Date   

Re: Mild colic and hot weather (100 degrees.. low humidity,), and possible hi acth levels

LJ Friedman
 

Jesse looking good.. Less manure than usual and less drinking. I increased his salt.. up to 9 ozs total  in 3 meals.  and all his food was very slurpy. . And his urine stream was more or less clear,, but less quantity.   Today's hi temp was 105.F.  I did lots of hosing and walking.. i also added some mineral oil to each meal..  4 oz, 6o zs etc.  .. I didnt want to oil him.  Last time he was oiled.. he bled from the nostrils.. too much for my comfort.. but it was necessary. This time.. oiling wasnt suggested by the vet.. -Labs from yesterday showed mild dehydration and a mild elevation of a liver enzyme that is expected to return to normal soon.. Cornell blood  acht and insulin, drawn yesterday, were  prepped and frozen and will be sent out when temp cools. probably tomorrow or soon after..  ( Will post cbc shortly) - He is bright and happy.  Monday and Tues he was not himself and he  did become bright Tues evening.. Hoping that the worst is over.  
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014  San Diego, CA

 

 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=2117 

.https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/LJ%20and%20Jesse


Re: Looking for recommendations for a good trimmer in the portland oregon area.NOW.. im taking the leap ....

Julie Allen
 

Thanks everyone,
I did search data bases and none of the links came through , but I found a couple in toledo washington, who referenced Dr Kellon and the ECIR group 
http://www.equinewellnessservices.com/
here is  their web site if anyone is interested, they will travel out to the Boring Oregon area where my horses are located..i emailed them and they got right back to me..

if something seems amiss with them I will call Kay ,, Thank you all very much..

I know in my gut this is the right thing to do, but I really feel guilty I have become very good friends with my farrier so have my daughters with their horses..
he is a good guy tho and will understand.. Ill just miss him..
--
Julie with (new) pony in oregon
oct 2006

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=8750
https://ECIR.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Case%20History%20Form%20aria%20pony.doc


Re: Frequent swelling of my adopted horse who has laminitis

 

Hi, Janet, and welcome to the group! 

First things first: a swollen sheath in a gelding (or swollen udder in a mare) is a big red flag for insulin resistance, and possibly Cushing's (PPID), as well. Your job now, today, is to start your boy on the Temporary Emergency Diet.  More information below.

The ECIR provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

In order to help you and your equine quickly and effectively, we need you to explain your equine's situation by following the instructions you were sent upon joining. Your completed case history form and ECIR Signature will save days of back and forth questions. If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. Follow the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up and then upload your case history. If you have any trouble, just post a message or email the case history group explaining specifically where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin, glucose and Leptin. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating". Knowing this helps to differentiate if a horse is IR "at baseline" or if an elevated ACTH is "driving" the insulin up. In Europe, substituteadiponectin for the leptin test.

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medicationpergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APFThe best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine. If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spikeMake sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for IR/PPID individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to IR/PPID equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

 

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

 

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

We ask all members to sign their first name, general location, date of joining and link to the case history and photo album every time they post. It helps us to find your info faster to answer your questions better. You can set up an automatic signature so you don't have to remember to do it. 

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.
If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 

If the other hard-working volunteers could please follow up with Janet, I would be grateful.  We are at the confererence, , and things are starting to get busy.

Janet, ask any and all questions, and, again, welcome!

--

Jaini Clougher (BSc,BVSc)

Merlin (over the bridge) ,Maggie,Gypsy, Ranger

BC 09
ECIR mod/support

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy

 

 


Re: Insulin flare up with laminitis

 

Hi,Deb, and welcome to the list. I am sorry your boy is having such a hard time.  60 uIu/ml is a pretty high number for insulin (although we have certainly seen higher).

Welcome to the group! 

The ECIR provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

In order to help you and your equine quickly and effectively, we need you to explain your equine's situation by following the instructions you were sent upon joining. Your completed case history form and ECIR Signature will save days of back and forth questions. If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. Follow the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up and then upload your case history. If you have any trouble, just post a message or email the case history group explaining specifically where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin, glucose and Leptin. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating". Knowing this helps to differentiate if a horse is IR "at baseline" or if an elevated ACTH is "driving" the insulin up. 

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

Depending on where you live, you may also want to do a test for Lyme disease (the Lyme multiplex from Cornell).  

