Date   

Re: Triple Crown Lite vs Nutrena Safe Choice (for metabolic horses)

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

The Guaranteed Analysis for Safe Choice Special Care is 11% starch + 4% sugar.
--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Nappi, George, Peanut over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Re: Triple Crown Lite vs Nutrena Safe Choice (for metabolic horses)

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Shannon,

Really need a completed case history for Majik to answer you the best but first question is why do you need a "bagged feed" at all?

Recommendation is to have ESC+starch 10% or less, with starch fraction of less than 3-4%.

We have one analysis for Safe Choice in the files: starch 16.4% + ESC 6.4%. That would be enough to blow the feet off many IR horses...
--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Nappi, George, Peanut over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Re: New hoof photos for Rated G

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Patty,

The photos don't make it look worse, they just show what is actually there, from many angles - they are neutral. When you are with the actual horse, you are influenced by everything that is going on and you are making various assumptions that you aren't even necessarily aware that you are making. Happens to everyone. We specify taking pix from specific angles so as to minimize the "subjective" factor and to provide a consistent framework for assessing the situation over time.

Flared wall cannot provide support because its connections to the underlying structures are already compromised. Asking it to play a support role only perpetuates the damage. Most horses will have "good hoof growing in" if you look at the area under the coronary ban. The question is, does it maintain that integrity all the way down to the ground? If not, is there a noticeable angle change and has that "spot" gradually moved lower on the hoof or does it appear to be remaining in relatively the same place over time? If it is remaining in the same place then there are factors at work that aren't optimal and unresolved trim problems are usually a key part.
--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Nappi, George, Peanut over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Re: ECIR Group - Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance - Timeline Photos #FACTS

Shannon
 

How do horses in the wild (mustangs for example) meet their copper and zinc needs?
--
God Bless!

Shannon and Majik (IR)
Houston 2009

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Shannon%20and%20Majik%20and%20Rafiq

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1873


Sugar and Starch levels

Vikki Fear
 

One of the major feed companies in the UK has just reformulated their pelleted balancer products, and whilst they still aren't as good as the forage balancer type products, they are getting closer to the mark.

I emailed them about the products, to see if they could make a formulation suitable for IR/Cushings horses that was less than 10% sugar and starch (they currently come in at 14%). I have included the entire conversation below, but the gist is, they say, their testing shows that it is total amount of sugar and starch in a feed that causes the insulin response, not percentage and have asked for scientific evidence to show that it is percentage. I will of course ask them for their peer reviewed paper showing that it is total amount.

Does the group have anything that I could forward to the company? It would be amazing to get these people on board because their feeds are available in every feed store in the country.


Good Morning Vikki,
 
In our experience and through our own research, it's the total starch and sugar in the meal that seems to drive the glucose and insulin response. Although we haven't directly measured the glucose and insulin response to a 500 gram meal of our balancer I would be surprised if it produced a significant response. Although if you have any scientific evidence the percentage of NSC is the driving factor we would be very open to discuss this with our Director of Science.
 
Thank you for your feedback we always like to stay open to challenge and new ideas.
 
Best Wishes, Gina
 

From: Vikki Fear [mailto:freshhooves@...] 
Sent: 01 November 2016 16:35
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <helpline.horsecareUK@...>
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Sent: 01 November 2016 16:35
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <helpline.horsecareUK@...>
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Sent: 01 November 2016 16:35
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <helpline.horsecareUK@...>
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Sent: 01 November 2016 16:35
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <helpline.horsecareUK@...>
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
 
Hi Gina, 
Thanks for your reply. With regards the sugar and starch levels, when managing Insulin Resistant horses, the latest thinking is to keep the sugar and starch level of each meal below 10% combined rather than balancing the whole day, this is because each meal produces an insulin spike. Because the balancers are designed to be a compound feed replacement, it would be unlikely and difficult to reduce the sugar and starch in the meal by mixing with other feed items. 
Vikki Fear DEP MEPA(UK)
Vikki@...
07986711310
---- Horsecare UK Helpline wrote ----
Hello Vikki,
 
Thank you for your reply. I agree that balancers should be designed to complement forage as it should be the foundation of every horse’s diet. The level of vitamin A and D we include are amongst the lowest in the market as you are correct they are often over supplied in the diet but we do need to include them as some horses don’t have access to fresh pasture and even a lack of sunlight can interfere with vitamin D production particularly in stabled horses. The level of sugar and starch are the lowest we can practically achieve and if fed at 500 grams will only supply 25 grams of sugar and 45 grams of starch which is equivalent to 350 grams (DM) of 20% NSC hay so has very little contribution in the total diet.
 
