Date   

Re: Need help reading hay analysis, feeding IR mule and donkeys. Protein seems high

Lorna Cane
 

Hi Karen,

You can discuss the details with whoever is able to do your balancing for you.

We ask all our members to sign their name,add their location an date of joining to their signature on every post.
You joined in 2006.

Thanks for helping us ( and yourself) out with this.


Lorna in Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002
*See What Works in Equine Nutrition*
http://www.ecirhorse.com/images/stories/Success_Story_3_-Ollies_Story__updated.pdf

https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup

Support the ECIR Group while you shop. It's easy.  

http://www.iGive.com/EquineCushingsandInsulinResistanceGroupInc






Re: IR donkey needs a new home

Diane Schneider
 

Hi Mary!  I told Abby I should ask you if you wanted him but I think she said you asked her if I wanted yours!  I could check with the rescue but I really want him to go to a preexisting IR home.  I am hoping someday someone on here will see my post and be looking for a nice donkey to keep their horse or donkey company.

Diane


Re: Need help reading hay analysis, feeding IR mule and donkeys. Protein seems high

ket62@...
 

How can I find which person might be in my area so we are both knowledge of our environment?


More Pergolide Dose Advise

CHRIS HULKA
 

Hello,

 

I’m back looking for some additional information on where I’m at and where I should be headed with my pergolide dosing.  Case history is not attached but here are the basics:

 

17 yr old Mustang - Frankie

Diagnosed with PPID 7/14/14 at 174 ACTH from Cornell.

Immediately started pergolide at 1mg and retested 8/19/14.  Result was ACTH 73.8 at the 1mg dose.

Started upping dose to 3mg.  Tested again 9/23/14 after 24 days at 3mg with a result of 36.8 pg/ml.  All testing from Cornell.

 

I’m looking to see where to go from here.  Thank you

 

Chris

San Marcos/San Diego, CA

 


Re: Hoof Experts comments please….

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Gloria,


Kudos to you for trying to help in this situation.


You are spot-on about the trim. It is never too soon to get the hoof capsule realigned to the internal structures. In fact, the sooner it is done, the better because you don't lose time growing compromised hoof wall and connections that will then need to be corrected for while they grow out. For the life of me I cannot understand why vets/farriers advise waiting when there are documented trim issues. The longer you wait the worse the situation becomes as long toes and underrun heels tend to take on a life of their own. They will defy all attempts to rein them in if those attempts are half-hearted, slow and/or conservative.


When toes are too long the laminar connections take a hit with every step the horse takes. Once the connections have been torn due to a rotation/founder, this long toe is tearing at the same connections that are already severely damaged and fragile. If the heels are also underrun then the weight of the horse is not centered correctly over the bony column and the tendons and ligaments are also being over stretched at all times. It's a train wreck in the making.


As long as the horse is not on NSAIDs that are masking pain, turnout in a level area for gentle self exercise is ideal. No forced exercise until there is at least 1/3 to 1/2 of the hoof capsule that has regrown correctly.


Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team






 


Re: Need help reading hay analysis, feeding IR mule and donkeys. Protein seems high

Nancy C
 

Hi Karen

Please check out the file, Getting Help with Mineral Balancing.

Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance

 

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup
Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc.

 





Need help reading hay analysis, feeding IR mule and donkeys. Protein seems high

ket62@...
 

