Date   

Re: Iron Overload Formula or Calculator

Maggie
 

Hi Stehanie,

There is no calculator for iron overload.  Here's a link to your CH folder in groups.io:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Stephanie%20and%20Fury  Upload your lab work into your Blood work results in your CH folder and let us know when it's done, so Dr Kellon can interpret it.

Make sure you copy and paste the groups.io CH folder into your signature.  The one in your last post is to the old Yahoo site.  Thanks!

Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA 
March 2011
EC moderator/Primary Response


Stable 1 Sale

Sharon Manning
 

Hi,

I live in East TN. I have about 15 bags of Stabul 1. My horse I was feeding this to has passed. So, I am stuck with it and will let it go really cheep. IF anyone is interested in this feed please let me know. Contact me and I will give you my address. THANKs

Sharon M

E TN


Iron Overload Formula or Calculator

 

Hi all,  I have new lab results for my two horses Fury and Apps. I can't find a formula to calculate iron overload. I have all the values of an iron panel plus ferritin. Could someone direct me to a link with a formula or calculator? Thanking you in advance!!!

Stephanie and Fury, Colorado, 2009

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHistory2/files/Stephanie%20Sharpless%20%26%20Fury/



Re: Re-Leve Kentucky Equine Horse Feed

Cheryl
 

Thank you for the input.  I value each and every one. 
Will be having someone from the mineral balancing recommendations  page look at case history and hay test.

--
Cheryl in MN

04-2016

Case history:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cheryl%20and%20Tom/Tom%20Case%20History.pdf

Tom's photo album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1961


Re: Cresty neck caused by stress

Maggie
 

Hi Priscilla,

Welcome to the group.  Good for you for helping this pony.  I would strongly encourage your friend to join this group so s/he can fill out a CH on the pony.  The more information we have, the better the we can help.  You can also share our website with your friend:  http://ecirhorse.org/   There is a ton of great information there!

We follow a philosophy here called DDT/E, short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.  All the details about our philosophy can found on our website, linked above.

A simple blood test can tell if the pony is IR (insulin resistant) or has PPID (Cushing's), and then she can be treated appropriately.  Getting a diagnosis of IR and/or PPID is an essential first step in moving forward.  PPID is treated with medicine (pergolide), and a mineral balanced diet.  IR is treated with a low/sugar starch (under 10%), low fat (under 4%) mineral balanced diet and exercise.  Though not all fat horses/ponies are IR, many are.  http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/insulin-resistance 

The 4 tests that we recommend to diagnose PPID and/or IR are ACTH, insulin, glucose and leptin.  The ACTH is for diagnosing PPID, the insulin, glucose are to diagnose IR.  The leptin helps to determine if the horse is IR at baseline or if an elevated ACTH is driving the insulin up.  Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating"  and many IR horses are also leptin resistant, and cannot self regulate on free choice hay.  Read more about Leptin resistance here:
 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/4%20Insulin%20Resistance  It's the 4th file up from the bottom in that folder.
 
And more information in this post and links by Dr Kellon:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/199596 

I found this post (#204137) by Dr Kellon which say this about pain/cortisol:

"Pain itself can contribute to high insulin levels. There is not a lot of research on this but it appears to be unrelated to stress cortisol release.  There is an interplay between glucose/insulin regulation and the nervous system.  Chronic IR can also lead to damage to nerves and neuropathic pain. This has been documented in laminitis. It's a vicious cycle."


Here's the link to the whole message:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/204137


Additionally, we know through experience that sometimes horses with subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as having arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the horse attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

Again, strongly encourage your friend to join here so we can get the details we need to help this pony.

Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA 
March 2011
EC moderator/Primary Response


Cresty neck caused by stress

Priscilla Cuming
 

Hi everyone


i have a friend who has a small finely built riding pony of 12hh who has a rock hard cresty neck, fat tummy and plump bottom. 

She is a very reactive flighty pony who is nervous when being handled and under saddle. She is owned and handled by a very knowledge family and ridden by two extremely gentle experienced girls. She is lightly ridden and is in a small day paddock with low sugar round bale in a slow feeder net. She does not have access to green grass. Her only source of food is the hay.

She has been seen by a leading chiropractic vet who diagnosed her as being in pain (shoulder related i think). She has some muscle wastage from a previously ill fitting saddle and a very slight slight club foot.

Someone has them told my friend that pain is causing her to be stressed which makes her produce excess cortisol which is causing the crest etc.

I have consulted with my feed guru on this and she does not subscribe to this theory at all. Does anyone know of any scientific research about this? I've done lots of googling and can't find a thing regarding stress/cortisol/crests. 

Looking forward to hearing people's thoughts! 


Re: Crude Protein

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

I'd get the nitrates checked as well if the CP still comes back that high.
--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Re: Crude Protein

Pam Martin <pmart1132@...>
 

Lavinia
No legume that I can see.  Just grass, some soft leafy material (young weeds or leaves maybe) and a little dead grass.  Just a nice soft hay.  Calcium is .42.  EA is rerunning as they thought the CP was high as well.  Will keep you posted.  Thanks for responding.
Pam and CJ
OH 2006


Re: Crude Protein

pmart1132@...
 

