Date   

Re: update on princess.... sue & princess..

Teri
 

Hi Sue,

<<<I am changing the vet wrap, gauze and putting iodine  in daily and I notice she still has some discharge in her reg hoof, and a little smell in the club...  
 If anyone knows of something that could help please don't be afraid of letting me know.. maybe I tried it or not and it might help.. 

I might be way off base here...but I had an idea.  Has anyone ever tried medical silver? Last year I had a nasty wound on my lower leg where a lawn ornament 'attacked' me.  :-)   It gouged a big hole in my lower leg and left a dead skin flap covering it.  I had recurrent bouts with cellulitis and the wound was not healing well...and then there was the ugly dead black skin flap.  So my doc sent me to a wound care clinic and they used the medical silver.  The silver they used was infused in a pad....it looked like a piece of gray felt.  The nurse said it is a natural antibiotic and it also gets rid of dead tissue.  She would cut the silver pad to fit on the open areas only and then bandage my leg.  I went twice a week for treatment.  Each time, the dead skin flap got smaller and smaller...which meant the piece of silver got bigger and bigger until the dead skin flap was finally gone.   Then I was left with an open wound which was completely covered with the silver.  So then, the wound got smaller and smaller, and so did the pieces of silver, until it was healed.  This whole process took about 4 months!   I never got cellulitis again this whole time either.   
Didn't know if this might work on horses, too. 
(The product they used on me was called Aquacel Extra Ag) 

Best of luck to you and your lovely Princess.  You and Corinne are my heroes!  Your dedication to your horses is awe inspiring and heart warming!

Teri and Kelsey (and angel Stormy)
Indy 2012


Re: Advise on hay with a high starch %

gypsylassie
 

Thanks

Sent from my iPhone


Re: new to the group and looking for help with IR and laminitis

Maggie
 

Hi Vicki,

You are most welcome!  

Good to know that you've stopped the sugary treats and grazing.  I thought you may have, but wanted to make sure.  In rereading my note to you , it appears that I combined 2 thoughts:  "Stop the Equalizer.  It contains yucca, which you want to avoid in IR horses."  Sorry.  I meant to say stop the Equalizer.  It contains riboflavin, thiamin and niacin which should be avoided in IR horses.  And stop the Buteless, as it contains yucca and should be avoided in IR horses.  Definitely stop the Calm and Cool--way too high in sugar and starch. Great that you are stopping the Red Cell.  Here's a link to our Iron Overload file for further reading:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/files/Iron%2C%20Iron%20Testing%2C%20Iron%20Overload/ 
 
There are a few options for low carb feeds to use as a carrier for your vitamins and minerals.  Lots of us use dampened Ontario Dehy Timothy Balance cubes (ODTB's).  They are Timothy hay cubes, guaranteed to be below 10% sugar and starch and are balanced according to Dr. Kellon's specifications.  They can actually be used as a complete feed, needing only the addition of salt, ground flax seed and Vitamin E.  
 
There is also Nuzu Stabul1, which is available through Tractor Supply stores.  If you have a TSC near you, Randy from Nuzu feeds has been really good about working with the stores to get them to order the product.  If you want to look into that option, let us know and we can guide you further.  Do you have a Southern States near you?  That's where I get my ODTB's.  Anyone that carries Triple Crown products should be able to get ODTB's for you.

The very best way to feed Samson is to test his hay and have the excesses and deficiencies balanced, but there are some acceptable concentrates that can come close to balancing your hay.  California Trace (http://www.californiatrace.com/ )  and Arizona copper complete (available through HorseTech http://www.horsetech.com/popular-customs.html ) are 2 options, but only testing your hay will tell you how close they come to balancing it.  Most hays are deficient in copper and zinc (and magnesium).  And high in iron.  Once you get your hay tested, you can contact one of our "balancers" to balance your diet.  First file in this folder is a list of the members who do that:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/files/7%20Help%20with%20Mineral%20Balancing/   
 
So, the answer to your question "Would it be beneficial to add copper to Samson's diet?" is most likely "Yes"  But the minerals must be added in the proper ratios, and that's why hay testing is so important--in addition, of course, to finding out the ESC+starch content.
 