FORAGE TESTING LABORATORY           ------------------------ ---- ---- --------

DAIRY ONE, INC.                    |Sample Description      |Farm|Code| Sample |

730 WARREN ROAD                    |ALFALFA CUBES           |    |106 |20875880|

ITHACA, NEW YORK 14850             |------------------------ ---- ---- --------|

607-257-1272    (fax 607-257-1350) |    MIXED CUBE HAY                         |

                                  |-------------------------------------------|

-------- -------- -------- -- --  |              Analysis Results             |

|Sampled | Recvd  |Printed |ST|CO| |------------------------- -------- --------|

|        |09/26/14|09/26/14|  |  | |       Components        | As Fed |   DM   |

-------- -------- -------- -- --  |------------------------- -------- --------|

   MIXED CUBE HAY                 |% Moisture               |   6.4  |        |

KAREN NUNES                        |% Dry Matter             |  93.7  |        |

4932 W 7000 N                      |% Crude Protein          |  16.4  |  17.5  |

CEDAR CITY, UT 84721               |% Available Protein      |  15.0  |  16.0  |

                                  |% ADICP                  |   1.4  |   1.5  |

                                  |% Adjusted Crude Protein |  15.9  |  17.0  |

  -------------------------       |Soluble Protein % CP     |        |  41    |

   ENERGY TABLE - NRC 2001        |Degradable Protein%CP    |        |  66    |

  -------------------------       |% NDICP                  |   1.9  |   2.0  |

           Mcal/Lb  Mcal/Kg       |% Acid Detergent Fiber   |  33.5  |  35.8  |

           -------  -------       |% Neutral Detergent Fiber|  46.3  |  49.4  |

  DE, 1X      0.97     2.14       |% Lignin                 |   5.8  |   6.2  |

  ME, 1X      0.77     1.71       |% NFC                    |   9.5  |  10.2  |

  NEL, 3X     0.41     0.91       |% Starch                 |    .2  |    .2  |

  NEM, 3X     0.41     0.91       |% WSC (Water Sol. Carbs.)|   6.3  |   6.7  |

  NEG, 3X     0.17     0.37       |% ESC (Simple Sugars)    |   4.3  |   4.6  |

  -------------------------       |% Crude Fat              |   1.8  |   1.9  |

  TDN1X, %      46                |% Ash                    |  19.69 |  21.02 |

  -------------------------       |% TDN                    |  43    |  46    |

                                  |NEL, Mcal/Lb             |    .42 |    .45 |

                                  |NEM, Mcal/Lb             |    .32 |    .34 |

                                  |NEG, Mcal/Lb             |    .09 |    .10 |

                                  |Relative Feed Value      |        | 115    |

                                  |% Calcium                |   1.30 |   1.39 |

                                  |% Phosphorus             |    .16 |    .17 |

                                  |% Magnesium              |    .30 |    .32 |

                                  |% Potassium              |   2.46 |   2.63 |

                                  |% Sulfur                 |    .34 |    .36 |

                                  |% Chloride Ion           |   1.25 |   1.34 |

                                  |                         |        |        |

                                  |% Lysine                 |    .83 |    .89 |

                                  |% Methionine             |    .26 |    .27 |

                                  |                         |        |        |

                                  |Horse DE, Mcal/Lb        |    .72 |    .77 |

                                  |                         |        |        |

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                                                                    Page 1

Report 1C

Run: 9/26/2014   3:38:57PM

Page 1



Change dose?

Bonnie
 

My pony Lad has an ACTH of 20.6 pmol/L in July when on 12 mg of pergolide. He is now at 15.5 pmol/L and has been on 24 mg of pergolide since August. Note the testing was done at University of Guelph labs which use a range of 2-10 pmol/L.


He is doing very well: former summertime skin problems eliminated this year, appetite good, attitude, feet.  There have been no side effects whatsoever from pergolide.


I don't want to get into trouble though. The vet technician noted in an email "no dose changes" but I sent an email to my vet to ask for details. 


Is the decline in "the rise" coming soon enough to keep at 24 mgs? What has been the experience of those with animals on doses this high?


Bonnie Ivey, Ontario 12/08

    ECHistory6

 


Re: Thin IR/Cushings horse

Nancy C
 

Apologies......forgot signature.....

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup
Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc.

 





---In EquineCushings@..., <threecatfarm@...> wrote :

Hi Mary

Weight issues could be from a lot of things. In ability to chew well, deworming, ulcers, uncontrolled IR, uncontrolled PPID, insufficient calories/protein in the hay, other undiagnosed issues.  This annual laminitis attack suggests you have uncontrolled IR and/or PPID. 



Re: Thin IR/Cushings horse

Nancy C
 

Hi Mary

Weight issues could be from a lot of things. In ability to chew well, deworming, ulcers, uncontrolled IR, uncontrolled PPID, insufficient calories/protein in the hay, other undiagnosed issues.  This annual laminitis attack suggests you have uncontrolled IR and/or PPID. 

