Date   

Re: Shredded Beet Pulp without molasses

Ute <ute@...>
 

---Thank you very much - I hope they carry just shredded as well and
not only pellets - that's been my struggle.

Ute


Re: Shredded Beet Pulp without molasses

Joan and Dazzle
 

We have a file in the files section in the folder entitled Beet Pulp
which lists the known sources of beet pulp and/or Ontario Dehy Timothy
Balance cubes.

Check the file and see if any of the locations are near you.

Joan and Dazzle

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Ute" <ute@...> wrote:

I have a hard time locating shredded beet pulp in Western Washington
that does not contain molasses. Does anyone know of a good source in
the US that can be made readily available?


Shredded Beet Pulp without molasses

Ute <ute@...>
 

I have a hard time locating shredded beet pulp in Western Washington
that does not contain molasses. Does anyone know of a good source in
the US that can be made readily available?


Re: is this diet ok

Abby Nemec
 

---- attreeking <michelleaking@...> wrote:

I used to feed the unmolassed speedibeet but changed to normal
unmolassed BP which you DO NEED TO SOAK FOR 24 hours then rinse
thoroughly till water runs clear before feeding,
Not necessary to soak so long:

beet pulp shreds -
rinse
soak 5-10 minutes
rinse
feed

beet pulp pellets -
rinse
soak 30-60 minutes
rinse very thoroughly
feed

I've been feeding beet pulp for many, many years to many, many horses, and until I needed to r/s/r it for the IR guys I would just add water & feed. We have had 3 horses who were frequent chokers and were absolutely FINE as long as there was plenty of water, no soaking necessary. Nowadays if I were still using it (I feed OD cubes instead now) I would at least rinse any BP that I fed even to non-IR horses.

-Abby

--
---------------------
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


Re: is this diet ok

attreeking
 

Hi,

I used to feed the unmolassed speedibeet but changed to normal
unmolassed BP which you DO NEED TO SOAK FOR 24 hours then rinse
thoroughly till water runs clear before feeding, apparently the
speedibeet has a very high iron content which isn't good for them.

The cushings group recommend the combined sugar and starch to be
below 10% and the only feed I found is the Winergy range made by
Spillers. Go to www.winergy.co.uk - it's low-glycemic and you can
call the help desk who are very friendly to discuss your pony's
nutrition and health issues.

The vitek 4 equids is the Vitex Agnus cactus herb - if your pony
is confirmed with cushings after you get the ACTH test results then
I would not give this and get the Pergolide medication in tablet
form to get this under control. Do NOT give your pony both.

As for Formula 4 feet, alot of people use this but if you are going
to get your hay analysised I would recommend you then balance the
minerals and vitamins against it using this group's help.

My horse has stiff joints and I use Cortaflex with great results but
this product does not suit all, the glucosamine if you have an IR
pony may effect them.

If you want to email me directly michelleaking@... I'm in
the UK too and willing to share any of the information and experience
I have with having a horse with cushings.

Best regards

Michelle, Rufus and Sam




--- In EquineCushings@..., "twinkle_and_amber"
<kelly111@...> wrote:

would you say this diet is ok for my pony
she 12.2

300grams oh hifi lite for break and dinner
http://www.dengie.com/pages/products/fibre-feed/hi-fi-lite.php

3 qauters of a pint of speedi-beet for break and dinner
http://www.britishhorsefeeds.com/speedi-beet/typical-analysis.aspx

vitek4 equids and furmula4 feet
www.equilife.co.uk

with some garlic and mint

was also feeding pernamax but dont no if i still should for stiff
joints the tablets
http://www.maxavita.com/products/pet/pernamaxequine/

and 8 pounds of hay which i soak and rinse ,am planning on getting
hay anaylised im moving stables in 2 weeks so planning on doing that
when i get there.


Re: looking for old post

 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "ponyjackpal" <takarri@...>
wrote:

Hi
I am looking for an old message & have spent too many hours
searching.
Hopefully someone can steer me in the right direction.
It was regarding a conversation between someone having a problem with
their vet & testing for glucose/insulin & a comment was made that
they
thought the vet was testing for a certain type of test that was
wrong?
& costly, when all they had to do was request (?).
Could be:

Glucose tolerance test - instead get glucose and insulin from the same
draw

Dexamethazone suppression test - instead get ACTH

Cortisol - instead get ACTH

Ring any bells?

Kathleen (KFG in KCMO)


Re: I need help for my foundering horse...

 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Cindy" <mustangs_drafts@...>
wrote:

She's a Nevada Butte Mustang
Is she overweight or thin? Can you post her glucose and insulin
numbers? This is her 2nd round with laminitis? What do you think
brought on the first event? Prior to this, what was her work level?

