Date   

For your information.....

petersdeni@...
 

Hi all,

Just thought many would be interested in my limited "one rat study!"  Previously all ACTH blood draws on Shalimar have been done in the A.M. (approximately 8:30).  Compounded pergolide dosing has been done in the P.M.  (Between 7 and 8).  Prior to December 2015, Shalimar was at a 3.5mg dose of compounded pergolide.  On a Dec. 1, 2015 blood draw his ACTH came back at 128 from Cornell.  I bumped his dose up a half mg so he was at a 4mg dose once daily in the P.M.  


On March 17, 2016 another A.M. blood draw produced an ACTH of 257 from Cornell.  I decided to follow up with a P.M. blood draw timed 3 hours after his P.M. dose of 4mg compounded Pergolide.  On March 24 that P.M. blood draw resulted in an ACTH of 34.  We are adding an A.M. dose to the equation beginning today.  We are anticipating that a 2mg dose should bring his ACTH back into range.  


Based on the timing and the numbers.........it kind of makes me wonder if dosing 3 - 4 times per day would keep the best control........unfortunately we can't really afford to do that many tests nor would someone be around routinely for that 3rd or 4th dose. 


Just thought you all would be interested .........but I haven't had the time to update my Case history.


Denise 

Shalimar - MN

NRCPlus 1210

joined group about the same time.





Re: More Photos Posted

Karen Turek
 

Thank you again for all the help and information Lavinia!  I took more pictures today and posted them.  The only changes made last week was flair removal from the hoof wall.  

The trimmer was out on Friday to do the other horses and thought the bars needed shaved down so he shaved them down and today prior to taking the pictures I rasped a bevel into some spots on the walls and made a couple of rasps on the heels.  

She is still not moving good today but seemed more comfortable as she didn't mind standing for extended periods on one foot while I worked on the other one.

We had a lot of moisture last week, so I've been putting Durasole on her soles in the hope it will harden them up.  Hence the colorful photos.  

The trimmer had some Easyboot Clouds in his trailer.  They are much lighter and fit her very well.  The pad is wedged but don't have the extreme wedge that the Softrides have.  I understand how the wedge can help a horse built like mine and do have a pad in the gloves but it no where compares to the wedge in the softrides.  

Karen 
Colo Jan-15
 


Re: Horse WILL NOT eat his minerals

 

Thank you, Nancy.  I would love to keep to Dr. Kellon's suggestions but she hasn't told me what to do now that I have new supplements.  I don't know how much beet pulp to feed and I don't know if I should switch to the new minerals and zinc.  So far, he's eating the beet mixture with the old minerals so I'm just hoping I'm not feeding too much beet pulp.  Thanks again.

Val D- TX
ECIR 2016
ECHistory8

 



PPID & Suspensory Ligament problems?

yodinori
 



Hi 

This yahoo group has been a lifesaver for me. -Have one horse (Ivan -23 yr old warmblood) in ECHistory5..


More recently (last two years) my senior Arab (also 23) has been gradually showing more of what I consider early symptoms of PPID (ouchie feet off and on..delayed shedding, loss of topline, poor healing)...but not testing positive...with ACTH test...I have been carefully managing diet and exercise (he is an experienced endurance horse-tough as nails but also a headshaker)...last summer we injured both front suspensories...despite conservative training and by all accounts not doing anything wrong training wise...He has been on a one year healing break...and the whole time I've wondered...could this be another PPID symptom...I've googled and searched this group off and on but found very little to support my hunch...

I just came across the article summary below today at the Getty horse nutrition site. 


Now (even with the small sample size used in the study below) I have more confidence to ask....Has anyone else seen ligament problems associated with PPID? 


Thanks!

____________________

Suspensory ligament degeneration is associated with Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID)  


 

Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria and the Royal School of Veterinary Studies in Edinburgh, UK, examined histopathological changes in the suspensory ligaments of horses with PPID.

 

Suspensory ligaments from four horses with PPID (ages 17-26 years of age) were compared to seven healthy horses, ranging in age from 4 to 31 years old. 


Result:  Horses with PPID had significantly reduced longitudinal arrangement of collagen fibers, as well as significant proteoglycan accumulations between suspensory ligament fibers.  These symptoms are similar to changes seen after long term high dose corticosteroid treatments. 