Completely understand how the boarding situation makes soaking hay and rinse/soak/rinsing beet pulp difficult.  Look here for more information on hay:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/files/Hay%20Information/  And here's a site where you can search for hay in your area:  http://www.hayexchange.com/ga.php  Some hay growers do an analysis, so you could look for that.  You have to register to see the details, but there is no cost to register.  Maybe someone else in your area will chime in here with a hay source for you.  You might also look in our member database and see if there is anyone in your area:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/database/12/edit 

What I do, when I am getting ready to buy my hay for the year, is send a sample to Equi Analytical (http://equi-analytical.com/ ) and order just the sugar (ESC) and starch.  Once I know the hay is acceptable (less than 10% sugar+starch), I buy the hay and add the rest of test, #603 trainer's package for a total of $54.  There is no extra cost involved in testing the sugar and starch first and then adding the remainder of the #603.  Unless, of course, the hay comes back too high in sugar and/or starch and you decide not to purchase it.  
 
Some ideas that people have used to make feeding "special" hay to their boarded horses:
1) Testing, buying and storing hay at their home.  You can purchase small mesh hay nets (smhn's) which, BTW, are great for slowing down that ravenous appetite, and put Samson's allotted amount of hay (1.5-2% of his BW) into several nets and have them ready for the barn owner to deliver to him.
2) Ask the barn owner if there is a spot where you can store your tested hay, and reserve it's use for only Samson.
 
Hmmm....I'm sure there are more ideas, but I am in a bit of a rush right now and need to run.  Hope that helps!
 
Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA



From: "vickymonen@... [EquineCushings]"
To: EquineCushings@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2015 6:20:03 AM
Subject: Re: [EquineCushings] new to the group and looking for help with IR and laminitis

 

Hi,

 

Thank you so much for all the information.

 

I believe I made a mistake on my history as I put things that I had done prior to the Diagnosis of IR,  like bad treats and the 27/7 grass turnout.  All this has been stopped since July 2015 and he is on a very restricted diet. 


 Is there any low starch/low carb feed concentrate that is at all acceptable to feed to get the horses vitamins and minerals in.   The barn I am at, is a very small private boarding place and getting them to soak the hay, or even soak beet pulp, will be difficult if at all possible.

 

My question right now is, I know that our geographical area  is low in copper and I had to supplement a previous horse with copper which he was deficient in.

 

Would it be beneficial to add the copper to Samsons diet?

 

I am stopping the red cell immediately. 

 

Is there anyone from Georgia that has had success in finding a good hay source with good 10% or less results? 

 

Thanks again,

 

Vicky Monen and Samson

Ga, Aug 2015

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/files/Vicky%20and%20Samson/
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHoof/photos/albums/1698376942

 



Re: Advise on hay with a high starch %

lars_a_swe
 

---In EquineCushings@..., <lcknie@...> wrote :

Is there any "rule of thumb" for starch on how high is too high when the total s/s is below 10%?  Any advice is very appreciated.


- - - - - -


You can calculate the equivalent glucose value for your hay. I am using the following "rule of thumb":


0.5 x ESC (DM) + Starch (DM) < 6.5 %


Lars




Re: new to the group and looking for help with IR and laminitis

vicky monen
 

Hi,

 

Thank you so much for all the information.

 

I believe I made a mistake on my history as I put things that I had done prior to the Diagnosis of IR,  like bad treats and the 27/7 grass turnout.  All this has been stopped since July 2015 and he is on a very restricted diet. 


 Is there any low starch/low carb feed concentrate that is at all acceptable to feed to get the horses vitamins and minerals in.   The barn I am at, is a very small private boarding place and getting them to soak the hay, or even soak beet pulp, will be difficult if at all possible.

 

My question right now is, I know that our geographical area  is low in copper and I had to supplement a previous horse with copper which he was deficient in.

 

Would it be beneficial to add the copper to Samsons diet?

 

I am stopping the red cell immediately. 

 

Is there anyone from Georgia that has had success in finding a good hay source with good 10% or less results? 