I hope this explanation helps you feel more confident in recommending our products to your clients.
 
 Best Wishes, Gina
 
From: Vikki Fear [mailto:freshhooves@...] 
Sent: 01 November 2016 12:19
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <
Sent: 01 November 2016 12:19
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <
Sent: 01 November 2016 12:19
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <
Sent: 01 November 2016 12:19
To: Horsecare UK Helpline <helpline.horsecareUK@...>
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
Subject: RE: General Enquiry
 
Thank-you. 
It would be great if you were as a company able to formulate a balancer with less than 10% sugar and starch and lower levels of vitamin a and d for horses that are on a mainly forage diet.
Vikki Fear DEP MEPA(UK)
Vikki@...
07986711310
---- Horsecare UK Helpline wrote ----
Hello Vikki,
 
Thank you for your enquiry, please see attached our balancer guide and our full nutritional breakdown for your reference. 
 
I hope this helps but if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to get back in touch. 
 
Best Wishes, Gina (Care-Line Nutritionist)
 
 

Product

Energy MJ/Kg

Oil %

Protein %

Fibre %

Ash%

Sugar%

Starch%

Lysine %

Methionine %

Ca %

P %     

Mg %

K %

Na %

Fe mg/kg

Mn mg/kg

I mg/kg

Co mg/kg

Cu mg/kg

Zn mg/kg

Se mg/kg

Daily Balancer

10.50

5.00

15.00

8.00

14.00

5.00

9.00

1.40

0.50

3.00

1.20

0.60

1.30

0.40

none added

160.00

2.00

0.10

160.00

600.00

2.00

Original Multi Balancer

10.50

6.00

25.00

8.00

11.00

5.00

9.00

1.70

0.50

3.00

1.20

0.60

1.40

0.40

none added

200.00

2.00

0.10

200.00

600.00

2.00

Lite + Lean Balancer

9.50

4.80

18.00

13.00

11.00

5.00

9.00

3.00

0.60

2.00

0.80

0.60

1.30

0.50

none added

160.00

2.00

0.10

160.00

600.00

2.00

Pro Performance Balancer

10.70

6.00

25.00

8.00

15.00

5.00

10.00

1.60

0.40

3.00

1.20

0.60

1.40

0.40

none added

100.00

2.00

0.10

100.00

300.00

1.50

Supple + Senior Balancer

10.20

6.00

25.00

8.00

16.00

5.00

9.00

1.60

0.40

3.00

1.40

0.60

1.40

0.40

none added

160.00

2.00

0.10

160.00

600.00

2.00

SPILLERS Gro'N Win

12.00

5.00

32.00

5.00

15.00

6.50

7.00

2.20

0.50

3.00

1.50

0.60

1.60

0.40

150.00

200.00

2.00

0.10

175.00

450.00

1.50

 
 

Product

Vitamin A  iu/kg

Vitamin D iu/kg

Vitamin E iu/kg

Vitamin C mg/kg

Daily Balancer

40,000

4,000

1,800

 

Original Multi Balancer

40,000

4,000

2500

2000

Lite + Lean Balancer

40,000

4,000

2000

 

Pro Performance Balancer

 

 

2500

2000

Supple + Senior Balancer

40,000

4,000

2000

2000

Gro N' Win Stud Balancer

44,000

4,400

1500

126

 

