it tested) but think she needs to be limited on the amount.

She's on the LMF NSC feed which is low carb and only gets 16 oz - 2
times a day. Both of her vets said when she's getting soaked hay
she's losing a lot of nutrients and they want her to get a balance
for the time being. She's on a dry lot so there's no grazing. She did
get her insulin and glucose tested and got the results back -- way
too high but it was right after she'd been getting into the other
hay, I think. She's on a strict diet and losing weight -- doing good
but just very tender in her feet and especially her rear feet now.

No sign of abscessing just sore on her right rear toe where the
coffin bone is. She is moving around a bit better today but these
things take time. She hasn't had any sugar of any kind for 2.5 months.

Thanks for the tips...a gal who's a part of this group uses the same
farrier/vet as I do and she gave me a pair of soft ride boots to use.
I tried emailing her but it got kicked back. Thanks, Karen!! She's a
lot more comfy.

Cindy





Hi Cindy,
I'll add a comment to Joan's response. LMF feed is high in iron
and can
worsen IR (if she's IR) I know you said your vet bills are growing
so when
you can squease in a blood test get INSULIN and GLUCOSE from the
same draw.
That will diagnosis if she has IR.
Please r/s/r the plain shredded beet pulp even if it says plain.
Get her
diet down to zero sugar/starch as best you can - then you can add
things
back in slowly. NO GRAZING! Just soaked hay and r/s/r BP and
minerals...the Temporary Diet. Do you know what triggered this?
Tell us
more about this horse. Yes, she could be abscessing. Hot
water/espsom
salts and soak!
Mandy and Asher in VA


Re: Complicated Founder Trim, Photos of Mel

Ute <ute@...>
 

I forgot to add - you may want to consider massage therapy to address
the muscles that might affect the front hoof wear pattern and do
specific exercise that will also tone weaker muscles that may be
contributing to the postural habits here. I good bodyworker should be
able to help you with both :-)

Ute

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

Hi Eva,
When I first read your post I was scared to even look at the
pictures - I expected much worse. They actually do not look that
bad
at all! :-)

You already have gotten a lot of good feedback. I am an equine
massage therapist who also does barefoot trimming and I follow the
Bowker/Ramey school of thought primarily! It is imortant that we
always listen to the horses (feet) because they will tell us what
they need.:-)

First I need to point out that as a massage therapist I know that
hoof wear patterns can also be the result of postural habits and
how
the horse prefers to use himself! Humans will also wear the soles
of
their shoes and heels in a predictable pattern for the same reason.

You horse is most likely left side dominant, which means his left
side is stronger. I can see this by the difference in the front
feet,
the left is slightly flatter while the righ front is more upright.
When I see that, I usually confirm this by looking at the shoulders
from behind because the dominant shoulder will also show me more
muscle development :-) The dominant foot tends to be wider and
flatter because it takes more load, not unlike the use of a humans
domiant hand, that for this reason also tends to be more developed.

Your horse also shows me the typical wear patterns that are related
to side dominance - the non-dominant leg tends to be pulled in more
towards the midline, hence the RF wears more on the outside for
that
reason. The LF is the opposite - it flares to the outside because
he
wears/steps more on the inside edge of the hoof. It is vital for
those reasons that the heels are trimmed balanced. I can see that
they are unlevel, especially in the dominant LF (which is typical
for
the domianant front foot, more or less). The collateral grooves can
be used as a measurement and the depth of both should be equal in
the
heel area.

My gelding is right side dominant and shows a very similar pattern,
just reversed and he has no laminitis issues.

Bottom line, like already mentioned, the heels of the front feet
are
too high. That by itself causes contraction! I am still not quite
certain though what type of opening cut the farrier did. However,
to
date, I have not heard this to be used to open up contracted
hooves -
lowering the heels (gradually - not all at once) seems to be of
utmost importance.

Essentially your horse's front feet should look more like the hinds
all the way around. I do not necessarily agree that the toes need
more agressive backing. However, the sole is always my guideline -
I
will not trim a horse shorter than waht the sole plane on the
bottom
tells me, because this could potentially sore the horse and is the
last thing we need in an IR challenged horse.

Your horse also shows me a considerable amount of retained sole in
the front. Again, that should not be carved out. It is an
indication
to me, from what I have learned, that the horse still needs it
there.
If not, it would simply exfoliate. However, it may also be a sign
that your horse does not get enough movement to stimulate the
release
of excess sole and to grow a healthier hoof overall.

