Date   

Re: Questions

Sandra Su
 

At 8:50 PM +0000 3/24/08, thepiegirl2003 wrote:
Yes, I am missing my brain. I am trying to absorb all of the information and do what's best for Sammy and am getting overwhelmed.
It happens to everyone. I hope that helps you feel better. Every newbie has said how overwhelming all the info is. You're not alone.

I think I may have gotten the wrong hay analysis because it doesn't seem to have all the info I need.
Where did you get it analyzed, and what hay test did you ask for? I know that Equi-analytical saves the hay for a while, and if you want further testing, and they just did it, they may still have the hay to do the additional tests. If you have to get another hay test, send your hay to them and ask for Trainer #603. That's a test that's often recommended here, and the one I got for Penny's hay. I know that one has the required info. I think there are other places people have used with success, but this place is popular, and it's where I had my hay test, so I'd recommend it to you.
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Re: Equs Magazine

Sandra Su
 

At 8:50 PM +0000 3/24/08, angie J wrote:
BIG article about EXACTLY what we are doing here on this group. Post
it in ALL the barns that have been thinkingof us a the "lunatic
fringe." I knw it's going up at Peanut's barn!!!
***********************888
Why's that? I'm new, but everything I've learned here has done nothing but aid my Wookie? ... so, to what do "they" objsect?
Some vets and barn owners have never heard of some of the things we do, and they pooh-pooh it when people say they learned it on the Internet. There's a lot of suspicion about info learned on the Internet. Of course, there's misinformation on the Internet, just as there is in every part of life. Intelligent people have to sift the good from the bad, wherever they get info. But I guess some vets think they know best, even if they aren't up on the latest research findings, etc.
Since Penny was diagnosed, we've been at 2 different barns, and both barn owners think I'm a little nuts to go to such extremes. I think that attitude comes from the fact that a lot of the extra trouble falls to them -- getting Penny to eat with her supplements in her feed, for instance. Also, the present barn owner doesn't like it when she suggests the supplement she uses and I say it's too high in iron. Stuff like that.
You are lucky if you haven't met with resistance yet. But be ready to have that happen. Someone will come along and when you describe what you do, that person will think you're crazy to go to all the trouble.
My barn owner said to me something hinting at my lack of sanity (but politely) and added, "Penny is probably the healthiest horse in this barn." Duh! Why does she think that's so, if her way is better?
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Re: Alert- -More stuff in ODTB cubes

tomtriv <ThePitchforkPrincess@...>
 

I have been using 3-4 bags a week for my mare for years now. Dawn
exists totally on the cubes. Yes, there have been bits of chopped up
baling twine. (For a photo, see
http://pets.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHoof/photos/browse/4b03?c=)
just today I found a small pebble in her feed bin - which is the
first time ever btw. However, she has been eating these cubes for
years and she is still around despite the impurities. Dawn is the
oldest horse in the paddock and her coat is the shiniest - not bad
considering she is the only one with metabolic issues. Her coat was
pretty dull before she was on ODTB cubes exclusively. Check out her
photos to see the changes over the years.

Considering the impurities found in hay bales, it isn't really all
that surprising that they would end up in cubes. Even IF Ontario
Dehy uses small square bales, and it were physically possible, I
doubt the workers would have the time (at the current cost of cubes)
to split and search each blale and flake for impurities?

There was a thread before ( I have searched for it unsuccessfully...
perhaps it was a private email?) Anyway, I am pretty sure I remember
someone saying that when the workers switch from making one type of
cube to another, the conveyor belts often contain bits of the
previous type of cube they were making. This is how the larger cubes
(containing grain) get into the timothy balance cube bags. If I
remember correctly, ~I really wish I could find that thread!~ Dr. K
said this shouldn't cause a problem with our horses. I know, I know,
but I am totally sure I remember this!

The bottom line (for my situation at least) is that these impurities
have happened before and will happen again - BUT without these cubes,
Dawn would be in deep trouble.

-LeeAnne
Newmarket, Ontario
Case History:
http://www.sportshorses.com/cases/tomtriv.WimpleoDawnLight.htm
Photos:
http://pets.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHoof/photos/browse/682a
All Season Muzzle Photos:
http://pets.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHoof/photos/browse/d6a2


Re: Dazzle - In the hospital (long)

bigwhitevan2002
 

---

Are there any other options besides bute, regumate, or implants?