Lots you could do to you diet too. Would drop the rice bran oil as a start. 

When was his last blood work? Would you please join ECHistory 8 and fill out a Case History?

Yahoo! Groups

 

Here's a recent article from Dr Kellon
TOPLINE

 





---In EquineCushings@..., <clancy0404@...> wrote :

 He has 24/7 access to low starch/sugar hay. He gets about 3 - 4 hours grazing time with a muzzle on. He is not stalled but has access to good shelter in the barn.
He currently recovering from his annual last week of July lamintis attack. He was on beet pulp, hay pellets, cocasoya and Remission at that time. No pasture the previous week.



Re: IR donkey needs a new home

Goldy
 

Oh Diane! I was going to ask you if you wanted 2 more donkeys.
I boarded Abby Petersons horse at one time. Seems like ages ago now.
I really wish I could help you out and take Longears. I have been having fibromyalgia problems the last 6 years and can barely take care of my guys.
Have you checked out Crossroads Donkey Rescue? They are in MI.

Mary Goldy


Hoof Experts comments please….

verrecchiodvm@...
 

I am now working on diet and management with someone whose 20 year old horse had "laminitis" almost a year ago  (X-rays almost normal) and now again late July/early August.  This horse had blood work done a year ago and owner was told that "insulin and glucose and ACTH were normal".  I used those results and the G:I ratio says horse was IR at that time.   Owner contacted me mid-September. The horse was being kept in a stall and fed soaked hay, plus a generic mineral mix.  Horse is still overweight with crusty neck/fat deposits. He no longer has digital pulses or heat in his hoofs and current farrier has no difficulty with horse to stand for trimming.  Horse is now being fed tested hay with balanced minerals, Flax, Vit E, etc and APF and for past 2 weeks is doing really well. When farrier last there just before my visit, horse did not seem positive to hoof testers.   And when I checked, horse very minor response at toe, and toes too long for having just been trimmed.  Owner told me farrier was coming every 2 weeks and planned to take toe back slowly.  Based on history and hoof testers and how well horse moved that day, I recommended he be put in small dry lot in his soft rides so he could move around for at least a few hours each day.  A week ago, farrier was back, and again horse comfortable and moving well in dry lot. So I told owner she could take short walks in soft rides as long as horse was willing and wanted to move and no pulses.  Owner told me horse was "practically" dragging her during walks. Hauled and hour to the attending vet and X-rays were done yesterday which show rotation in both fronts; R a bit worse than L.  Owner says "5mm" on R according to DVM reading rads and comparing them to those from a year ago. Horse Positive to hoof testers at toe, but no where else on foot.  DVM advising to put back in stall and not to trim him, just bring him back in 6 weeks to re-evaluate with more x-rays. Owner quite upset and thinks horse is toast because of rotation.  I'm saying that many horses on this list have overcome rotation with the proper diet, trim etc.  



My question for those of you who deal with this all the time….

I have forwarded the ECIR.org link for the realigning Trim and ddt-exercise links to owner. To my way of thinking, as long as this horse is comfortable he should be moving on his own at least, but that he won't get better unless his hoof capsule is trimmed into re-alignment with the coffin bone.  Is it too soon after this laminitic bout to start trimming this horse to shorten the toe and move the heel back?  This horse hoof looks a lot like the 2nd photo in the realigning trim paper.  X-rays of right front very close to that shown on last page.

I will be seeing this horse again today, the owner found more hay and wants that tested.


Thank you for any help for this owner.  I would like to help this horse, attending DVM is very reputable but not sure this is best for horse?



Gloria, member since 2009

SC, NRCplus, NAT, NPH




 


Re: Diarrhea from starting new hay;

Nancy C
 

Hi Carol and Bob

Don't have a lot of the answers but wanted to share my experience with Propionic acid preservative.  My grower stated using it when we had a year of heavy rain and he had to take back a lot of hay that was coming in "dusty" and downright moldy.

Propionic acid is used to ferment fiber in the large intestine  (more info in the message archives.) In our set up, moisture in the hay is measured as it is being baled and the conditioner is sprayed on only when a certain level is reached.  IME, it varied in different parts of any given field.  Grower does not want to use it indiscriminately as it would just be a waste.