The ripples and lines on the hoofwall show me too that your horse
is
still affected by his diet. The hoofwall to laminae connection, as
it
grows down from the coronet band, is still affected metabolically
and
not as consistently tight as it should be. The deeper clefts in the
back of the frogs in the front hooves are another tell tale sign
that
diet continues to be a factor for this horse. Pete Ramey has used
the
remedy below to successfully treat such cases, because even if no
or
tenderness is present, the deeper clefts should be treated, just in
case:

""Added 5-22-07

For years I've searched for the perfect thrush medicine. Most
products that kill the fungi and bacteria also kill living tissue;
contributing to the problem. I use a 50/50 mix of Triple Antibiotic
Ointment and Athletes Foot Cream (1% Clotrimazole) (for humans;
over
the counter at any pharmacy). I mix it thoroughly and put it in a
60cc catheter-tip syringe (available from any vet) (The syringe may
well be more important than the cream, as it allows deep
penetration
to the core of the problem). Mix the products in a Tupperware bowl,
then spoon in or 'top load' 15cc with a butter knife. I have my
horse
owners treat deep into central cleft daily until no cleft is
present.
No need to squirt it all over the frog; just a pea-sized dab at the
very bottom of the central sulcus. To date, I've seen it eliminate
deep, sensitive central frog clefts in 100% of cases within 2
months.
(A first, with every treatment I've ever used, though past
experience
tells me we'll never find a product that works on every case in
every
environment.)"" http://www.hoofrehab.com/frogtrim.htm

As you probably already know, to successfully treat an IR and/or
Cushings horse it is vital to have the proper diet, trim and enough
exercise. Exercise alone helps to reduce insulin levels quite
considerably. Cannot stress the exercise part enough :-) Best
wishes!!

Ute


Re: Penny's getting a cold

5 Pine Ranch
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Sandra Su



One more question: this thermometer doesn't have a place to attach a
string. The woman who helped me figure out how to operate it
suggested wrapping a small rubber band tightly around the end and
using that to attach a string. Would that be secure enough? Do I even
need one, since this thermometer is wedge-shaped, with the wide end
the part I hold? You can see I'm not used to this kind of
thermometer, having always used the old-fashioned kind that's a glass
tube with mercury.

=================

LOL - okay, I did have some visuals after Mandy and her comments - so I must stop giggling & write seriously.

Honestly, I have been very lucky to have quiet horses for those that have needed a rectal temp done. I would suggest you have someone help you by standing at her head, do not tie her. Use some lubricant before inserting the thermometer. The great thing about digitals is they do not take nearly the time as the old fashioned kind and I always stand and hold the thermometer until it beeps. However, if you are more comfortable - by all means do the elastic and clip idea....but definitely have someone to help you with this procedure.

I have to tell you, we take care of our neighbours aged cat (14 years old) and on a recent visit to the vet with diagnosis of diabetes, the vet was quite stunned to tell me that this is the first cat in his 20+ years of practise to purr with a thermometer up his butt....lol - so you may get lucky :)

Do take a temperature though - it is the best way to assess the seriousness of the flu. Nothing that EC List will not help & support an owner with huh...LOL

Amberlee
.


Shubert - any ideas?

becwachtel <becwachtel@...>
 

My horse has been greatly improving since early June when I became a member of this
group and took charge of dealing with his obvious IR condition and now known Cushings.
I have been riding him maybe once a week, mostly walking for a few miles and he has
been booted. These last few months has been a real learn as you go experience but I
believe the horse is improving. I have seen improvement from where he would walk on the
gravel and larger stone in the barnyard and just about fall down, to where he has been
trotting over the same area without batting an eye. Last week I was so thrilled because on
Sunday, I rode him BAREFOOT and he felt fine. We only went for a walk, for about 45
minutes covering less than 4 miles, on all types of footing; Rooty trails through the
woods, shale, leafy muddy soft areas and macadam. I was so thrilled I just jumped for joy
and he was a very happy horse.

On Tuesday I noticed he was not as comfortable walking around even in the soft muddy
paddock. He was still pretty much willing to walk with me, so I tried to walk him 1/2 mile a
day, on my macadam road(all I have time for). Today, I booted him and took him out on
the trail and while he was cutting up on some hills, he was not 100% comfortable. Rode
for about 1.5 hours, mostly walking.