Feed

B1 mg/kg

B2 mg/kg

B6 mg/kg

Niacin mg/kg

Panthothenate mg/kg

Folic acid mg/kg

Choline mg/kg

Biotin mcg/kg

B12 mcg/kg

Daily Balancer

50

50

20

70

100

20

1,200

30,000

400

Original Multi Balancer

100

100

60

100

100

60

1,200

30,000

650

Lite + Lean Balancer

50

50

20

70

100

20

1,200

30,000

400

Pro Performance Balancer

100

100

60

100

100

60

1,200

30,000

650

Supple + Senior

50

50

20

70

100

20

1,200

30,000

400

 

--
Vikki
Worcestershire (UK)  2016-06
Echo, Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Vikki%20and%20Echo
          Photo album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1244


Re: New hoof photos for Rated G

Patty
 

I see a difference even with how the angle is when phone is on ground too - just by holding phone differently. I tried something different today, but it didn't work. I can see just looking at him today some "flare," but farrier can't take any more off. He was only able to put 2 nails on each side. However, I think photos make it look worse than they are. 

My farrier also mentioned taking off so much wall can cause other problems because lack of support.  He has good hoof growing in, so I can't say my vet and farrier have been wrong all these months.  


- Patty 
Sept 2016
Kernersville NC



ECIR Group - Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance - Timeline Photos #FACTS

ECIR Integration <main@...>
 

Timeline Photos

By ECIR Group - Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance

It is extremely rare to find forage that meets the minimum recommended daily allowance (RDA) for zinc and copper. In fact, the chances of finding hay with enough copper to meet the National Research Council’s RDA is 5%, and for zinc, only 2%. Simply put, most forages are deficient for these two important trace minerals, providing only half of the daily requirement for zinc and slightly more for copper. These data (170 samples) were collected from the same geographic region by the same experienced person, over the course of 5 years. Data from online databases often contain extreme outliers and contaminants, making the results less reliable.

The graph clearly shows a “frank” mineral deficiency, meaning that the lowest possible RDA is not met. Many nutritionists and feed companies aim for two times the minimum RDA. Therefore, a product that provides at least 100 milligrams of copper and 300 milligrams of zinc would be a reasonable place to start. It is always better to know the nutrient and mineral profile of your forage through an analysis. If you can’t analyze your forage, you can safely assume that zinc and copper are likely deficient and can then take the necessary steps to correct it.


Triple Crown Lite vs Nutrena Safe Choice (for metabolic horses)

Shannon
 

I have been feeding Majik small amounts of Nutrena's Safe Choice for special needs horses as this is included in the feed choices available at my boarding barn.  TC Lite is much lower in starch/sugar, but will cost me quite a bit more per month as it will be in addition to the board.  Is it worth the switch?  I ask b/c I recall that TC Lite had some odd numbers come back from folks sending it in for analysis, and because I'm broke.  It will also be quite a bit more work keeping up with it.  Opinions?
--
God Bless!

Shannon and Majik (IR)
Houston 2009

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Shannon%20and%20Majik%20and%20Rafiq

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1873


New hoof pictures up for Majik

Shannon
 

New pix of Majik's feet - before and after trim and shoeing.  I did the best I could during thunderstorms!  Shoes are aluminum with a lifted heel and slight rocker toe, and an open back to allow her heels to grow down.  I have been using Durasol a bit too much - her feet and frogs were hard as rocks!  There wasn't much toe that could be taken off as you will see.  The shoes should help with breakover.  She came in sound and walked out sound.  Mark-ups are appreciated.  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1873
--
Thank you and God Bless!

Shannon and Majik (IR)
Houston 2009

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Shannon%20and%20Majik%20and%20Rafiq

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1873


Re: Tis the Season Course Special Sale

DawnC
 

Thank you Dr. Kellon!

Dawn & Roma

Delaware

August 2011


Re: New hoof photos for Rated G

Lorna Cane
 

Now that's a picture.

And I can identify well!


I just asked because the view from the floor, and from standing up, or even leaning down are all different. I've been taught to go with the view from close to floor level.



--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002


https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/PPID%20and%20IR%20Success%20Stories/Success%20Story%20%233%20-%20Lorna%20and%20Ollies%20Story.pdf



ECIR Group Policy, Wednesday, 2 November 2016 #cal-notice

ECIR Calendar <noreply@...>
 

ECIR Group Policy

When:
Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Description:

Accuracy of Information

We take the importance of accurate information very seriously. The information in our posts and case histories is of tremendous value to all our members and is also used for formal studies. It is extremely important that it be factual. To protect the integrity and veracity of the group's data, a member may be asked at times to produce documentation, such as a copy of a report. These requests will be rare. Most of you will never receive one. 