 

Thanks again,

 

Vicky Monen and Samson

Ga, Aug 2015

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/files/Vicky%20and%20Samson/
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHoof/photos/albums/1698376942

 


Manure color and shape and timothy pellets

lj friedman
 

Jesse eats only timothy pellets.. Lately. I;ve noticed his manure isnt like the other horses.. Its not well formed and its color is dark.. very dark brown.. Honestly. I dont remember how his manure looked before he started eating the tim only pellets and I also dont remember when it changed ? . anyone have similar scenario?   I do have the vet coming out tomorrow for another horse and will ask him to have a look see.   lj friedman san diego nov 2014


ECHistory8



Advise on hay with a high starch %

gypsylassie
 

Finding decent grass hay has been a challenge for the last 2 years.   I've been feeding a mix of 6 different sources and all have been full of stuff I have to sort out. (thistle, clover, alfalfa, milkweed, nightshade, etc.)

This year I bought some fairly clean hay that came back with a total  s/s of 7% with a starch of 4.30%.   Now I'm looking at a hay with s/s at 8.34% with a starch of 3.68%.  It makes me nervous, but there just has not been any decent grass hay around here. And most of the samples I'm running over to get tested keep coming back above 10%.  I was thinking of buying some of the 8.34% hay just to have some more hay in the barn to use as a mix in.  And am hoping some more hay with lower numbers will become available.  The boys are doing well and seem to be able to handle hay that comes close to the upper limit, but I know a high starch % is not good, the way it converts 100% to glucose.

Is there any "rule of thumb" for starch on how high is too high when the total s/s is below 10%?  Any advice is very appreciated.  It's been a long 16 mnths with husb health crises and taking hours every day to sort thru hay for feeding the boys, but I'm thankful they are doing OK.  Thanks

Laura K. Chappie & Beau

N IL 2011


Re: new to the group and looking for help with IR and laminitis

Maggie
 

Hi Vicki!

Welcome to the group!  And thank you for filling out a case history on Samson!  It really gives us the details that we need to give you the best help.  Here is a link to your CH folder:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/files/Vicky%20and%20Samson/   If you can please copy and paste it to your signature each time that you post, it really helps us to find it faster and be able to answer your questions faster!  I looked at your CH and your pictures (here's a link to your pictures which you can include in your signature as well:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHoof/photos/albums/1698376942)  Haflinger's could be one of the poster children for IR, so I'm not surprised that you ran into some trouble with him.  But you are already moving in the right direction with him and I know we can help you even further.

You may have read by now that we follow a philosophy called DDT/E, short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.  As I explain each part I will address your concerns.

Diagnosis:  So you have a diagnosis of IR.  It appears from your lab work that Samson is does not have Cushing's (PPID).  At the age of 10, he is on the borderline of the age when we start to need to be more aware of the development of PPID as well.  Right now, let's concentrate on the IR.  Your boy looks like the classic IR horse with fat pads, cresty neck, laminitis, and like I said, just being a Haflinger puts him in the "at risk" category for IR.  As you move forward with him, the next time you have labs drawn, we like to send the blood to Cornell, as we have found them to have the most accurate results and also they are the only ones that do a leptin level.  Leptin is a hormone that says "stop eating" and most IR horses are also leptin resistant, so have elevated leptin levels, causing that "ravenous appetite" that is so common in IR horses.  The leptin is also useful for helping to differentiate if a horse is insulin resistant at baseline, or if an elevated ACTH is driving the insulin up.  

For future labs, the 4 tests you want are ACTH, insulin, glucose and leptin.  Make sure Sampson is not fasting prior to the lab draw.  He should have tested low sugar starch (less than 10% sugar + starch) hay in front of him right up until the draw time.  If the hay is untested it needs to be soaked (details to follow in the Diet part)  Your vet will need to have an account at Cornell, and make sure he knows about the reduced overnight shipping.  All of the information you need to know about blood testing can be found on our website here:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-diagnosis 

Diet:  The diet that we recommend is a low sugar/starch (less than 10% sugar+starch) low fat (4% or less), mineral balanced diet.  We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% sugar + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E.  This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse.  Until you can get your hay tested and balanced, we recommend that you use the Emergency Diet.  More details about the emergency diet can be found on our website here:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-diet  It does involve soaking your hay for 30 minutes in hot water or 60 minutes in cold water to remove an average of 30% of the sugar content.  Make sure you dump the sugary soaking water where the horse(s) can't get to it.  