She has occassionally had bad cycles in the past. I didn't calendar
them. It's always worst in the spring and summer, with them seeming
to be non-existent in the winter.

Big sigh.

Joan and Dazzle
Hey Joan,

not sure really about any of your questions ....but... we did have a
mare that we gave the implants to. She had the most awful heat cycles
seemed to be in intence pain waking the barn folks and neghbors 1/4
mile away with her screaming and wall kicking abosoulutly insane!!! We
checked her for GC tumor and everything but nothing showed just these
awful cylcles.. barn manager at the time said she seemed to be in very
much pain, eventually we got kicked out of that barn for her behavior
( cant blame the folks she was tearing the place down and waking all
the neighbors everyone thought there was a huge stallion fight but it
was one 14hh paint pony..) and we had to resort to drastic measures,,
implants... they worked for her problem wonderfully no more intense
cycles no more heat just a calm quiet mare like she was in the winter
time..

they put the things in her neck about 4 of them and they lasted about
3 months before the next set...

not much help just some info on our experience with them..
Julie


Re: beet pulp and flax seeds

Cindy McGinley
 

Hi Nancy,

Did anyone ever answer your questions?

- Cindy and Alf (and entourage) in NY

(message left intact on purpose)

----- Original Message -----
From: "luckycharmfarm" <LuckyCharmFarm@...>
To: <EquineCushings@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2008 10:18 AM
Subject: [EquineCushings] beet pulp and flax seeds


Happy Easter everyone! I got beet pulp, flax seed, and a grinder for my mare. She is
Cushings but not IR. No laminitis or founder history. And she needs
to GAIN WEIGHT.
I have been reading about the doses and substitution ratio's etc. but
am not clear yet. I see that Dr. K. says 4-6 oz of ground flax. Others giving 2 oz?? What dose should I give her?
She is still on Equine Senior which I know, I know, needs to go away
but that is a later post about what is available in my area. Same for
the hay situation. Right now I just want to get her on flax and beet
pulp and have her gain weight.
Should I give her beet pulp in addition to her current diet or
substitute it for the either the Senior, the hay or both given that
she needs to gain weight?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My other mare is 22 and normal. How much beet pulp should I feed her
and should I substitute it for anything as well? I just want to keep
her healthy.
Thanks and I will add Florida vendors to your lists as I go along...
Nancy
Angel & Surprize


Re: Dazzle - In the hospital (long)

lindarollins38@...
 

Wow Jan,
I don't have any answers or suggestions because this is so far out of my league, but, you and Dazzle have every ounce of good energy, faith and bottomless hope that this resolves itself and/or with treatment quickly and easily for both of you.
Hugs,
Linda

--
I am a member of Rural Area Veterinary Services. See what we do!
www.ruralareavet.org

http://www.sportshorses.com/cases/rollinslinda.Peanut.htm

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Joan and Dazzle" <horsies4luv@...>
Hi,

I need some advice.

Last Wed, I arrived at the barn before work to meet my vet to do the
standard bloodwork that I have done every two months (ACTH, Insulin,
Glucose, Iron panel). When I got there, Dazzle was chipper and happy
to have her breakfast early. I noticed in her stall that she had a
clean spot where she had moved her shavings. I thought that perhaps
she had a hard time getting up and her leg swooped them aside. Later
I noticed that there were shavings on the bars on the walls. I
thought that perhaps she had rolled.

She was in good spirits. I cleaned her stall as I waited for the
vet. Plenty of poop and she was eating well.

We commenced walking. She's moving better than she has. She was
bright and chipper. All of a sudden, she couldn't put her left hind
leg down. She hardly even rested it. I immediately suspected upward
fixation of the patella for something that dramatic to have
occurred. It was just all of a sudden. I walked around to that side
of her and her whole flank (internal obliques) were all in a spasm.
She was contracted up. It was weird. And she couldn't do weight
bearing for that leg.

The trainer nearby saw it and immediately thought that she was
typing up. But she hadn't done any work and it was early morning, so
heat and exertion wouldn't have been a factor. Additionally, it was
the flank muscles and not the big gluteal muscles that were so
contracted.

The vet arrived. He was somewhat puzzled. He said that for typing
up, it's usually Ca, K, E and Se issues. Her hay is balanced and she
gets supplemental E and Se every day. So then he immediately thought
that wouldn't be it.