*

Solicitation is against list policy. 

Whether directly selling a product or service or not, if you are contacted privately by someone, be suspicious. These communications frequently target new members or those in a crisis.  They almost universally push a position, product or service that the sender knows will not be upheld on the list or by close examination.

We welcome questions, suggestions and individual experiences from every member on list, but the bottom line is the welfare of the horse.  ECIR approval is always based on provable facts and scientific methods, not opinions and belief.


Anyone who tries to bypass being challenged to support their position with properly assembled facts by sending unsolicited private e-mails rather than posting on the list is, in our opinion, risking the welfare of horses and will be banned.


If you receive an unsolicited e-mail either ask the group about it, or forward the mail to main+owner@ECIR.groups.io 

 

Thank you for your cooperation.

 

Owners, Moderators & Primary Response Team of the Equine Cushings List

 


Re: New hoof photos for Rated G

Patty
 

I was pretty much crawling around on the floor at my vet's, but I can check more closely tomorrow. My vet was watching me and the angle of phone. 

- Patty 

Sept 2016
Kernersville NC


Re: New hoof photos for Rated G

Lorna Cane
 

On Tue, Nov 1, 2016 at 05:33 pm, Patty wrote:
Both my vet and farrier agree that he does not have flares like the photos show.

 Just wondering,Patty........do you/they get down and look from the same angle the camera does when it's on the ground, or at least pretty close?


--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002


https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/PPID%20and%20IR%20Success%20Stories/Success%20Story%20%233%20-%20Lorna%20and%20Ollies%20Story.pdf



New hoof photos for Rated G

Patty
 

I've posted a BUNCH of new photos for Rated G.  He was trimmed and reset today.  I'm very confused.  When I look at his feet, they look good.  When I take photos, they look like they have flares.  Both my vet and farrier agree that he does not have flares like the photos show.  I've posted multiple photos of each foot to show the differences I see.  Different angles look different. I've also posted views that are not asked for since I think they look different at different angles.  I can delete some if I need to. 

I'm going to keep him in shoes since I think it's best for him.  All pads are off now. 

Still haven't gotten mark ups from last photos, but I think photos make his feet look worse than they were. No need for mark ups now.  And I still have unanswered questions about sinking and under run heels. 


Thank you!


- Patty 
Sept 2016
Kernersville NC


Re: Need some advice

Maggie
 
Edited

Hi Ruby,

Welcome to the group!  Congratulations on your new adoption!  You've come to the right place for the best, most up to date information about equine metabolic issues, but to best answer your questions, we really need to get some more details about your new boy.  To get those details, we ask all members to fill out a case history (CH) on their horse.  You will need to join the CH subgroup here:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory and then all that you need to know about how to make a CH folder and fill out the CH form can be found in the wiki here:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/wiki  

Meanwhile, I will give you some details about our philosophy called DDT/E, short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise, and address your concerns as best as I can.  Once you get your CH filled out, we'll be able to be much more specific with answers to your questions wrt your horse.

Diagnosis:  To get a full diagnosis of PPID (Cushing's) and or IR (insulin resistance) we recommend these 4 tests:  ACTH, insulin, glucose and leptin, preferably sent to Cornell.  The ACTH is diagnose PPID, the glucose and insulin to diagnose IR and the leptin helps to differentiate if the horse is IR at baseline or if a high ACTH is driving the insulin up.  Horses over the age of 10 are at risk for PPID.  So you have an elevated insulin.  The glucose that came in below the normal reference range may indicate improper handling of the blood, which could also affect the insulin.  Do you know if an ACTH was also drawn?  It would be most helpful if you could upload copies of the labwork into your CH folder.  There is some information there that can sometimes help us to help you interpret it better.