As important as what you DO feed is what you DON'T feed!  No grazing!  No sugary treats including apples and carrots.  No molasses containing products.  No red/brown salt blocks--white only. I may be mistaken, but in looking at your CH, it appears that you are giving Sampson apples, carrots, sugar cubes and granola bars, and that he is grazing 9 hours/day.  If so, you need to stop all of that!  The goal is to eliminate any possible triggers from his diet and also to get his trim optimal so the he can heal.  Stop the Seminole Cool and Calm.  It contains 13% starch and 9% sugar.  It also contains some ingredients we want to avoid in IR horses (riboflavin, thiamin and niacin) Stop the Equalizer.  It contains yucca, which you want to avoid in IR horses.  Stop the Red Cell. IR and iron overload go hand in hand.  Horses get plenty of iron in there diets (dirt), in fact more than they need, and do not need additional iron.  What joint supplement are you giving?  MSM and glucosamine should be avoided in IR horses.

Trim:  A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot.  It's often the last piece of the puzzle to fall into place in getting a laminitic horse comfortable.  Thank you for posting pictures and xrays of Samson's feet.  Our hoof guru can evaluate your trim and do some mark ups for you and/or your farrier for guidance with a rehab trim.  Please visit this site to see how to get the best hoof pictures:  http://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/good-hoof-photos.html   

Exercise:  The BEST IR buster there is!  But a laminitic horse should never be forced to move!  No horse who is on anti inflammatory medications for laminiitis should be exercised.  The medication can mask pain allowing the horse to do more than he should causing more damage to the laminae.  In fact, we don't recommend the use of NSAIDS after the first 3 or 4 days as they can interfere with healing.  For more information, read here:  http://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/good-hoof-photos.html  and also here for more information on a realigning trim:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/laminitis/realigning-trim   It does take 9 months to a year from the time the trim is correct to grow out a new healthy foot.  Exercise should only be started when the horse is willing to move (off of NSAIDS) at liberty.  Hand walking in long straight lines with no tight turns is recommended.  Tight turns can do further damage to the fragile new laminae.  Shoes or no shoes the trim must be correct.  We do recommend barefoot during the rehab period so that more frequent trimming can be done.  Boots and pads are generally of great help during the rehab period.  One brand we like is Soft Rides, but there are others that will suit as well.  Here's the Soft Ride site:  https://www.softrideboots.com/  I'm sorry I can't help you with why your vet said that you could ride him except to say that a lot of vets are not up to date with IR and/or PPID.  Maybe you could share our website with your vet.  

OK, Vicki I have given you a LOT of information here and we do know that it can be a bit overwhelming.  We can help you sort through all the details.  Don't hesitate to ask any questions that you have, but do take the time to study all the parts of our website: http://ecirhorse.org/index.php   Just keeping up with the daily posts can be very educational, as can searching the archived messages.  Lots of information on IR in this file:  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EquineCushings/files/Insulin%20Resistance/   Hang in there!  We are here to help you help your boy!

Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA


Re: nonfasting-what to give?

jamsler707@...
 

Hi Pam,
No, that area was all dismantled as soon as Story left.  I blocked the best way to bring the horses into the barn, into their stalls.  I just found out the ODTB cubes will be at least another week.  Maybe next week. 
Julia


Re: Connection between IR and Thyro-L?

Anthie Booras
 

I was thinking about running the leptin test. I'm a vet tech at my equine vet so I can call them myself to do that. They weren't sure if they'd have enough after doing the thyroid panel.

Anthie
California
Aug 2015


Re: Feed for foal of IR mare

Chanda
 

I know metabolic horses are different, but talking with Triple Crown nutritionist, the senior can be interchanged with growth if necessary.  I inquired since I can't readily get growth, but everyone stocks the senior.  Similar profile, except the sugar/starch is lower with the senior, not quite 10%, but under 12%; it might work. 