 

Implications for your horses: 

 

Owners of horses with PPID are well aware that the disease can reduce the horse’s immune function, as well as increase the risk of laminitis. But they may not realize that their horse can suffer suspensory ligament degeneration as a result of the long term exposure to high blood cortisol levels characteristic of the disease. In humans, there is an association between an Achilles tendon rupture and corticosteroid treatment. The same type of problem appears to be the case with horses suffering from PPID.  

 

Consequently, measures should be taken to reduce cortisol production and slow the progression of PPID[i]. Medication may be used, but good results may also be accomplished by reducing inflammation. Feeding according to the horse’s need to graze on forage continuously, combined with dietary improvements and elevated antioxidants, will make a difference in reducing oxidative stress. This slows inflammatory damage to the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain responsible for starting the cascade of events that lead to excess cortisol production.

  

One limitation to the study is the small sample size. However, the evidence found leads the researchers to suggest that horses affected by degeneration of the suspensory ligament should be screened for PPID.

 

 



Study: Hofberger, S., Gauff, F., and Licka T., 2015. Suspensory ligament degeneration associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses. The Veterinary Journal, 203, 348-350.

 




Re: Are these supplements okay for IR hore?

Nancy C
 

Hi Karin

You can still feed Inky his supps once a day if he's eating it well.  The BO will probably appreciate that.

The best way to tell how much jherb you need to use in the food is by monitoring his gums. Digital pics will help you. So start with his normal amount,and go up till you see pinker gums.

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup
Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
ECIR Group Inc.

 





---In EquineCushings@..., <ksherbin@...> wrote :

Should I double the J-herb dose in this scenario?

 

One last question: At the new farm, Inky will be fed twice a day (currently once a day). Do I halve the supplements for two servings daily, or do I put some supplements in full amount in morning, and others full amount in the evening?

 

You guys rock! 

Karin & Inky

Forest, VA

IR/Cushing's

July 27, 2015

ECHistory8

 

 



Re: Horse WILL NOT eat his minerals

Nancy C
 

Hi Val

Iron overloaded horses need a tightly balanced diet to combat the iron burden.  Personally I'd keep trying Dr Kellon's recommendations but you are probably doing way better than you were before you got here with either approach. Keep at it while you go through the course.

If you are R/S/R-ing the BP pellets really well, it may be slightly less iron than the TCLite so that should be okay.  You can find out exactly how much iron your are adding by sending a sample to E-A.

The suggestions about salt I totally agree with.  Also know that some horses won't eat flax. They love to train us as well and I have found sometimes, that tough love is the route to take.

Please don't forget to sign your posts.

Thanks.

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup
Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
ECIR Group Inc.

 








---In EquineCushings@..., <horseladyinms@...> wrote :

Can any of the moderators help me by telling me what I should feed Jorah, now?  I haven't heard back from Dr. Kellon and I really don't know what to do.  Thank you and HAPPY EASTER 


Re: Horse WILL NOT eat his minerals

 

Can any of the moderators help me by telling me what I should feed Jorah, now?  I haven't heard back from Dr. Kellon and I really don't know what to do.  Thank you and HAPPY EASTER 


Re: Are these supplements okay for IR hore?

ksherbin@...
 

Thank you Nancy!

 

I will look into Ration Plus for prebiotics. The ABC site has nothing but what I provided in the original email on its probiotic Pro Bi. So, either they are very much into protecting proprietary information, or they are selling snake oil!

 

Ditto TCM. The therapist said only veterinarians can order from TCM. I have no access to any information about the herbs they supposedly sell. I will skip asking a vet to order herbs from there and stick with your suggestions.

 

Inky was on Ulcergard for 6 days and was still ouchy afterwards.  A vet had me do the heavy dosing of Panacur ... no effect on ouchiness .... and sold me milk thistle in case it was liver issues ... no efffect. His blood tests from winter time shows no liver or other organ issues. That is where the suggestion for trying probiotics came in.

 

Inky is moving to a new farm next weekend. One reason is that the current barn owner isn't diligent about administering supplements. For instance, he is supposed to be given two scoops of his nutritional supplement (balanced to his hay) and the BO eventually told me she is giving him one heaping scoopful because she doesn't have time to do two scoops. After hearing that, I bagged daily portions of two scoops of the nutritional supplement.