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medicationpergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APFThe best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine. If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spikeMake sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for IR/PPID individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to IR/PPID equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

 

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

 

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

We ask all members to sign their first name, general location, date of joining and link to the case history and photo album every time they post. It helps us to find your info faster to answer your questions better. You can set up an automatic signature so you don't have to remember to do it. 

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.
If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 

--I am at the conference at the moment, and things are going to start to get busy, so if the other hard-working volunteers can follow up with Deb, I would be grateful!
 

Jaini Clougher (BSc,BVSc)

Merlin (over the bridge) ,Maggie,Gypsy, Ranger

BC 09
ECIR mod/support

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy

 

 


Re: possible iron overload

Karen Warne
 

I am not sure how effective this is, but I did install this on Luke’s hose bib...
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006IX87S/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

--

Karen and Luke 

May 1 2017

Northern California

 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Luke

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=5921


Re: Insulin flare up with laminitis

marian kelly
 

Hey Deb,

I am new to this list and definitely not an expert, but I've read several places on this site that alfalfa can sometimes cause laminitis in certain horses. (I was feeding my guy alfalfa briefly thinking it was a good low-sugar option until I read that it can be a problem.)

I am certain that the folks here who know a lot more than me will chime in on the other topics. Good luck to both of you. Hope you pull through quickly!
--
Marian and Lupin
October 2017, Maryville TN
Lupin Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Marian%20and%20Lupin    .


Re: Looking for recommendations for a good trimmer in the portland oregon area

quatzie_baby@...
 

Call Kay she is very good trimmer.. I used her for my IR mare.
Jeannie
Salem, Oregon
2010 


Re: Looking for recommendations for a good trimmer in the portland oregon area

Jane Fletcher
 

Have a look on Pete Ramey and Jaime Jacksons websites and see if they list anyone near you. Good luck!!

Sent from my iPad

--
Jane, South East Western Australia
Nov 2016
Garnet and Bill


Re: Looking for recommendations for a good trimmer in the portland oregon area

Patty Franklin
 

I hope I'm not violating any rule here, but you seem lost and can make a good recommendation for the Portland, OR area. If I am in violation, I'm sorry and please take this post down.

Call Kay Stowers. She's in Aloha, but works all over the area (Yamhill, Multnomah, Columbia, Washington counties). Kay has been caring for my mare for three or four years now. She was the first to think last fall that Blessing's laminitis was probably linked to PPID and kept encouraging me to get her tested. She also helped me get boots to get Blessing through the freezing weather last winter. Very reasonably priced. Very committed to caring for horses. Very open to ECIR comments to improve your horse's trim. You can call her at 503-957-3332 or email her at shoelessnotclueless@.... Kay has been a barefoot trimmer for 15 years. 
--
Helen Connor and Blessing (IR/PPID)
May 2017
Scappoose, OR  USA

Blessing's Case History:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Helen%20and%20Blessing
Blessing's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6847 


Re: Monitoring Symptoms PDF. Now Safe Pasture Management

Helen Temps
 

Sometimes you can buy a pasture grass seed  a local nursery (not the big box stores).  You might try giving a few a call, they may have a native or drought resistant blend.
--

Helen Temps and Chloe  June 2017
Placerville, CA
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Helen%20and%20Chloe.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6929


ECIR Group - Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance #FACTS

main@ECIR.groups.io Integration <main@...>
 

By ECIR Group - Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance

Learn more about IR and PPID at ecirhorse.org


Re: Looking for recommendations for a good trimmer in the portland oregon area

LeeAnne Bloye <ecir.archives@...>
 


Hi Julie,
Have you checked the Regional Member's List?
There are 7 members from Oregon listed.  You'd have to see if any are close to you and try emailing for recommendations.  
The member's list is valuable as there may be members listed who may be able to help but may not be actively following messages at this time. 