Additionally, this isn't something we've observed before.

The vet thought that it might be gas. She seemed more comfortable.
He suggested that we just observe her. I went to work.

Wed night, she was just miserable. She was standing on 3 legs and
didn't feel good at all. I buted her, which I rarely do. She had
normal poop in her stall and had eaten all her dinner.

Thurs, she seemed better. Normal poop. Normal appetite. Pretty
bright, but low energy from the tough day the day before. She was
standing on all 4 and didn't mind when I gently brushed her side.

She seemed to be getting better as the week went on. It still didn't
make any sense to me. Normal eating, normal poop in quantity, size
and moisture.

Sunday morning, I went down for the farrier. She was bright and
chipper. She was going after her breakfast. Normal poop in her
stall. I took her for a walk to loosen her up. The muscle
contractions on her side happened again. My farrier commented that
that just wasn't right.

I hooked up the trailer and took her to the hospital. By then, the
episode seemed to have passed. She was bright and chipper. As they
took her into the examining room, the muscles of her flank spasmed
again. Their medical notes called is "fasciculation".

Dazzle had had surgery for an enterolith 3 years ago. It was at the
same hospital. They took tons of xrays. No stones, no sand, and they
didn't think she had any symptoms of colic.

The game plan was to keep her overnight, oil her, scope her for
ulcers and do ovarian ultrasound today. She has ulcers and the ovary
on the left had larger follicles than on the right.

They plan to keep her until tomorrow to verify that she passes the
oil. They started her on zantac today.

It was suggested to re-ultrasound her ovaries in 3 weeks to see
where we are. And to bute her every 3 weeks for a few days.

Another suggestion that was thrown out was to try regumate, or
implants.

When I joined this group, she always had swollen udders. When I put
her on pergolide, that was the only thing that changed drastically
was that the swelling went down. It didn't really effect her affect.

Her cycles are irregular and she's on jiaogulan and aakg, so I think
that makes the bute an unattractive option.

The surgeon at the hospital is not real keen on adding hormones to a
horse that doesn't need them. I tend to agree, but the level of
misery that she experienced makes me want to try something. The last
two cycles were also very tough on her. She's the sweetest little
girl and when she's out of sorts, I know that it's not just
something little.

The hospital won't prescribe the regumate or the implants and said
to talk to my vet, which I'm OK with.

Since I've not had any experience with either the regumate nor the
implants, I have no idea what to expect, or even the questions to
ask.

Questions I've come up with so far:

Do the implants come in different dosages?
How do they work?
Do they stop the horse from ovulating?
Do horses get polycystic ovary?
How can you tell the difference between polycystic ovary and
maturing follicles?

The surgeon didn't seem to think that there were very many other
things that it could be. He said that it was unlikely to be a
bladder stone because there was no blood in her urine.

Are there any other options besides bute, regumate, or implants?

Are any of these treatment options contraindicated on a mare that is
on pergolide (.75 mg), jiaogulan, aakg, alc, and ala? She has been
doing so well on our little program that I hate to stop it. On the
Tues night before this happened, she trotted next to me as I walked.
I hadn't seen that in forever.

She is very IR.

She has occassionally had bad cycles in the past. I didn't calendar
them. It's always worst in the spring and summer, with them seeming
to be non-existent in the winter.

It looks like I bring her home tomorrow, but I still haven't
formulated the "game plan". - The good news was that her xrays
looked clean as far as possible enteroliths go.

Big sigh.

Joan and Dazzle






Dazzle - In the hospital (long)

Joan and Dazzle
 

Hi,

I need some advice.

Last Wed, I arrived at the barn before work to meet my vet to do the
standard bloodwork that I have done every two months (ACTH, Insulin,
Glucose, Iron panel). When I got there, Dazzle was chipper and happy
to have her breakfast early. I noticed in her stall that she had a
clean spot where she had moved her shavings. I thought that perhaps
she had a hard time getting up and her leg swooped them aside. Later
I noticed that there were shavings on the bars on the walls. I
thought that perhaps she had rolled.

She was in good spirits. I cleaned her stall as I waited for the
vet. Plenty of poop and she was eating well.