More information on our website here:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-diagnosis 

Any horse can have just PPID, just IR, both or neither.  The reason getting a full diagnosis is so important is so that you know how to move forward with treatment.  PPID is treated with medicine (pergolide/Prascend) and a mineral balanced diet.  IR is treated with a low sugar/starch (less than 10% combined) mineral balanced diet and exercise.  A horse that has both PPID and IR would need both pergolide and a carefully managed low sugar/starch mineral balanced diet for the rest of it's life.

Diet:  The diet that we use is a low carb, (less than 10% sugar+starch) low fat (4% or less), mineral balanced diet.  We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% sugar + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E.  This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse.  

Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you use the emergency diet.  Details about the emergency diet can be found in the "start here" file:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/1%20Start%20Here  Also there is lots of other helpful information in the start here file so recommend that you read the entire file.

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important, as what you do feed!  No pasture.  No grain.  No sugary treats, including apples and carrots.  No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron and sometimes molasses, and interfere with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only.  No products containing molasses.

You are right to be cautious about using glucosamine.  It can worsen IR.  Look in this "Avoid these items" file for other avoid or use cautiously  items:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/4%20Insulin%20Resistance/1%20Avoid%20These%20Items.pdf 

Safe joint supplements for IR horses include HA, condroitin, Mov-Ease, all available from My Best Horse:  http://mybesthorse.com/   More information about joint supplements here:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/Joint%20Supplements 

Trim: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot.  Though important for all horses, it's essential for an IR and/or PPID horse to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis.  Look on the following pages of our website for more information about a proper trim.


Here:  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-trim  


and here: http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/laminitis/realigning-trim 


After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, the trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic horse comfortable.  Sometimes horses with subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as having arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the horse attempts to compensate for sore feet.  Not saying that's what's going on with your horse, but just something to consider.


You are encouraged to post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have in the PHOTOS section of the case history group so that our hoof guru can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place.   Go here to read about how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed and how to get the best hoof shots:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/wiki 


Exercise: The best IR buster there is, but only if the horse is comfortable and non-laminitic.  A horse that has had lamintis needs 6-9 months after a correct realigning trim is in place before any serious exercise can begin.

So, Ruby, that highlights the main points of our philosophy. Take some time to explore our website (http://ecirhorse.org/ ) the files, the archived messages and also the wiki (https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/wiki ) as there is a TON of information provided.  Don't miss the FAQ's page on the website!  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/faq 
 
Let us know when you have your CH done and don't hesitate to ask any further questions that you have!  We ask all members to please sign each time they post, with their name (first is fine--thanks for that!), date of joining, and general location (helps us to source products for you).  Once you get your CH done, please add a link to it in your signature as well.  That helps us to find it easier and answer your questions faster!   

Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA 
March 2011
EC moderator/Primary Response


Need some advice

rubyann_alfonso@...
 

Hi, I'm new to this page and also pretty new to owning a horse  I recently adopted a retired roping horse that has a few issues. He has some arthritis and the beginning of some  navicular in one of his hooves. I had some blood work done but the Dr.didnt seem to concerned but I just want to ask for help from others that have  experience. I'm wanting to put him on a joint supplement but not sure what. In the blood work his insulin level was 8.92  the normal levels are between 4-8 so I see it was a little elevated and his T4 was 3.1 normal levels 0.9-2.8. But his glucose was 63 normal levels at 64-105. So I'm not sure if putting him on a glucosamine is right.  I really could use some advice. Thank you Ruby


Re: Stormy's uploaded Case History-

hinecedark <hinecedark@...>
 

Hi Amy,

Welcome. Just want to let you know a couple of things specific to your location.

Wallace Grain in Sheridan, IN, carries Ontario Dehy Timothy Balance Cubes (which you will read about a lot here - usually referred to as ODTBC). If you buy ten bags or more at a time, they will deliver to you free. I've been doing this for several years, live near Mooresville, and they have been very reliable. There is a Tractor Supply store in Greenfield that supposedly carries Nuzu Stabul 1. They have not had any on hand when I have called, and have not responded to my requests to call me when they get some. It has been a while since I tried, though. I have had no luck in getting TSC in Plainfield to get the Nuzu - maybe if there are two of us? I'm afraid to commit to a large quantity until trying a couple of bags - my old guy is a "sneak" picky eater - he will love something for a week or two before deciding he doesn't want that anymore . . . .