I don't jump in here too often. But I see that it is an opening for many people to
brainstorm with me, so I will do so now. Shubert's history was posted to the website n
June. I also have had the good fortune to talk to Vicki Kline a lot and she does try to give
me good ideas and things to think about. In fact, she did question me the other night
about the possibility of an abscess. I did not have testers, but I did not think he had one.
My trimmer should be out this week so I will have her take a close look too. The
temperatures have gone up drastically this week from where they were the previous week.
While Shubie's paddock is mostly dirt, I did see the slightest green fuzz on top of the mud,
He had a slight backslides in the middle of Dec due to grass, even though by all counts it
should have been dead. He did not develop any lameness, just that his crest got very hard
and slightly larger. Now, the crest is about the same size as in Dec and a slight bit softer.
So I wonder if he nibbled this almost not there grass and it caused a reaction again, just
slightly different than the last one.

I am hardly in an emergency mode at this point, but I was so surprised at the big
difference between Sunday and Tuesday…and well, the rest of the week. Any thoughts. I
don't want to take up too much room here so I will let you respond with ideas/questions
and then I can fill in the blanks. Thanks in advance for your help.

Becci and Shubert.


Re: Complicated Founder Trim, Photos of Mel

Ute <ute@...>
 

Hi Eva,
When I first read your post I was scared to even look at the
pictures - I expected much worse. They actually do not look that bad
at all! :-)

You already have gotten a lot of good feedback. I am an equine
massage therapist who also does barefoot trimming and I follow the
Bowker/Ramey school of thought primarily! It is imortant that we
always listen to the horses (feet) because they will tell us what
they need.:-)

First I need to point out that as a massage therapist I know that
hoof wear patterns can also be the result of postural habits and how
the horse prefers to use himself! Humans will also wear the soles of
their shoes and heels in a predictable pattern for the same reason.

You horse is most likely left side dominant, which means his left
side is stronger. I can see this by the difference in the front feet,
the left is slightly flatter while the righ front is more upright.
When I see that, I usually confirm this by looking at the shoulders
from behind because the dominant shoulder will also show me more
muscle development :-) The dominant foot tends to be wider and
flatter because it takes more load, not unlike the use of a humans
domiant hand, that for this reason also tends to be more developed.

Your horse also shows me the typical wear patterns that are related
to side dominance - the non-dominant leg tends to be pulled in more
towards the midline, hence the RF wears more on the outside for that
reason. The LF is the opposite - it flares to the outside because he
wears/steps more on the inside edge of the hoof. It is vital for
those reasons that the heels are trimmed balanced. I can see that
they are unlevel, especially in the dominant LF (which is typical for
the domianant front foot, more or less). The collateral grooves can
be used as a measurement and the depth of both should be equal in the
heel area.

My gelding is right side dominant and shows a very similar pattern,
just reversed and he has no laminitis issues.

Bottom line, like already mentioned, the heels of the front feet are
too high. That by itself causes contraction! I am still not quite
certain though what type of opening cut the farrier did. However, to
date, I have not heard this to be used to open up contracted hooves -
lowering the heels (gradually - not all at once) seems to be of
utmost importance.

Essentially your horse's front feet should look more like the hinds
all the way around. I do not necessarily agree that the toes need
more agressive backing. However, the sole is always my guideline - I
will not trim a horse shorter than waht the sole plane on the bottom
tells me, because this could potentially sore the horse and is the
last thing we need in an IR challenged horse.

Your horse also shows me a considerable amount of retained sole in
the front. Again, that should not be carved out. It is an indication
to me, from what I have learned, that the horse still needs it there.
If not, it would simply exfoliate. However, it may also be a sign
that your horse does not get enough movement to stimulate the release
of excess sole and to grow a healthier hoof overall.

The ripples and lines on the hoofwall show me too that your horse is
still affected by his diet. The hoofwall to laminae connection, as it
grows down from the coronet band, is still affected metabolically and
not as consistently tight as it should be. The deeper clefts in the
back of the frogs in the front hooves are another tell tale sign that
diet continues to be a factor for this horse. Pete Ramey has used the
remedy below to successfully treat such cases, because even if no or
tenderness is present, the deeper clefts should be treated, just in
case:

""Added 5-22-07

For years I've searched for the perfect thrush medicine. Most
products that kill the fungi and bacteria also kill living tissue;
contributing to the problem. I use a 50/50 mix of Triple Antibiotic
Ointment and Athletes Foot Cream (1% Clotrimazole) (for humans; over
the counter at any pharmacy). I mix it thoroughly and put it in a
60cc catheter-tip syringe (available from any vet) (The syringe may
well be more important than the cream, as it allows deep penetration
to the core of the problem). Mix the products in a Tupperware bowl,
then spoon in or 'top load' 15cc with a butter knife. I have my horse
owners treat deep into central cleft daily until no cleft is present.
No need to squirt it all over the frog; just a pea-sized dab at the
very bottom of the central sulcus. To date, I've seen it eliminate
deep, sensitive central frog clefts in 100% of cases within 2 months.
(A first, with every treatment I've ever used, though past experience
tells me we'll never find a product that works on every case in every
environment.)"" http://www.hoofrehab.com/frogtrim.htm

As you probably already know, to successfully treat an IR and/or
Cushings horse it is vital to have the proper diet, trim and enough
exercise. Exercise alone helps to reduce insulin levels quite
considerably. Cannot stress the exercise part enough :-) Best
wishes!!