--

- ​LeeAnne

ECIR Archivist, Newmarket, Ontario March 2004

Email Me - if link fails use ECIR.Archives at gmail dot com

Is your equine in the Pergolide Dosage Database? View the Pergolide Statistics

  Dawn's 10 Year Case History
     Taken For Granite Art

Quote of the moment: The human spirit must prevail over technology. - Albert Einstein
 


Re: Pain relief

LeeAnne Bloye <ecir.archives@...>
 

Hi Sue,
Your link works fine now :-)
Others will chime in but for now take a look at these files and see if they provide you with more insight:
Pain Medication and Alternatives 
Acetyl-L-Carnitine 

Hint: The file folders list in the wiki is a good place to start looking for information so you can become familiar with subjects while waiting for replies to messages. 
:-) 
--

- ​LeeAnne

ECIR Archivist, Newmarket, Ontario March 2004

Email Me - if link fails use ECIR.Archives at gmail dot com

Is your equine in the Pergolide Dosage Database? View the Pergolide Statistics

  Dawn's 10 Year Case History
     Taken For Granite Art

Quote of the moment: The human spirit must prevail over technology. - Albert Einstein
 


Frequent swelling of my adopted horse who has laminitis

jwbischler@...
 

I have had a bean removed from him by vet 2 months ago as we noticed his swollen sheath.  It went down a bit but within a month or two was back swollen again.  No bean this time after vet examined.  Sheath has not gone down.  Vet trying an antibiotic for a week.  After reading all this info.  Perhaps the only answer is to continue hay-only feed and get much more exercise for him.  Thoughts anyone?

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


IR

Diana Marquardt
 

Someone just asked me how prevalent IR is in the horse population?

Diana, Gala & Carmella


Re: ACTH level during seasonal rise

Deb
 

 Hi I'm so sorry to jump in right here but I'm  new to the group and having trouble posting and trying to get help quickly?? Where do I post? 
Thank you 


Insulin flare up with laminitis

Deb
 

Hi just joined this group for help. I have A 15 year old cutting ( smart little lena bred) quarter horse. Three years ago I found out the hard way that he was IR when he foundered after routine hock injections.  He had been injected a few times before with no problems but sadly it was the fall and I had no idea about the seasonal rise. He only had very slight rotation and one side and was actually back and going strong in 40 days I was even able to shown him again. I put him on a pretty strict diet and had no problems until this fall. Nothing changed in his diet  but I cannot get his crest down and he is pretty sore. He is negative on Cushing's,  negative for thyroid, his insulin was at 60 when we drew blood. I'm pretty sure he has laminitis again and I am at my wits end. Maybe I am not feeding him correctly? I did hours and hours and hours of research years ago and came up with a plan that seem to be working, but now it's not working. 
He gets Timothy grass in the morning, soaked alfalfa spread out over three feedings in the evening. 
He is supplemented with 6 ounces of flax,  remission and a small amount of special care. I'm soaking his Timothy now  in the morning also. he's at home so I'm able to feed him anyway I wish. I bed his stall very deep,  he's on 250 mg of Banamine twice a day and I'm Icing him with ice boots. No heat and a slight pulse on one side. The only thing I can think may have happened was  he was feeling really good right before this happened (running and bucking  in the arena and I think he injured his stifle and I'm wondering if because the injury happened in the fall and raised his cortisol level and sent him over the edge? It was really bad timing because it was fall  and I could no longer ride him with his injury so that exasperated things. Any help would be truly appreciated!! 


possible iron overload

Sue Hansen
 

I am wondering if iron overload is the problem with my laminic mare, Dawn.  Our water is extremely high in iron.  Can anyone suggest an iron filter?

--
Sue H.
June 2017. Markle, IN USA
Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sue%20and%20Dawn  .


Re: ACTH level during seasonal rise

grandmalynn44
 

Thank you Dr. Kellon. Since Bodie is not IR, only PPID, I’ll just continue to monitor him, but keep the pergolide dosage the same for now.  

Lynn and Mica, May 2011
N. California 


Pain relief

Sue Hansen
 

Dawn is suffering with pain and doesn't want to move.   I have Jiaogulan Plus liquid drops.  Will that help her with circulation in the hooves?  What about  Uckele Acetyl L-Carnitine HCL 98%, L-arginine alphaketoglutarate to help with pain, Uckele's LaminOx - which has the Jiaogulan and the AAKG, phyto Quench?  

I have vitamins and minerals from Uckele for balancing her hay, plus I have included Cocosoya to cover the taste.  So far she gets very little of it since I am trying to get her used to the flavors.  She's on 3.5 Prescend tablets per day.  My farrier is coming out in the next few days to pull the shoes my vet recommended and I will put her back in her SoftRide boots or would you recommend not using them.  She has complete stall rest.

The last time I had a question, there was difficulty getting to my case history.  
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Sue H.
June 2017. Markle, IN USA
Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sue%20and%20Dawn  .

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