 

We are just now beginning to see some results from the nutritional supplements. His coat is looking a little better.

 

I had bought J-herb but didn't bother to add it to his mix because of the problems at the current farm. Will add that in when he moves. The barn owner at the new place won't feed the J-herb 20 minutes before Inky gets his meal (or in between meals), but I read on this site that people have had success increasing the dose and putting the J-herb in with the meal. I will try that.

 

Should I double the J-herb dose in this scenario?

 

One last question: At the new farm, Inky will be fed twice a day (currently once a day). Do I halve the supplements for two servings daily, or do I put some supplements in full amount in morning, and others full amount in the evening?

 

You guys rock! 

Karin & Inky

Forest, VA

IR/Cushing's

July 27, 2015

ECHistory8

 

 



Re: Maree & Huey

ppnauds@...
 

Thanks Jaini,

 

I know for a fact that the blood was handled correctly.  Vet took blood & owner then took blood (chilled) to processing lab within one hour. Processing lab then spun etc & sent to main lab within four hours.   I believe Dr Kellon is making some enquiries regarding the stability of the Ranvet liquid pergolide in Australia- so I will defer that to her, but agree there are better options. I will advise Maree to continue on the IR as well path for now and wait for the Leptin results. Thanks for your input.

 

Pauline

Sth West Vic

Australia Aug 07

EC Primary Response/Moderator

http://tinyurl.com/7qbdyas

 


And.... I do hate to say it, but when one sees a "nice" insulin and "nice" glucose (both of which are subject to lower values when not spun soon enough, and when exposed to heat), I just have to make sure the blood handling was okay. If the blood handling is at all suspect, then the true ACTH will be higher as well, and an increase in pergolide is definitely indicated.



Re: Serrano sparkled! - New blood results

Claudia Goodman
 

Nancy,
Would very much appreciate your help on this... I am trying to ascertain whether transfer factor is potentially harmful for an IR horse, or is your response in the conversation below implying that TF is likely not helpful and, therefore, not worth the money.  

Thanks for any clarification, 

Claudia & Silhouette 2014 California

ECHistory8

  

176410Re: Fwd: Serrano sparkled! - New blood results

---In EquineCushings@..., <threecatfarm@...> wrote :

If this were Beau, I'd be concerned that he is not controlled on that dose and would have that conversation with my vet. It appears from the blood work that PPID is likely driving his IR.

Transfer Factor is also not helping his IR.

ECIR Moderator 2003

NewEnglandEquineBalance@...

 


Re: Maree & Huey

janieclougher@...
 

Hi, Pauline - Nice insulin.  The ACTH would be okay for a young horse in the autumn, but as you know, for an already-diagnosed PPID horse, mid-levels are better. Correct on your judgement about autumn and liquid pergolide, but for any newbies reading here, capsules are more stable, and one should increase the pergolide until the horse is at a middle to low-middle normal reading of ACTH all year. 

And.... I do hate to say it, but when one sees a "nice" insulin and "nice" glucose (both of which are subject to lower values when not spun soon enough, and when exposed to heat), I just have to make sure the blood handling was okay. If the blood handling is at all suspect, then the true ACTH will be higher as well, and an increase in pergolide is definitely indicated.

Dr. Kellon will have to respond as to the nitty-gritty of the MIRG calculations, because I really don't know. Without the leptin it is hard to be sure if there is IR at baseline (despite the breed).  However, as always, it is wise to treat as IR unless proven otherwise. In other words, if Huey were mine, I would assume IR, and hope he is not, no matter what the MIRG says.

Cheers!





-

.....The query is to do with his IR status.  ACTH 49 pg/mL, Glucose 4.8mmol/L (3.3-6.7)  and Insulin  10 mu/L (<42) . Leptin & T4 pending.  Given his breed- it's unlikely- though not impossible to be IR.  His ACTH is a little high - but not too bad considering our time of year & liquid pergolide (Ranvet) has been increased accordingly. Using the IR calculator- the results come back as MIRG indicates IR. MIRG 5.67- so marginally over the cut off number of 5.6.  I understand that the MIRG is a pancreatic response proxy, but not sure how it comes into play in this case. I have been researching the files & notes from Dr K courses, however still don't fully understand the implications of MIRG

 

Would appreciate any further insight.