Ute


Finally - new photos

Jeanette
 

Thanks to all of you who have been helping me out with this whole
IR/Cushings experience. Several of you asked for photos and I have
posted them on the ECHoof site under Manda:
http://pets.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHoof/photos/browse/e30e

I've also removed the hoof photos and x-rays from the photo albums
here, leaving just body shots.

I'd appreciate anything you can share as my trimmer/farrier situation
has been a bit shakey over the past year.

TIA

Jeanette
Colorado


Re: Diet of wild horses ?

Ute <ute@...>
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., Carlynne Allbee
<samwisebaggins@...> wrote:

While one would be tempted to say that wild horses eat naturally and
therefore may eat more healthy than our domesticated ones....How old to
they get? Look at how many people on this list have equines over 20,
25 and even over 30 years old? Would they have lived that long
foraging in the wild?

Carlynne Allbee and Patience


---------------------------------
Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

Well I have heard of wild horses un their mid twenties and in addition
I also think that the quality of life is more important to any critter
than the quantity. My point is that if our domestic horses eat and
exercise more like wild horses we would probably hardly see any
laminitis and founder cases at all and the ones we would see would
probably be mostly Cushings related. This assume that we would also
supplement in domestic settings as needed to provide optimum health to
our horses.

In my opinion prevention is always prferrable over crisis management.:-)

Ute


Re: Penny's getting a cold

Mandy Woods
 

Hey Sandy,
Jeffers sells sleeves for rectal palpations.....would you like me to find the order number for you? !!
You better try the rubberband/string idea or you'll be doing your first invasive procedure!
Glad Penny felt better today.
Mandy who is giggling....


Re: Complicated Founder Trim, Photos of Mel

John Stewart
 

Hi Eva,

I don't think it is practical to answer everything in one go.

Basic principals:
The first thing I look at in photos of feet is to see how straight the tubules are and the evenness of the growth rings. A hoof whose tubules run straight to the ground and the growth rings run evenly around the foot indicates an even spread of the forces applied to it from inside and outside. Any deviation of either of these parameters indicates the response of the hoof to uneven distribution of forces on it or in it. What we have to do is to try to work out if any of the deviations are likely to be of any significance.

Mel's feet:
From the side, we can see that the new growth right at the top of the hoof seems to be at a different angle to the older growth - certainly the front feet, but I think probably in the hinds as well.
The growth rings widen from the front of the feet to the heels.
Both of these indicative of laminitis changes.

From in front and behind, different heel heights and unlevel coronet line and growth rings wavy on the front wall.
Indicates medio-lateral imbalance.

The problem with laminitis combined with medio-lateral imbalance is that the laminal separation and instability of the bone, as well as down the front wall, will be more on the side that the pedal bone is leaning onto than the other side.

These are things to think about that you can apply to replies from others - I see Lynn has already made some good comments. I will try to add some more specific advice tomorrow.

John


Re: Penny's getting a cold

Sandra Su
 

At 9:39 PM +0000 1/13/08, Wendy Golding& Amberlee answered my question.
Thanks. I will take her temp., which I was going to do the other day,
but having recently bought a digital thermometer and not knowing how
to use it, I got instructions from someone at the barn, and then it
got too busy. I want to do it at a time when Penny can stand quietly
in the cross ties.

Today I rode for a short time. She's sound, in spite of my farrier's
fears about the rim pad. She coughed a little when I started
trotting, but it didn't seem even as bad as yesterday when the
farrier was here and she was merely standing in the cross ties. Also,
there was only a small amount of mucus in her nostrils. I went easy
on her, only riding a short time and mostly at a walk. She took issue
with a corner of the ring where there were 2 blue barrels. The last
time she was there, there was only 1 blue barrel, so of course, the
addition of another barrel made that corner very suspicious. So we
walked in circles passing those fearsome barrels till they became
boring. Then we did it in the other direction. That was the bulk of
our ride.

It'll be quieter tomorrow in the middle of the day, being a weekday,
so that'll be the perfect time for temperature taking.