We commenced walking. She's moving better than she has. She was
bright and chipper. All of a sudden, she couldn't put her left hind
leg down. She hardly even rested it. I immediately suspected upward
fixation of the patella for something that dramatic to have
occurred. It was just all of a sudden. I walked around to that side
of her and her whole flank (internal obliques) were all in a spasm.
She was contracted up. It was weird. And she couldn't do weight
bearing for that leg.

The trainer nearby saw it and immediately thought that she was
typing up. But she hadn't done any work and it was early morning, so
heat and exertion wouldn't have been a factor. Additionally, it was
the flank muscles and not the big gluteal muscles that were so
contracted.

The vet arrived. He was somewhat puzzled. He said that for typing
up, it's usually Ca, K, E and Se issues. Her hay is balanced and she
gets supplemental E and Se every day. So then he immediately thought
that wouldn't be it.

Additionally, this isn't something we've observed before.

The vet thought that it might be gas. She seemed more comfortable.
He suggested that we just observe her. I went to work.

Wed night, she was just miserable. She was standing on 3 legs and
didn't feel good at all. I buted her, which I rarely do. She had
normal poop in her stall and had eaten all her dinner.

Thurs, she seemed better. Normal poop. Normal appetite. Pretty
bright, but low energy from the tough day the day before. She was
standing on all 4 and didn't mind when I gently brushed her side.

She seemed to be getting better as the week went on. It still didn't
make any sense to me. Normal eating, normal poop in quantity, size
and moisture.

Sunday morning, I went down for the farrier. She was bright and
chipper. She was going after her breakfast. Normal poop in her
stall. I took her for a walk to loosen her up. The muscle
contractions on her side happened again. My farrier commented that
that just wasn't right.

I hooked up the trailer and took her to the hospital. By then, the
episode seemed to have passed. She was bright and chipper. As they
took her into the examining room, the muscles of her flank spasmed
again. Their medical notes called is "fasciculation".

Dazzle had had surgery for an enterolith 3 years ago. It was at the
same hospital. They took tons of xrays. No stones, no sand, and they
didn't think she had any symptoms of colic.

The game plan was to keep her overnight, oil her, scope her for
ulcers and do ovarian ultrasound today. She has ulcers and the ovary
on the left had larger follicles than on the right.

They plan to keep her until tomorrow to verify that she passes the
oil. They started her on zantac today.

It was suggested to re-ultrasound her ovaries in 3 weeks to see
where we are. And to bute her every 3 weeks for a few days.

Another suggestion that was thrown out was to try regumate, or
implants.

When I joined this group, she always had swollen udders. When I put
her on pergolide, that was the only thing that changed drastically
was that the swelling went down. It didn't really effect her affect.

Her cycles are irregular and she's on jiaogulan and aakg, so I think
that makes the bute an unattractive option.

The surgeon at the hospital is not real keen on adding hormones to a
horse that doesn't need them. I tend to agree, but the level of
misery that she experienced makes me want to try something. The last
two cycles were also very tough on her. She's the sweetest little
girl and when she's out of sorts, I know that it's not just
something little.

The hospital won't prescribe the regumate or the implants and said
to talk to my vet, which I'm OK with.

Since I've not had any experience with either the regumate nor the
implants, I have no idea what to expect, or even the questions to
ask.

Questions I've come up with so far:

Do the implants come in different dosages?
How do they work?
Do they stop the horse from ovulating?
Do horses get polycystic ovary?
How can you tell the difference between polycystic ovary and
maturing follicles?

The surgeon didn't seem to think that there were very many other
things that it could be. He said that it was unlikely to be a
bladder stone because there was no blood in her urine.

Are there any other options besides bute, regumate, or implants?

Are any of these treatment options contraindicated on a mare that is
on pergolide (.75 mg), jiaogulan, aakg, alc, and ala? She has been
doing so well on our little program that I hate to stop it. On the
Tues night before this happened, she trotted next to me as I walked.
I hadn't seen that in forever.

She is very IR.

She has occassionally had bad cycles in the past. I didn't calendar
them. It's always worst in the spring and summer, with them seeming
to be non-existent in the winter.

It looks like I bring her home tomorrow, but I still haven't
formulated the "game plan". - The good news was that her xrays
looked clean as far as possible enteroliths go.

Big sigh.