 

Pauline

Sth West Vic

Australia Aug 07

EC Primary Response/Moderator

http://tinyurl.com/7qbdyas



Re: diet

janieclougher@...
 

Hi, Kathy - what is often most important in feeds is the percentage of starch. Please don't start feeding the new feed yet, unless you can confirm that it is less than 4% starch.  The 14% protein might or might not cause a problem. If you can give us the name of the feed, and the feed company, we should be able to tell you if it is safe. 

 Donkeys are, unfortunately, much less studied than horses. However, as a baseline philosophy, they have evolved to do well on minimal inputs of sugar, starch, and protein.  Less is better, with these guys.  Like any equine, they need minerals, vitamins and sufficient calories, but too many calories and too many carbs and proteins won't be good for them. 

How is his appetite now on the 1/2 tab of Prascend?  Is he doing better?

Safe and suitable mineral/vitamin supplements in the absence of a hay analysis are: Uckele U-Balance; and California Trace Plus.  Ideally, of course, you will get your hay  and hay cubes analyzed, so that you know what specifically is missing.  In the meantime, do make sure that he is getting Vitamin E, in capsules with soy oil, at a rate of 500 IU per 500 lbs of body weight (best is to use 2 time 400 IU capsules per 500 lbs body weight, since it is a pain to "split" capsules, and since the extra certainly won't hurt); plus salt at 1/2 tbspn per 500 lbs; plus ground, stabilized flax at 2 ounces or 1/3 cup per 500 lbs.

Safe bagged feeds include LMF Low NSC, Nuzu Stabul 1,Ontario Dehy Timothy Balance cubes;  soy hull pellets, ... and, I think that's about it (forgive me if I am missing one or two)




---In EquineCushings@..., <kd7191@...> wrote :

Hi everyone
Kathy and Radar the donkey in Northern WI we found a senior feed with only 6% sugar but has 14%  protein.  can anyone tell me if high protein will cause additional problems for radar?  he remains on a 1/2 tab of prescend  he also is getting timothy hay cubes soaked.  he will not eat the beet pulp but does eat some of the hay flakes that are put out.  have not started feeding yet just checking first.

2016kathy and radar northern WI



Maree & Huey

ppnauds@...
 

I am posting this on behalf of a new Australian member Maree & Huey a 23 yrd old Warmblood x T'bred. Maree has been reading through the files plus ECIR org, however due to a combination of poor internet signal & some Yahoo neo confusion, I have offered to ask this question for the both of us.  We are working on a case history & I will only be replying to myself with the DDTE as I have gone through this with her already. 

 

Brief synopsis until we finalise Case History - Huey- diagnosed PPID two- three years ago (no bloods- vet visual assessment) Started on Pergolide Liquid (Ranvet) &​diet not addressed at that stage, however Maree had been soaking hay. Transitioned from shoes to barefoot & nowhas an excellent barefoot trimmer attending his feet. I met Huey 1 month ago- bloods have ​since ​been taken- hay has been tested & a balanced diet is being worked on. 

 

The query is to do with his IR status.  ACTH 49 pg/mL, Glucose 4.8mmol/L (3.3-6.7)  and Insulin  10 mu/L (<42) . Leptin & T4 pending.  Given his breed- it's unlikely- though not impossible to be IR.  His ACTH is a little high - but not too bad considering our time of year & liquid pergolide (Ranvet) has been increased accordingly. Using the IR calculator- the results come back as MIRG indicates IR. MIRG 5.67- so marginally over the cut off number of 5.6.  I understand that the MIRG is a pancreatic response proxy, but not sure how it comes into play in this case. I have been researching the files & notes from Dr K courses, however still don't fully understand the implications of MIRG

 

Would appreciate any further insight.

 

Pauline

Sth West Vic

Australia Aug 07

EC Primary Response/Moderator

http://tinyurl.com/7qbdyas



Re: Meet Squirt

ppnauds@...
 

 

Hi Claudette

I see that Lavinia has touched base regarding Squirt- great name by the way. I’ll go into a bit more detail.