She was eating 2nd cutting orchard
grass mix for years and only since we got this last hay it was too
hot (guy loaded it with fertilizer) so think that's what did it.
Actually, the opposite is true. Stressed grass, either by drought,
cold or lack of nutrients will drive up sugar to save itself.
Healthy, fertilized grass is what we're after, preferably cut early
in the day (after a week of cloudy weather, perfect temperatures and
ideal moisture conditions!)

Both of her vets said when she's getting soaked hay
she's losing a lot of nutrients and they want her to get a balance
for the time being.
Soaking will reduce sugar, surface iron, potassium, sodium notably
and the rest of the major and trace minerals stay fairly constant.
That said, most hays are unbalanced and deficient in some trace
minerals whether they're soaked or not. Once you get your hay
analysis back, let us know - it's much simpler (and cheaper) to
replace (balance) the nutrients with mineral balancing than with a
commercial feed. The feed won't balance your hay, soaked or unsoaked.

She hasn't had any sugar of any kind for 2.5 months.
How much (weight) hay is she getting?

Good work on getting her feet supported. Let's get the rest of her
diet balanced and see if we can get that insulin down.

Kathleen (KFG in KCMO)


Re: Peanut has moved -QUESTIONS & HELP needed

lindarollins38@...
 

I also have a custom mix formulated to match it.
What is the mix?


Re: is this diet ok

 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "twinkle_and_amber"
<kelly111@...> wrote:


300grams oh hifi lite for break and dinner
http://www.dengie.com/pages/products/fibre-feed/hi-fi-lite.php

3 quarters of a pint of speedi-beet for break and dinner
http://www.britishhorsefeeds.com/speedi-beet/typical-analysis.aspx

vitek4 equids and furmula4 feet
www.equilife.co.uk

was also feeding pernamax but dont no if i still should for stiff
joints the tablets
http://www.maxavita.com/products/pet/pernamaxequine/

and 8 pounds of hay which i soak and rinse ,am planning on getting
hay anaylised im moving stables in 2 weeks so planning on doing that
when i get there.
Kelly,

I'm not that familiar with UK products. The Speedi-Beet should be OK
provided that it's not processed with molasses - if so, soak and rise
it before feeding. Can't offer much about the Dengie product except I
saw molasses in the ingredients. Formula 4 feet should be OK, the
pernamax looks interesting - not sure what the studies show regarding
chondroitin supplementation in horses. I wouldn't use this product to
replace fatty acids - if you have a source of flax seed, it's
preferable.

Since you're going to move her in 2 weeks and have the hay analyzed,
focus on the emergency diet that you received when you joined and
hopefully, some UK members will chime in here.

Kathleen (KFG in KCMO)


Re: Peanut has moved -QUESTIONS & HELP needed

lindarollins38@...
 

Abby,
I'm talking to him right now! He's got plenty!!
Linda


Re: Peanut has moved -QUESTIONS & HELP needed

lindarollins38@...
 

WOW! Peanut is in Simsbury. Thanks for the very prompt reply. Anything other advice for me/him/us?

Linda (Nutless)


Re: Peanut has moved -QUESTIONS & HELP needed

Abby Nemec
 

Where in CT? My hay guy has safe hay, in Litchfield. Call Ray at 860 567 8577 & mention my name. I also have a custom mix formulated to match it.

-Abby

---- Linda <lindarollins38@...> wrote:
Anybody in CT know of safe hay???
--
---------------------
Abby Bloxsom
www.advantedgeconsulting.com


Re: looking for old post

Mandy Woods
 

Hi Pauline,
That could have been Dr. Kellon describing the Glucose Tolerance Test. Do a 'search' with her name and gtt to see if that is what you're looking for.
Mandy and Asher in VA


Peanut has moved -QUESTIONS & HELP needed

Linda <lindarollins38@...>
 

He left yesterday. :-( He is getting rescue remedy, and had a dose of
Gastric Guard last night when he arrived at the new barn. He is very
sweaty on his chest, belly & flanks. He has been for a few weeks, well
before the move. He is not sweaty under his blanket. Just spoke with
my daughter who said he is "perky" and had lots of manure in his stall
last night & drank 1/2 a bucket of water, which is normal. Still on
1.5 mg pergolide, the APF should arrive today, and I have some
omeprazole coming from Ian today as well. All will be arriving at his
new home.
Should I use the omeprazole profalactically for 15 days? Is there
anything else I should be doing? He has 3 weeks of his tested hay, so
the mad search is underway for more, or to find a batch at the school
that I can hoard & test. Anybody in CT know of safe hay???
Thanks for any & all help.
I am very sad and miss my horse, but he is with McKenzie at long last.
Linda w/o Peanut in MA


Re: I need help for my foundering horse/soaking hay...

briarskingstonnet <briars@...>
 

Hi Cindy,

Soaking hay can reduce the sugars up to 30%. The items that you lose
in soaked hay is not nearly as consequential as the high sugars
without soaking.
Just to add to what Joan has said,I think the other thing that is
reduced by soaking is potassium,and my understanding is that there is
usually enough potassium in the diet to cover for this loss.