Chanda

MT 9/04


update on princess.... sue & princess..

sue wolf <wolffarm4@...>
 

Hello everyone,
thanks so much for the input. it really does help..
its so/so if princess is better after the maggots.. some day she is, moving more in her stall and some days the same.. we have not made any steps backwards..YEA..... I am changing the vet wrap, gauze and putting iodine  in daily and I notice she still has some discharge in her reg hoof, and a little smell in the club... I ordered another batch of maggots today..I've come to far not to keep going..  it has made a big difference in cleaning the hoof out but I think there was more than the little maggots could eat..  I'm not going to do the daily photos but I'll due one around the 5 day..  I wish she would walk better but I know there's a lot of damage... now shes starting to make a bigger fuss about the other horses going out before she did just a little but not to much.. so I know shes feeling better.. I wish the weight would come on faster but its going to take time, she eats all the time hay 24/7 and timothy cubes through the day.. we use 1 day a week now with her getting her feed tub full.. when she lays down I make sure she has hay by her nose.. poor girl gets food stuffed in her face all the time.. I would be a blimp if I was her..
I do have soft rides but the clogs are glued on her now and I would like to get them off or lowered some.. she seems to do better with the clogs then she did with the soft rides before.. I'm just second guessing on everything. what ifs and could I be doing something better?!?!?  If anyone knows of something that could help please don't be afraid of letting me know.. maybe I tried it or not and it might help..
keep you updated..thanks
sincerely,
sue & princess
oh 6/11


Re: Diet balancing

Lorna Cane
 



>Finally -- FINALLY -- got enough analyzed hay to make balancing worthwhile. 

Hi Kerry,

Here's the link for 'balancers':

Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance

 

Lorna in Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002


*See What Works in Equine Nutrition*
http://www.ecirhorse.com/images/stories/Success_Story_3_-Ollies_Story__updated.pdf




Diet balancing

 

Hi group,

Finally -- FINALLY -- got enough analyzed hay to make balancing worthwhile. I have the two IRs, one is also PPID. Both very stable at the moment (knock on wood)

Anyone up for the task? I'll definitely pay for your time/expertise. Will send hay analysis and their currents wts/diets/etc.

Lmk if anyone is interested!

Kerry In NY
Sept 2014


Re: Connection between IR and Thyro-L?

 

Hi, only have a second...

Others will post asap abd correct me if Im wrong, but it might be worthwhile to have yr vet call Cornell and add on a leptin test. Cornell -- and most labs -- will hold onto processed blood samples in case add'l tests are requested.

Ill watch list for others' responses.

Kerry in NY
Sept 2014


ECIR Group Inc. 2015 NO Laminitis! Conf - Early bird expires in 30 days!

Nancy C
 

early bird
    1.  humorous
    a person who rises, arrives, or acts before the usual or expected time.

Only 30 days left to get early bird pricing of $250.00 for the ECIR Group Inc. No Laminitis! Conference. After September 23, the price will be $280.00.

The Conference Committee day counter says there are only 73 more days to go! Time if flying. We are planning presentations, hand outs, menus, getting equipment ready, sending out news releases, and many other details to ensure a great event. You can help your hardworking conference committee to prepare the best event possible by registering today.

Attendees are coming from all over the US, Canada and the UK and include owners, trimmers, farriers and veterinary professionals, anyone with one or more horses in their care.

The 2015 NO Laminitis! Conference promises much new material, review of emerging research and case histories. A complete lecture schedule and registration via Pay Pal or check may be found at www.nolaminitis.org.

When: November 6-8, 2015
Where: Georgetown, TX ~ Just outside Austin
Featured Speakers : Eleanor M. Kellon, VMD
    Robert M. Bowker, VMD, PhD
    Kathleen Gustafson, PhD
    Philip J. Johnson, BVSc, MS, DACVIM, DECEIM, MRCVS
    Lavinia Fiscaletti, BA
    Daisy A. Bicking, DEP, APF, CFGP, CLS
    Benjamin R. Buchanan, DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC

Check out the VENUE button at nolaminitis.org for more information on where to stay. Rooms are going fast so reserve now.