 

 The philosophy of this group called DDT/E, which stands for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise,

 

DIAGNOSIS: Is done with blood work. We recommend having blood drawn to test for Insulin, Glucose, Leptin and ACTH. ACTH is used to diagnose PPID (Cushings) while insulin, glucose and leptin are used to diagnose Insulin Resistance (IR). The samples should be drawn at home and NON-fasting as fasting will produce artificially low results and are a holdover from human testing protocols. A pony can be only IR, only PPID, neither or both. PPID is managed using medication & attention placed on the diet while IR is managed through diet & exercise.  As you have already had bloodwork done, please post us those results in your CH along with the lab values.

In Australia , we are in what is known as our “Seasonal High” – where the natural ACTH in the horse is elevated. This could potentially become a problem to horses that are undiagnosed PPID. For more information on this & pretty much everything else to do with PPID & IR, please have a read through this amazing source of information www.ecirhorse.org

 

Diet:  The diet that we recommend is a forage based low sugar starch , preferably  grass hay/ native grass/meadow hay tested to be under 10% sugar+starch, with minerals added to balance the hay to the analysis and to replace what is lost during the hay curing process. We also add Vitamin E and ground flax seed.  This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but it also supports the delicate immune system of the PPID horse.  Until you can have your hay tested, we recommend using the emergency diet you were sent when you joined. This is a safe, temporary way to feed that won't do any harm and will definitely help an IR/PPID equine. As important as what to feed is what NOT to feed. No grain, pasture, red/brown salt blocks, apples, carrots, sugary treats, lucerne. Soaking untested hay for 30 minutes in hot water or 60 min in cold water then dumping the water where the pony can't get it will help remove up to 30% of the sugars and make it safer to feed.  Having said that Rhodes hay tends to be consistently low in ESC & Starch already, but would still recommend testing. You should plan to feed 2% of ideal bodyweight in soaked hay per day, divided into 3-4 feedings. Small mesh hay nets are a great way to make the hay rations last longer. With the beet pulp you should rinse/soak/rinse it before feeding it- to reduce any excess iron which can be a bit high in beet pulp .Maxisoy is also another safe feed that you can use & either of these feeds can be used as a carrier for the emergency diet (ED) items of salt, vit E gelcaps with oil in them, ground flax and magnesium. All of these ED items are available at your local pharmacy/grocery store or stock feed place.

http://www.kohnkesown.com/trimqa.pdf   is the link for Kohnke trim mix. It’s an expensive form of magnesium, and while it's okay to have it, most horses don't need the chromium as it is abundant in most hays unless grown on alkaline soil.  It also contains Vitamin C – which is not recommended as it can enhance iron absorbtion.  You may want to try something like “Best Guess” http://www.balancedequine.com.au/nutrition/index.html  or “Missys’ Bucket http://www.myhealthyhorse.com.au/missys-bucket/   instead as a mineral supplement until you can get the diet properly squared away.


TRIM: Toes backed and heels low so that the hoof capsule tightly hugs and supports the internal structures. This is one of the most common "missing links" when soundness is an issue. We encourage you to post pictures of your pony in the PHOTOS section of ECHistory8 so that we can help make sure the trim is optimal. Here's a website that shows how to take good hoof pictures:  http://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/good-hoof-photos.html If there are any lameness issues, we recommend boots and pads for comfort. Great that you are getting radiographs taken, , you can also post them in your case history once you have a copy. A good trimmer/farrier should be able to work with these xrays to enable a balanced trim.

EXERCISE: Best IR buster there is, but never force a sore equine to move. Need to be especially careful if there  are any NSAID's (bute etc)  being used as this will mask pain and encourage the equine to do too much too soon on compromised feet.

 

In answer to your question regarding a paddock paradise – I managed three PPID/IR horses this way. You just have to vigilant about the grass as you are aware.   I tried to be as environmentally conscious as I could with keeping the greenies at bay- but in the end what worked for me was using roundup.

I had feeding stations approx 100meters apart (with small hole hay nets) to encourage movement. Having this sort of system made our lives so much easier & the horses were much better off for it.

 

Well done for being pro active with Squirt, please have a good read of the information that is available in the files & ask if you have any more questions.  We are here to help you both and even though we are at opposite ends of the map- at least we're in the same country! I have a trimmer friend that lives two hours away from you who is willing to help source local things if needed.