Lorna


Re: looking for old post

briarskingstonnet <briars@...>
 

Hi Pauline,

Did you try the Files section here?
Look under Blood Testing for IR and Cushings

Lorna


Re: I need help for my foundering horse...

Jean
 

Cindy, Thought I would quickly share my experience with you. When my
IR horse foundered 2 yrs ago, before I discovered this group, she was
stall bound and was given unlimited amounts of hay (because I didn'[t
know better and thats what everyone told me). Her insulin jumped from
199 to 308 in 2 months! Then I discovered this group and the OD
balanced cubes. Her insulin is now 6.9 and she is doing great. I
know it is hard to go against what your vet tells you-but the
experience on this group is real time and priceless. Just thought I'd
share.
Jean and Lady

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Cindy" <mustangs_drafts@...>
wrote:
Both of her vets said when she's getting soaked hay
she's losing a lot of nutrients and they want her to get a balance
for the time being.


Re: I need help for my foundering horse...

Joan and Dazzle
 

Hi Cindy,

Soaking hay can reduce the sugars up to 30%. The items that you lose
in soaked hay is not nearly as consequential as the high sugars
without soaking.

Most hays are high in iron. They are not "balanced" without testing
and adding minerals. Soaking hay gets rid of some of the stuff that
you don't want - excess sugars, rinsing off surface iron.

Our list is cutting edge. We balance hays using the standards set in
the Nutrient Requirements of the Horse.

One of the things that I've discovered is that you can't tell the
sugar and starch levels of a hay by looking to. The only way to know
is to test. Some hays that look "crappy", that you are sure are low
in sugar and starch are not. And some hays that are "lush" looking,
actually test low!

There are a number of things that will increase sugar levels in the
hay. Time of day of the hay cutting, length of time that the hay
laid on the field before baling, drought conditions, bright days and
cool nights. So a field that was cut from one year to the next can
vary in sugar content. Even hay cut before sunrise will test
differently than hay cut in mid-afternoon.

LMF is low in sugars and very high in iron. If your horse has
issues, we do not recommend that you use it. Many horses are iron
overloaded. That is one of the things that can drive IR.

So, if you want to horse horses to have a "balanced" diet, the only
way to get that is to balance it. To reduce sugar and starch, soak
it, since it's not balanced to begin with.

The difference between soaked and unsoaked hay can make a huge
difference to a laminitic horse!

Joan and Dazzle

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Cindy" <mustangs_drafts@...>
wrote:

She's on the LMF NSC feed which is low carb and only gets 16 oz -
2
times a day. Both of her vets said when she's getting soaked hay
she's losing a lot of nutrients and they want her to get a balance
for the time being.

Cindy


looking for old post

ponyjackpal <takarri@...>
 

Hi
I am looking for an old message & have spent too many hours searching.
Hopefully someone can steer me in the right direction.
It was regarding a conversation between someone having a problem with
their vet & testing for glucose/insulin & a comment was made that they
thought the vet was testing for a certain type of test that was wrong?
& costly, when all they had to do was request (?). It did generate a
bit of feedback- regarding problem vet(?). It was a few months ago & I
have given up looking for it-
I have access to Iddexx(Aus) & I was given similar info- but something
doesn't sit right.
Any ideas?
Cheers
Pauline & Jack(pony)


Re: Penny's getting a cold

Sandra Su
 

At 3:46 AM +0000 1/14/08, Amberlee wrote:
Honestly, I have been very lucky to have quiet
horses for those that have needed a rectal temp
done. I would suggest you have someone help you
by standing at her head, do not tie her.
I've taken Penny's temperature before,
and she's fine in the cross ties. She really
doesn't mind, and she stands very well in the
cross ties. How I do it is to cross tie her, then
when I insert the thermometer, I stay back there
and hold it till it's ready to come out. I've
done it before with the old-fashioned
thermometer, so the digital should be a piece of
cake.
My problem isn't how to take her
temperature, it's what to do with a new,
unfamiliar piece of equipment. I'm so
mechanically challenged, it's a wonder I can
drive a car. Sometimes I have trouble opening my
door with the key!

At 3:46 AM +0000 1/14/08, Rita Lockridge wrote:
It’s so small, a little lube (or spit) will be
plenty to get it in and you are off!
I use spit. It works just fine, it's
readily available, warm, it's free, and there's
less to handle than if I use a jar of vaseline or
whatever.

I usually don’t turn mine on until I’m in the
rectum, since it may take a reading too low
outside the body.
Thanks! Using a digital for the first
time, that's the kind of advice I need.
OK, I know this is off topic, so I won't post about it anymore.
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...

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