If you cannot attend the conference and wish to support the ongoing work of the ECIR Group, please consider a tax deductible donation as a Friend or in remembrance of a special horse.

http://www.nolaminitis.org/index.php/registration/thanks-and-tribute

A big thanks to our growing list of Benefactors for their generous donations for the major 2015 ECIR Group Inc. fund raising event. Please tell these companies you appreciate their support the next time you talk with them or visit their web site. A complete list of Benefactors is available at nolaminitis.org and on ecirhorse.org.
Many will be attending.

Diamond Benefactors
California Trace
Forage Plus
Uckele Health and Nutrition


Platinum Benefactors

Auburn Labs - APF
Soft Ride Boots
Emerald Valley Natural Health
Beet-E-Bites
Hay Chix
EponaShoe


Gold Benefactors
Black Horse Consulting
Horse Tech
My Best Horse
Anderson Feed - Nuzu Feed
Omega Fields
Equicast
Ontario Dehy
Triple Crown
Eco Nets


The 2015 NO Laminitis! Conference will bring attendees the facts about PPID and IR, as well as wonderful opportunity to meet each other, share our stories and discuss hopes for the future of the ECIR Group. It is above all, a great time with great info to benefit the welfare of PPID and IR horses.

Don’t forget! There are 13 hours of AAVSB RACE veterinary continuing ed credits available.*

Register now!

Thanks to all of you who have registered early!!!

The 2015 NO Laminitis! Conference Committee


*This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB RACE program for 13 hours of continuing education in jurisdictions that recognize AAVSB RACE approval. Please contact the AAVSB RACE program if you have any comments/concerns regarding this program's validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession. Participants should be aware that some boards have limitations on the number of hours accepted in certain categories and/or restrictions on certain methods of delivery of continuing education. Contact Nancy Collins ecirgroup1@... for further information.



Feed for foal of IR mare

DawnC
 

My Spanish Andalusian broodmare has been dx IR since 2011 and with the help and advice I have gotten from this group, she has successfully had 2 healthy foals since her diagnosis. Her diet is pretty tight when she does not have a foal by her side but does get extra time in a big field (4 -5 am hours muzzled) when she has a foal so the foal get can more exercise than the small dry lot. Her current 3 month old colt is going to be taller than his dam (16.2) and while I am concerned about OCD & physitis, I've been only letting him eat soaked ODHC which he loves. My usual feed for non IR horses is Legends or Triple Crown and with all the new formulas - Growth, etc., I am hesitant to use concentrates. Is there a safe foal feed? While my mare has never had laminitis, she was in the severe risk category on initial testing and her appetite is still unbelievable - I think she would eat anything. Her mother & half-sister both foundered and I would guess that my mare's offspring will have a chance of becoming IR at some point since Andalusians on an American diet have not fared well.


Any advice will be greatly appreciated!
Thanks.



Dawn & Roma
Middletown, DE
August 2011


Connection between IR and Thyro-L?

Anthie Booras
 

I have a 9 year old Irish Draught Sport Horse mare that has been on Thyro-L for the last 5 years. I've made several unsuccessful attempts to wean her off of it in that time. Recently I've noticed her crest gets larger and harder when seasonal rise occurs, but I increase her Thyro-L to two scoops and the crest is back under control. As spring comes and in to summer I can decrease her Thyro-L and her crest stays happy until the start of seasonal rise again. We ran a TRH response ACTH test, insulin, and glucose last week. My vet found the results unexciting, but I'm not so sure. I'm sure there has to be a connection, but I'm not sure where to go from here. Thanks for any help and hopefully I've attached her case history correctly.

Anthie and Erin


ECHistory8



Re: new to the group and looking for help with IR and laminitis

corrine haffner
 

HI Vicky

Welcome to the group,you'v come to the right place for help. Someone here will soon chime in with all the info you need to start helping your horse. It can be a bit over whelming at first,but does get easier. I'v been down the need help road,i can tell you from experience this is the best place to be :) 

Corrine & Jasper
MN 4/2014





Re: nonfasting-what to give?

Pamela Bramell
 

Julia,

Can you put her in that side of the barn where you had Story?  Just for the day of the testing?  That way she can have hay and she can still move around a good bit.  A lot better then being confined to the stall.  Just an idea.

Pam in Va
Buttercup/Story/Frosty/Shaqiraj
12/10

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