Joan and Dazzle


donkey

meganrust172 <whodunit@...>
 

I have a jenny donkey which is showing signs of IR. I plan to feed her as though as she IS IR,
by tracking down some local hay that is low in NSC. She has history of laminitis--actually IS
mildly laminitic right now--and has fat pads on her crest, sides, and around her tail base.
She was overfed in the past. I feed my herd of horses and donkeys high-quality orchard
grass hay, and can see that it is too rich for her. Her recent flare-up of laminitis is likely due
to an increase in the amount of hay she got. That increase has been stopped now.

Will feeding a hay low in NSCs, at the amount of 1.3% to 1.8% of her body weight, be
sufficient to prevent any further flare-ups of her laminitis? She shares a large treed field--
with no grass in it--with 2 other donkeys and 3 horses. She also gets a daily de-wormer,
Continuex.

She is on Banamine to help with the laminitis, and I'll be weaning her off it soon, to see if the
laminitis has lessened to a level she can handle. She also has significantly high levels of liver
enzymes, though that appears just to be her genetic make-up, and is not a problem for her.
But, does that high liver enzyme level change the way I handle her IR?

Thanks for any input on this subject.


Possible ODTB cubes in TEXAS

Saucier Kathy
 

This is still in the works but I wanted to give a heads up to people in Texas that we are working on getting the Ontario Dehy Timothy Balance cubes to Texas thanks to Triple Crown and Robin Staloch the nutritionist there who is speaking to our distributor Evergreen Mills.
I have a list of individuals that I have corresponded with, after my previous email a few weeks ago, that have an interest so if you are in Texas and are interested also, and not received my personal emails, do go ahead and contact me. We are arming Robin and Jerral with the interest to get the president of Evergreen to go with this. Contact me at gksaucier at verizon.net.
When this is approved and TC is supplying our distributor we can add us to Susie's list!!
Kathy Saucier & Magic
Carrollton, TX


Winter coat retention

horsecorrect <horsecorrect@...>
 

I haven't posted for a while since my horse has been "stabilized" with
pergolide and proper diet. Now that Spring is here, I am concerned that
she is not shedding. My other horse is losing her coat dramatically! I
have read that a reduction in pergolide dose seems to help the coat
thickness problems. I wouldn't mind the thick coat but she seems hot
now and the temperatures are not even very high yet. When they get
higher, she will melt!

Her ACTH had gone from 132 in Nov to 24.5 in Feb. Her attitude and
general demeanor were greatly improved, as well. Is it correct that
ACTH levels drop from Spring into Fall?

I'd appreciate any input if someone has the opportunity.

Thanks.

Denise


Re: Vet says Beet Pulp is bad

Claire C. Cox-Wilson <shotgun.ranch@...>
 

Answers preceded by ####

--- In EquineCushings@..., annianda@... wrote:

Well... I'm not sure. It was done at ANTECH. It looks like the units
they
used for Glucose is mg/dl but the Insulin is MICROU/ML. Is that the
same? The
Equine Insulin comment says >90mU/ml... which my vet says -- shows
she's not
IR. Does that help?
##### These labs drive me crazy! They use these measurements
interchangeably...unless my brain is on meltdown...SHE IS IR !
Your vet is just going by the fact that the numbers fall in the normal
range but doesn't know about Glucose:Insulin ratio and probably less
likely to know about RISQI. Her RISQI is .13 anything >.32 is IR

****Can you get beet pulp shreds and R/S/R?

I probably can... but if they're soaked, aren't they going to turn
into the
same mush as pellets? I think it's the mush she's opposed to.
##### shreds will not turn into mush.....just very wet shreds.

Claire from AZ


Re: Equs Magazine

lindarollins38@...
 

See the "My vet told be beet pulp was bad" message thread for starters! That's EXACTLY what I'm talking about! LOL
Honestly, we have all met with resistance on some level from one or many sources. Something about old dogs & new tricks?? I don't know, but you are right. MY horse has certainly improved since I found this list, as have thousands of others. I shudder to think of where poor Peanut would be if I hadn't found this list last August!
Linda


I am a member of Rural Area Veterinary Services. See what we do!
www.ruralareavet.org

http://www.sportshorses.com/cases/rollinslinda.Peanut.htm


Re: Equs Magazine

Angie <ralf.jansen@...>
 

BIG article about EXACTLY what we are doing here on this group. Post
it in ALL the barns that have been thinkingof us a the "lunatic
fringe." I knw it's going up at Peanut's barn!!!
***********************888
Why's that? I'm new, but everything I've learned here has done nothing
but aid my Wookie? Also, if the information is 'cutting edge' or
considered 'out of the ordinary'... think back 20 years and ask
yourself if you knew anyone who took their horse to a "chiropractor...
or massage theraphist"..lol.