Fed hay two years ago with this conditioner without incident.

Dr Kellon has indicated it does introduce more acidity into the gut which could make iron more readily absorbed but only  concern perhaps for iron overloaded horses. Not sure about diarrhea.  Could not find a reference here.

It would be perfect if you could ask the grower, Carol but that info may not be available.  Not sure how it would be reflected in a hay test, Bob.  Maybe drop Equi-analytical a line.

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup
Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc.

 








---In EquineCushings@..., <paulah@...> wrote :

Hi Carol,
In case you haven't sorted this out, I would be very concerned about feeding this hay.  It burned your skin and gave your horses diarrhea.


Re: Diarrhea from starting new hay;

paulah@...
 

Hi Carol,
In case you haven't sorted this out, I would be very concerned about feeding this hay.  It burned your skin and gave your horses diarrhea.  Sugar and minerals don't mean a thing if you have a hay that is either physically irritating or actually toxic.  I would put them on something safe while I figured out what to do.  If you already own the hay, you would do well do find out what is going on or ask the seller to take it back due to the extreme problems.
Good luck and hang in there!
--Paula
Bucks Co., PA


Thin IR/Cushings horse

Goldy
 

Maybe I missed it but I have been searching for info on how to put weight back on my horse.
He is very thin and at age 25, I do not want him going into winter not carrying a proper weight.
He used to be a very easy keeper with fat pads even when being ridden regularly.
He is a very picky eater now. Sometimes he will eat his meals with no fuss, other times he will dump it on the ground and refuse to eat it.So I have to vary his diet quite a bit.
Currently he is fed 3 times a day gets currently gets the following:
1 lb McCauleys Alum 3/day
1/2 lb of timothy/alfalfa pellets 3/day
1/2 cup of rice bran oil 3/day
Heiro hoof supplement  1/day
1 Tbs White Willow Bark 2/day
1/3 cup flax seed 3/day
Hylauronic acid powder

Right now he refuses to eat Beet Pulp, anything that is too mushy, Cocasoya, Wellsolve LS,
and sometimes anything in the above list of current feed. He chokes on Safechoice whether dry or wet.
His teeth are in very good condition, He has 24/7 access to low starch/sugar hay. He gets about 3 - 4 hours grazing time with a muzzle on. He is not stalled but has access to good shelter in the barn.
He currently recovering from his annual last week of July lamintis attack. He was on beet pulp, hay pellets, cocasoya and Remission at that time. No pasture the previous week.

I have been off list for a long time and I am sure I have missed a lot. Clancy had been doing well until this last year. I have not. I have my own health issues.
He is still bright eyed and interested in life but unridable due to compromised hooves and arthritis.
Regards,
Mary Goldy


IR donkey needs a new home

Diane Schneider
 

I posted about this before but I got no response so I will just keep posting periodically hoping someone will see it that would like a donkey or as a companion for their horse who is already doing the IR protocol. Longears is a 12 hand standard donkey, originally a wild/feral BLM burro, now very gentle. I have had him since he was a yearling and he is 18 now. He has foundered but is now sound and I am riding him. I am in Michigan but I am willing to deliver him to almost anywhere for the right home. I no longer have any horses so he is now alone and needs a companion and I am getting out of animals.

Diane


Re: Just learned my mare is IR/cushinoid

Maggie
 

Hi Tracy,

Welcome to the group!  You will find a wealth of information and support here about how to take care of your mare.  Sorry to hear that you're having trouble accessing that file.  Try this: 
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/files/%201%20START%20HERE%21%21%21/  That's the "start here" file, and will give you a good solid amount of information.  Also, our website contains a great deal of information and is a great place to send your vet if he/she needs some updated information about Cushing's (PPID) and IR.  Here's the link:  http://ecirhorse.org/  So, you've lots and lots to read!!  Prepare yourself for a whole different way of horsekeeping to maintain your PPID/IR mare in optimal health!  To help you the best, we need to get a some more details about your mare.  Here's a link to join ECH8, our sister site where we store the case histories.  If you would fill out a CH and let us know when you've got it done, that would be great!  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/info  It's just a storage site, keep conversation on this main list.