One more question: this thermometer doesn't have a place to attach a
string. The woman who helped me figure out how to operate it
suggested wrapping a small rubber band tightly around the end and
using that to attach a string. Would that be secure enough? Do I even
need one, since this thermometer is wedge-shaped, with the wide end
the part I hold? You can see I'm not used to this kind of
thermometer, having always used the old-fashioned kind that's a glass
tube with mercury.

Now, for all those laughing their heads off at my ineptitude, I admit
that I'm not mechanically inclined. So, take heart, newbies who have
never cored your hay yet. I mastered that, and if I can do it, you
can, too!

--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Sleep deprivation

Lynn Williams <lynjwilliams@...>
 

All animals evolved to work - us included. We are not designed to sit
on our (ever increasing) butts watching tv and eating highly
processed, high salt, high saturated fat, high sugar 'food'.

The result of this grossly unnatural lifestyle is an epidemic of
metabolic disorders - a state of disequilibrium - induced by our
lifestyle. Don't even get me started on the people who promote this to
make profits.

Because modern medicine works within a symptomatic paradigm - it
treats the symptoms and, unless there's money to be made from it,
largely ignores the causes.

Same with horses. There has been an explosion of equestrianism as a
leisure pursuit (accompanying the post-WW2 increase in leisure time
and disposable income throughout the 'developed' world), which markets
have responded to and in turn promoted. We have seen changes in the
social and cultural status of horses, from working animals to pets or
leisure accessories - and recently - problems of the locomotor system
(which, from the advent of shoeing, have been the major cause of
health problems in the horse) are being overtaken by problems of the
digestive and metabolic systems. In particular, disruptions of the
highly complex messenging and regulating neuro-endocrine and
peptidergic nervous systems.

As with us, these problems exist in a context of environmental
pollutants, social stress, mineral imbalances, poor nutrition,
inadequate rest, a sedentary lifestyle etc etc.

OK - this is a simplistic view for the purposes of illustrating a
point. Sleep deprivation in humans: too much fat, salt and sugar, too
little quality protein - too little movement - body is full of the
wrong sort of energy, not physically tired, brain is too full of
cyber-junk and the person doesn't sleep properly. The levels of
hormones that signal satiety drop off, those that promote appetite
increase. The person gets up not fully rested - physically or mentally
- and wants to eat. And so it goes - once the weight starts to pile
on, both the desire to and possibility of exercise reduce - muscular
skeletal and heart muscle damage ensure that. Vicious circle.

The person is pretty soon locked into a degenerative cycle and the
younger they go into it, the longer they are in it, the harder it is
to break - until chaos ensues and all bets are off because the system
regulators don't work according to the known rules anymore. And not
only do they not work, they have effects we cannot predict. We can do
little more than manage the symptoms - or helplessly watch the decline.

We can fully understand the cyclical and dynamic nature of this only
if we look at humans in their broad social context - same with horses.

OK - back on my hobby horse. We all know the nature of horses - herd,
prey, flight instinct, movement, trickle feeders, efficient processors
of high fibre/ low sugar forage, hierarchical (place in herd
renegotiated constantly), sleeps standing up and lies down for only a
couple of hours and flat out for less, natural posture head low etc etc.

Disruptions to those basic species requirements ALWAYS have an effect;
some effects are cumulative and increase with age; some interact and
exacerbate each other.

Disruptions to the horse's skeletal balance are at the very foundation
of its physical and mental health because, if it cannot operate its
stay apparatus or properly engage its dorsal ligaments, it cannot
fully regenerate muscles whilst upright - it has to use its propulsive
muscles constantly just to remain upright - for 90+% of its life. If,
in addition to that, it is too stressed, too insecure, too stiff to
lie down when it needs to - it is in a state of perpetual physical and
mental stress.

As a prey animal the horse hides distress very well and it manifests
in different ways according to the nature of the individual horse and
its relationships. The ones at most risk sadly - are the stoical,
kindly, gentle souls who just persevere.

For me, the consequences of an unbalanced skeleton cannot be
overstated. Far from it being the proverbial straw, they are in fact
the huge burden the horse carries all the time; and the triggers for
metabolic disorders - are the straws that break its back.

The foundation of the skeleton is the ground parallel pedal bone and
its protective shell - the hoof. And look at what we have done to the
hoof over the past 20-30 years. We've added to the catalogue of
disorders that accompany shoeing by promoting a high heel hoof form
and 'orthopaedic' shoes - as the answer to problems that are caused by
shoeing.

How iron-ic is that?

Lynn

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