I've been testing my hay (orchard grass with a bit of big red clover) since 2006, through two drought years, and haven't had a batch too high in sugar or starch yet. I hasten to say that this has all been from the same few fields, same farmer, and the testing is still important for balancing minerals. Just to let you know that it shouldn't be too hard to find appropriate hay in our area. 

Best of luck. Much to learn here, keep reading. Dr. Kellon's two-for-one holiday deal on her courses is also a great investment (NRC+ and Cushings and Insulin Resistance), if it's in the budget after all the testing, etc. 
--
Melinda  2010

IN

Cato Case History 


Re: Arthritis Pain

Suzanne Mansolilli
 

Thank you Jaini and Dr K for your thoughts.

Re protein/amino acid supplement: In my above post I mentioned trying Duralactin, but meant microlactin, the active ingredient in Duralactin, which you had suggested to me before. (I  found Duralactin to have added zinc and manganese which he doesn't need, and you're not kidding it's whopping expensive!) I found Microlactin powder at Swanson. Is this ok to give? I understand it's meant for human consumption and as per the post you forwarded me by Dr Kellon, it should be dosed at 4-5x human dose.  The photo doesn't show a list of ingredients, so I'll call the company to find out if there is any added sugar or flavoring.

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-ultra-microlactin-powder-4-9-oz-140-grams-pwdr

Re ACTH: Already have started increasing dose by another mg.  Will test in 3 wks.  Looking for ACTH to hit mid - high teens and hoping for insulin below 20. Am working on desensitizing to needle by poking with a toothpick with a bit of clicker training. Last Friday's Pentosan injection was 80% less stressful than last!  Thanks for that tip!!

Re Vitamin C: His Fe:Cu ratio is 4:1, but he has never reliably eaten 100% of his supps every day so his diet will never be as tight as it's supposed to be.  Still OK to give the C?

Thanks again,


-- Suzanne July 20

Western CO

Monty Case History, Photo Album


Message Posting Etiquette - Keeping ECIR User Friendly, Tuesday, 1 November 2016 #cal-notice

ECIR Calendar <noreply@...>
 

Invitation:
Message Posting Etiquette - Keeping ECIR User Friendly

When:
Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Description:

This is a high volume list that can be difficult to follow. Help make it easier for everyone by following the Message Posting Guidelines below:
 
1) READ the Start Here Documents.  Unless you are in an emergency situation, before posting in the messages, please read the documents you were sent upon joining.  They are designed to speed you through the set up process so we can help you help your equine in the most efficient way possible. 
2) Check the Wiki for "How To" Pages (and more).  The ECIR has lots of information and finding your way around can be tricky. The Wiki is the place to start. 

3) Sign your posts. This is a very large group.  Whenever posting a message, identify yourself and your equine by using your full ECIR Signature with your first name, location, the date you joined and the link to your Case History folder and Photo Album. The volunteers need all this information to provide quality responses and perhaps suggestions for local support, vendors, vets, hoof care, etc. Go here for directions on how to make and save your ECIR Signature
 
4) Be clear in your posts. If you need to quote a line from a message: BEFORE you hit the Reply button highlight the text you want quoted, then hit Reply.  The highlighted portion will appear as quote in your message. 
 
5)  Try not to hijack threads.  Start a New Message to discuss issues not covered by the subject line.    
 
6) Don't immediately re-post.  Give “missing” posts a few hours before reposting. For unanswered messages, be patient, a lack of response is not personal or a reflection on you in any way. With so many posts some do get missed. Unless in an emergency situation, wait roughly 48 hours before re-posting and edit the subject line with "2nd Post". 
 
7) Off-topic but horse-related discussions: ECHorsekeeping provides a place to discuss issues involving non-PPID/IR horses, general horse keeping practices, other equine health issues, alternative therapies and other equine related philosophical debates.

 
Thank you for your cooperation.
 
- Owners, Moderators & Primary Response Team of the Equine Cushings List

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