 

 

Pauline

Sth West Vic

Australia Aug 07

EC Primary Response/Moderator

http://tinyurl.com/7qbdyas

 

 

'Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.' ~ St. Francis of Assisi






.




Re: diet

Lorna Cane
 

Hi Kathy,

Can you link us to Radar's CH (in your signature) so that we can see the whole picture?
Also a link to the feed would be helpful.


Lorna in Ontario,Canada

ECIR Moderator 2002


*See What Works in Equine Nutrition*
http://www.ecirhorse.com/images/stories/Success_Story_3_-Ollies_Story__updated.pdf



>>>.......... we found a senior feed with only 6% sugar but has 14%  protein.  can anyone tell me if high protein will cause additional problems for radar?  


diet

Kathy Billek
 

Hi everyone
Kathy and Radar the donkey in Northern WI we found a senior feed with only 6% sugar but has 14%  protein.  can anyone tell me if high protein will cause additional problems for radar?  he remains on a 1/2 tab of prescend  he also is getting timothy hay cubes soaked.  he will not eat the beet pulp but does eat some of the hay flakes that are put out.  have not started feeding yet just checking first.

2016kathy and radar northern WI



Re: Meet Squirt

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Claudette (?),

Welcome to the list. Sounds like Squirt has found a really good home with you. In order to help you better we need you to fill out a case history for Squirt on our sister list ECHistory8. You'll need to join but that only takes a moment:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/info

I couldn't find a list of the actual ingredients in the Kohnkes Trim supplement - could you please post that for us? Some bells warning go off when reading the site for the product as there is nothing available that will miraculously "cure" IR. The soaked hay will in and of itself produce the results that are claimed to be achieved by the supplement so it's a "buyer beware" scenario.

Minis are notorious for being IR, which isn't a disease but a metabolic type. They are geared to be super-efficient in utilizing feed so with out modern practices of too much food and not enough exercise, they quickly become overweight and many times laminitic.  Dietary control is the key to managing them for the remainder of their lives. Add in the PPID, a disease that requires medication to control it, and which will drive IR and you have the perfect recipe for laminitis/founder.

We ask that you sign all posts with your name, general location and year of joining so we can help you more fully. Once you have Squirt's case history complete, we ask that you include a link to that as well.

I'm on the run so will have more for you a bit later. One of our mods is an Aussie, with a wealth of info specific to your area, so I know she'll chime in as soon as she's able.

Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut
Jan 05, RI
EC Support Team




Re: up date on princess..

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 


Hi Sue,

Thank-you for the update. Know that our thoughts are with you and Princess.

Hugs to you both,
Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut
Jan 05, RI
EC Support Team



Meet Squirt

Claudette Simenson
 

Hi all,


My problem childs name is Squirt and he is a 16 year old Mini. We live in the Swan Valley on the West Coast of Australia. I bought him last November as a companion for my TB gelding. Previous to this he was a kids party pony as he just has the most beautiful temperament. Squirt is my first foray into mini horses and he has been a real learning curve. We tested him for Cushings and Insulin Resistance last week Friday and his results came back terrible for both - just to be followed by our first case of acute laminitis. When we purchased him last year we were told he hadn't foundered in the last few years but our vet said otherwise. He has been regularly getting trimmed monthly and we will now be xraying next week to see what changes have taken place and what we are working with. He will be starting his peroglide next week when it arrives. For now he is locked in his pen, with rhodes hay and three small hard feeds of speedibeet a day to get his vit+min, salts, magnesium and Kohnkes Trim into him. I've been told he will have to be locked up for 7-10 days initially and then he can live in the sand paddock with his little best mate who a friend kindly lends us. 


I'm after any advise on what to do to manage him, to keep him comfortable and pain free (and happy!). Whats the biggest size pen you would give a horse with acute laminitis?


Also does anyone manage their Cushings/IR horses on a track system like in Paddock Paradise? Im worried with the rain starting the grass will regrow in the paddock which I cant really have with two IR ponies.




Re: Jennifer and Darcy, back again

bectonliterary
 

Thank you, Jaini! I was wondering when I would need to retest for the seasonal rise, so I'm glad you told me. 

Jennifer and Darcy in SC
October 2011

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