Our philosophy is called DDT/E, which stands for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.  All 4 aspects must be in place to see optimal results.  You have a diagnosis of both PPID and IR.  This is a common time of year for PPID horses to have symptoms due to the "seasonal rise", a period of time when all horses have a natural rise in their ACTH, but PPID horses have an exaggerated and often prolonged rise in theirs. You can read more about the seasonal rise on our website.http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/cushing-s-disease/seasonal-rise  It's great to hear that your mare is not having any symptoms other than the puffy eyes.  Have you started her on pergolide yet?  This is the medicine that treats PPID.  We recommend that you wean her onto it slowly, starting with 0.25mg for 3 or 4 days and increasing it by 0.25mg every 3 or 4 days until you reach your target dose.  This helps to avoid the "pergolide veil", (depression, lack of appetite) that some, but not all horses have when starting on the medicine. 

Another great thing that helps with the pergolide veil is a product called APF.  It's an a adaptogen and is available at many local and online tack/feed stores now, and also on their website:  http://www.auburnlabs.com/html/eqProdGen.html  Once at your target dose for 2 weeks, we recommend retesting to make sure your ACTH has come into the optimal range.  PPID is a progressive disease and the ACTH is not a stagnant number.  The goal is to keep it in the middle of the normal range.  Here is a great post by Patti that can help you by using the subtle symptoms to determine if you are at your target dose:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/conversations/messages/111988  When you retest, recommend you add a leptin to your ACTH, insulin, and glucose.  Those are the 4 tests we recommend for a complete diagnosis.  The leptin helps to determine if you mare is IR at baseline, or if the elevated ACTH is driving the insulin level up.  It would be no surprise if she is IR at baseline since Arabians are one of the breeds in which IR is commonly found.

Since your mare is also IR, her new Diet will be supremely important as well.  The diet that an IR horse needs is low sugar/starch hay, tested to be under 10% sugar+starch, and low fat (under 4%) with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay.  She will also need salt added and to replace the fragile ingredients lost in hay curing, she needs Vitamin E, and ground flax seed.  The proper amounts of all these ingredients can be found on our website, under "diet."  Just as important, if not more, is what you don't feed her anymore!  No pasture, no high sugar treats, including apples and carrots.  No red/brown salt blocks.  You are going to want to start the "emergency diet" now.  You'll be feeding her 1.5 to 2% of her BW in hay.  If you haven't had your hay tested, you need to soak her hay for 60 minutes in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water to remove up to ~30% of the sugar content.  Add the other ingredients in the emergency diet (salt, Vit E, ground flax seed, magnesium) in weight appropriate amounts.  The details can be found here:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-diet  Hopefully, once you get your hay tested, you will able to stop soaking her hay.  Our goal is always to find low sugar starch hay so we can stop soaking!  We have lots of other members in Maine, so maybe someone can hook you up with a good source of low sugar/starch hay!

Ok, the Trim.  Your mare has not had laminitis, and that's great!  The trim must still be optimal!  Toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures.  If you'd like, you are welcome to post pictures of your horses feet in the PHOTOS section of ECH8 so one of our hoof gurus can take a look and see if you have the most optimal trim in place.  Here's a site that shows how to take great hoof photos:  http://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/good-hoof-photos.html

And last but definitely not least, Exercise!  The best IR buster there is!  But a laminitic horse should never be forced to move!  You are so lucky to have a diagnosis and are able to begin treatment before your mare had to experience the pain of laminitis!  Many, many horse owners find us when they are already in that desperate situation.  The best way to avoid that is to get all four aspects of our philosophy in place asap!  I've given you a lot of information and resources, not in attempt to overwhelm you :), but so that you can get the knowledge that you need to take the best care of your mare!  You should peruse our files and website, but if you have any questions, just ask!  We are here to help you help your horse!  Thanks for signing your name and general location. We ask everyone to also add their date of joining and also, once you get it done, a link to your CH, so your signature will eventually look similar to mine below.

Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA
March 2011
EC Primary Response
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory4/files/maggie%20in%20virginia/

 

 


Re: Serum Amyloid A

gentpony
 

Hi Laura,

Just wanted to let you know I could now open your new bloodwork file, so hopefully you'll get some helpful feedback soon!

One comment: since P is so athletic, you might want to ask to include sodium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium on your next biochemistry panel. Hopefully this is available in a package so it is cost-effective.
This would help you to assess electrolytes, hydration level, and magnesium for immunity/muscle function.  I found this helpful for our situation.  We always requested the broadest biochemistry panel available, which was not much more costly.  This gave us so much information, and great baseline levels over the years that proved valuable when things did go wrong.

With bloodwork, which is a snapshot of a moment in time, it's best to evaluate the results (what are they telling us/ what are the possible causes of such results), compare current results to past bloodwork results (evaluate changes, and reasons for these changes), and use this information to guide the treatment of any symptoms, or to correct obvious deficiencies. 
 
( I urge everyone to educate themselves in interpreting blood work and not just rely on your vet. Get copies of all that bloodwork you have paid for.  As shocking as this may be, unfortunately, we have found that some vets are just as lacking in interpreting basic bloodwork, as they are lacking in the knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of IR and Cushings!  We have thankfully prevented or guided treatment of some disasters by not ignoring blood work results.  Yes, vets are busy, but no one is more interested in the welfare of your horse than your are.)

Laura, maybe to put your mind at some ease, SAA "is" elevated at 233 (no units)...but for comparison, Mel's was a whopping 8692.4 mg/L !   
I've heard that SAA is commonly elevated in mares after they deliver foals, but since we have only geldings, I don't know what those levels might be.

Eva
SW Ontario, March 2005
 


Re: Shawnee is getting worse

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Melanie,


Sorry this took so long. I've added a few mark-ups to Shawnee's photo album:


https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/photos/albums/505715176


How is he doing? As I mentioned before, really need to make sure that nothing is removed from the front half of the soles as these areas are presently very thin, much thinner than they should be. Need to concentrate on backing the toes without removing height from the bottom of the foot. This seems to be a concept that many hoof care professionals just can't wrap their heads around. In their efforts to keep a hoof capsule looking like the image they have in their heads of what it "should" look like, they lose sight of what needs to be done to keep it functioning as it should. Function needs to trump looks here. Would also suggest being a bit less aggressive in trimming the frog by limiting trimming to any flaps of dead, exfoliating material.


RF lateral: The area that is marked in red is what Linda and I are referring to when we say do not rasp the dorsal wall. Rasping in this area is a cosmetic effort that results in the wall being thinned where it is already compromised. Thicker/heavier growth rings and laminar wedge material are visible examples of areas of disruptions in the connections between the hoof wall and the coffin bone. Erasing them with a rasp just removes layers of hoof wall that are adding structural stability to the compromised structures that aren't as strong as healthy hoof wall.


LF Sole: The pink is where the heel buttresses are now. Yellow is where they should be located, even with the widest part of the frog. Notice that the medial one is further forward than the lateral so needs to be brought back further. The blue circle is an area of overgrown bar and sole that is starting to flake off. That excess actually flows all the way back to the heel-bar triangle on that side. The green line is where to back the toe to. The area outlined in RED is where nothing should be removed. The sole in this area is bruised and angry looking and the imprint from the leading edge of the coffin bone is just barely visible as a crescent shape. Padding the sole, maybe cutting out a half-moon hole to relieve all pressure in this area, should provide added relief until the sole has time to thicken.


RF Medial: Yellow is where to back the toe.


Always want to keep in mind that although there appears to be a lot of excess height in the walls, there really isn't due to the distal descent (sinking). The best way to deal with that is to back the toes to get the breakover aligned with where the coffin bone wants to break over and leave the sole depth untouched to provide as much protection and support as possible.


Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team





Re: Pony in oregon hoof advice heads up..

Deb Funderburk <hawkhilldeb@...>
 

Hi Julie-- I'm eagerly waiting for Pony's update. Yours is one of the cases I've been following for pointers for Cory. Good to hear she's doing well.

Deb and Cory in NC
July 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory5/files/Deb%20Funderburk%20in%20NC/
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHistory5/photos/albums/1275105710

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