so, to what do "they" objsect?

angie J


Re: Vet says Beet Pulp is bad

oakridge@gorge.net <oakridge@...>
 

He also told me to quit feeding beet pulp and buy oats instead.
Whew! These are the kinds of posts that keep me getting equine cushings posts every day, even
though I rarely read them. To remind me that my beautiful 29 year old friend through life would
have been put down 7+ years ago if I would have listened to my vet and not found this site and
Eleanor Kellon. Abby has continued to remain founder free. Aside from a sudden case of pnemonia
over the last 7+ years, with strick dietary management, she has been happy and healthy. Best of
all, from observation of my horse, my veterinarian is now a believer that diet matters, minerals
matter, and there is just something about that chasteberry. The horses that use it just seem to
keep on going. Bonnie and Abby


Re: Levothyroxine for Weight Loss?

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "conniegraham"
<conniegraham@...> wrote:


Has this method been tried or supported since? I am asking to
avoid
the 'guinea pig' scenario :) I couldn't find anything for or
against in the files.
Before we knew what IR was, these horses were routinely given thyroid
supplements with variable results so there is a "traditional use"
history. It never prevented or improved laminitis, probably helped
with weight loss but never with abnormal fat deposits.

Part of the problem is the "restricted calories" part. Resitricting
calories too much worsens IR. Makes more sense to me to restrict the
type of calories like we do here. If your weight loss stalls on the
2% of ideal bodyweight or 1.5% of current body weight feeding
guideless (S/S less than 10), take a look at the DE of your hay. If
below 7 or over 8 you may have to make some adjustments.


Eleanor


interpreting dex suppression test results

Melanie Kruse <mkruse6663@...>
 

Would someone please help me interpret the dex suppression test done on my horse? The pre cortisol level was 4.5 ug/dl and the post level was 0.3 ug/dl. My vet said that indicated he had Cushings so we started him on pergolide. But the reading I have done indicates if the post level goes way down then they are "normal" and a Cushings horse's results would stay high. Does anyone know how to interpret the dex suppression test results?


____________________________________________________________________________________
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Re: Levothyroxine for Weight Loss?

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "conniegraham"
<conniegraham@...> wrote:
My vet printed off several recent (2006)articles (AAEP)on this
subject
for me and one suggests supplementing with 48g/day of Levothyroxine -
purely to help with the weight loss aspect, and then weaning off
after
goal weight is achieved.
There has actually only been one study on this. It was very careful to
emphasize long term effects are unknown, etc. When used, it should be
done just like your vet described. If you don't get out of the normal
range it's probably not harmful short term, although you will be
suppressing the thyroid's natural function.

I wouldn't go so far as to say you *have to* to it. Weight usually
comes off very smoothly if you restrict sugar and starch, and are
careful NOT to restrict calories too much. Adjust your feeding rate as
weight changes.

Eleanor


Re: soybean meal

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Vicki Kline" <vlk@...> wrote:

--- In EquineCushings@..., "emjewelry" <emjewelry@>
wrote:

Anyone have nutritional info on soybean meal?
Aren't soybeans high in plant estrogens? Do we need to worry about
that with Cushings?
They can interfere with thyroid function.

And are all soybeans now genetically
modified/engineered?
Both types being planted.

S/S is usually in the teens, very high protein (about 50%).

Eleanor


Re: Alert- -More stuff in ODTB cubes

Cindy McGinley
 

"briarskingstonnet" <briars@...> wrote:

The best thing to do is contact Aurelio.I forget his contact email,sorry,but google Ontario Dehy and it'll be there.

ahenriques@...

- C, A, et. al. in NY


Re: How to feed for low blood sugar levels.

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "ovelind"
<SwedishHoofSchool@...> wrote:

Today I actually believe that it is more
important how they eat than what they eat.
In terms of nutrient delivery per hour there's a lot of truth to that.
Even hay is a "concentrate" compared to grass since it's roughly 90%
dry matter compared to less than 20% for fresh grass.

Horses with constant access to hay also have much steadier insulins
throughout the day and digestive efficiency is improved.

That said, if the horse is insulin resistant you still need to be
careful of the sugar and starch content.

Eleanor

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