Jaini
I called EA today and they are going to rerun the CP, ESC, WSC and starch.  They thought the protein looked high for just a grass hay.  Yes, I am only giving him a flake of it with some other until I get my final results.  If still high, I will look for other hay.  Will let you know the results.  Thanks for responding.
Pam and CJ
OH 2006


Re: Early PPID pergolide dose

Paula Hancock
 

I just wanted to follow up on Onyx's early PPID and updated test results.  I decided to go to the full 1 mg pergolide, because I just wasn't sure if 0.5 mg was enough.  I titrated slowly, four days at each 25% increase and the only side effects I noted were that he was a little quiet and, after the first day at 1 mg, he had loose manure once.  His appetite is no longer ravenous like it was in the fall and he is back to his usual eating patterns of eating well, but stopping to take his morning nap and then going back to eat more.  His energy is good and he instigates the daily muzzle boxing sessions with Cory during turnout, he enjoys dipping his muzzle into the mud hole he dug and painting Cory with it and he is doing well under saddle.  He does seem less reactive to wind, which has been a problem in the fall for at least a couple of years.  I think he has been early PPID for longer than I realized, but he has never tested above the "normal" range except in December for the TRH stim test.  We had major winds today, gusts up to 50 mph and he didn't get rattled and start his mad dashing back and forth along the fence in his paddock. He does seem warmer and less affected by the cold than his previous winters. 

His retest at the end of January on 1 mg Prascend shows his IR status as compensated and his ACTH was 18.4 pg/mL (9 to 35 mg/mL) and post TRH stim was 72.9 pg/mL (9 to 110 mg/mL).  I am not sure exactly how I am going to monitor him.  I would rather not do the TRH stim every time but might just aim to keep the endogenous ACTH around 20 and monitor G/I to make sure his IR is under control.  Tracking his symptoms was very helpful in catching this early.  With him, it was excessive urination, warm front feet, and white strings of goop from his eyes that tipped me off.  I am not going to lower the dose this spring as I want to be really ready for next autumn.  He  showed the most symptoms in December, so I will keep that in mind this year.  Just because his numbers were good in August doesn't mean that is still the case in November and December.

Any suggestions on management and testing are appreciated!

I am so grateful to have figured this out early!

Thanks,

Paula with Cory (IR) and Onyx (IR/PPID)

Bucks County, PA, USA

ECIR Primary Response

NRCplus 2011  ECIR 2014 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Cory

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1624

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Onyx




Re: Re-Leve Kentucky Equine Horse Feed

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Here's the ingredient list:

Ingredients: Soybean Hulls, Stabilized Rice Bran, Alfalfa Meal, Wheat Middlings, Soybean Meal, Beet Pulp, Soybean Oil, Molasses, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Choline Chloride, Zinc Sulfate, d-alpha Tocopheryl Acetate (source of natural vitamin E), Yeast Culture, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Mineral Oil, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, d-Biotin, Niacin Supplement, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement


--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Re: Re-Leve Kentucky Equine Horse Feed

celestinefarm
 

Cheryl, Ker's focus is on performance and racing industry horses. This feed appears to be designed for horses with PSSM , etc. and there is an ongoing debate regarding high fat diets being beneficial for horses with those types of metabolic disorders. I have a friend whose imported Warmblood struggled with Shivers and decided to follow a high fat diet for the horses via adding copious amounts of corn and vegetable oil to it's feed. It ended up with IR, laminitis, fat pads, etc. So I would caution you regarding this feed as it may be fine for horses in constant work, but for a recreational horse, or an idle one, the fat content may be over the top.

Dr. Kellon would have to address the actual vit and mineral content of this feed. The site doesn't list ingredients.....
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History


Re: TIBC results for Dr. Kellon - 2nd try

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Because the transferrin saturation (iron/TIBC x 100) is low at 38% and TIBC is appropriately high for the high iron intake, this picture is most compatible with chronic infection or chronic inflammation rather than iron overload.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 

EC Owner 2001


Re: Re-Leve Kentucky Equine Horse Feed

Lorna Cane
 

I just read down as far as Fat, in the analysis,and stopped there.

12.5% fat is way too high. We're looking for about 4%.


Ok, I lied,I spotted NSC. We don't use NSC any more,but rather ESC + Starch.

NSC is said to be 10%, but that doesn't tell us what the ESC is,nor the Starch.


--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario, Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002




Re: Question on Filling out Case history

Purexpressions@...
 

okay! thank you so much for clarifying


--
~ Lindsey Fortier

Feb.8,2017    Augusta, Maine



Re: Question on Filling out Case history

Lorna Cane
 

Yes.


--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario, Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002




Re-Leve Kentucky Equine Horse Feed

Cheryl
 

Has anyone used the above horse feed with positive results?  

https://ker.com/products/ker-products/united-states/re-leve/
--
Cheryl in MN

04-2016

Case history:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cheryl%20and%20Tom/Tom%20Case%20History.pdf

Tom's photo album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1961


Re: Question on Filling out Case history

Purexpressions@...
 

From the past?
--
~ Lindsey Fortier

Feb.8,2017    Augusta, Maine



Re: Question on Filling out Case history

Lorna Cane
 

Hi Lindsey,


Try to record everything you can think of,include any lab results, medications, feed, etc.


--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario, Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002




Question on Filling out Case history

Purexpressions@...
 

Ive looked all over but havent seen anything stating this(but who knows probably right in front of me;). Am I to fill out all the info for what was going on previously, before having a Laminitis episode and finding this site and implementing the Emergency Diet? Or just literally start from today what I'm doing now?

thanks and sorry if I over looked this info somewhere
--
~ Lindsey Fortier

Feb.8,2017    Augusta, Maine


79601 - 79620 of 282070