Date   

Re: 2 months after initial laminitis episode

Sherry Morse
 


To do that:
1) Go to this link to amend your auto-signature: https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/editsub

2) Look at the bottom of that page for the window that has your signature in it

3) Add the link to your case history folder and make sure you make it "live". Adding a space after your link or hitting enter on your keyboard will turn it blue.

4) IMPORTANT: Scroll to the bottom and hit SAVE!

That way we can easily find this information.  Once you add pictures you'll update your signature again the same way.


If you have a dry lot and Patches is comfortable moving around there's no reason that she can't be let out to move about as she wants UNLESS she's acting up and doing herself more damage because she's feeling so much better.  In that case we recommend a smaller area but movement is really helpful to keep circulation going, decrease other soundness issues and even some movement can help with weight loss as needed. 

As far as the current feeding program - without knowing her ideal and current weight there's no way for us to know if 20lbs is enough, too much or too little.  If she needs to lose more weight and she's losing it on that amount then it's probably ok.  If she's not losing weight and needs to, then she needs less...

Is she still being fed the Triumph and the Essential K?  At 8% fat and 33% Sugar + starch the Triumph would blow the feet off most horses on this group (if not most horses in general) so if she's even possibly IR that shouldn't be fed.  The Essential K is also unsuitable for a suspected IR horse with a sugar+starch of 12.5% and a fat content of 6% so she should be off of that as well. 

If you could post trim pictures ASAP Lavinia may be able to get you markups before the next farrier visit.  I would guess you're seeing white line separation in her foot?




Re: Success syringing metformin

Amadadelsol@...
 

Thank you for the thoughts on flax. I found extremely high quality soft gel capsules. Each one has 1000 mg organic, cold expeller pressed oil. Each also contains 550 mg ALA, 150 mg cis-linolenic acid, and 140 mg Oleic acid. Frigga is about 825 lbs. How many capsules would she get per day? Thank you!!
--
Pat and Frigga
Monkton, VT
2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=252741  

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Pat%20and%20Frigga


Horsehair jewelry (was Re: [ECIR] Squamous Cell Carcinoma)

Sherry Morse
 

This is a tad off topic but Marcia there are a number of people who do this - "horsehair jewelry" as a Google search will give you tons of options.  We have a local woman nearby who does some amazing work but after almost 3 years I've managed to get the bag with Scarlet's mane and tail into the car (from the trunk where it was being stored) and I haven't gotten further than that. 




Re: Star received her wings

Buzz
 

What beautiful words from an obviously caring husband! Im truly  so sorry for your loss. 
--
Marsha and Dame - Buzzy TN 2019

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Marsha%20and%20Dame%20-%20Buzzy


Re: Star received her wings

celestinefarm
 

Jan, i'm sorry for you loss of Star and in admiration of the beautiful obit your husband wrote.  To answer you question, we have had other members in the past have horses who had long term PPID and who eventually presented with severe neurological signs. Head pressing , sudden blindness, and loss of balance.  One person who had her horse necropsied found that the enlargement of the pituitary was enough that it was pressing on the ocular nerve and the underside of the brain causing the horse to press against a wall and stagger.  And of course , there is no treatment except to let them out of the torment.  Opening gates to let them leave for their next adventure is hard, but knowing we shall see them again some day makes it easier. Take care.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Juniper Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Juniper/Case%20history%20Juniper.pdf .


Re: Squamous Cell Carcinoma

celestinefarm
 

Allison, heartfelt condolences to you. Take comfort in the fact that you did everything for him you could, and by taking him by yourself to the hospital , you saved him possibly weeks of suffering while you were trying to treat him with such limited information. It's so hard to face their mortality, but he is free now, and he knows you did this to help him and to free him when there was no more help. His is most certainly grateful and you will always be in his big heart.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Juniper Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Juniper/Case%20history%20Juniper.pdf .


Update on Ruger and pergolide dosage advice please

riggslippert@...
 

Hello,

My first horse with PPID, Ruger, just celebrated his 4 year anniversary of colic surgery to remove a jejunal (small bowel) carcinoma.  I diagnosed him with seasonal PPID last year and started treatment in late September.  He's done better this year since I started in early August and kept him on APF Pro fairly consistently, although I still feel like I'm "chasing the seasonal rise".  He has continued to receive increased flax and Top 3 Aminos supplementation.  There has been less muscle loss and he's maintained his social status in the herd, but he is still lethargic and more spooky than normal.  His most recent test results showed ACTH of 308 pg/mL (9-35 pg/mL) 3 weeks after increasing his Prascend to 2 mg QD.  I have since increased him to 2.5 mg QD.  I'm wondering if I should increase further to 3 mg QD or recheck his ACTH on the lower dosage?  Does this pattern of increase give any indication of whether he will need the pergolide year round now?  His case history is up to date.  Thank you in advance for any advice!
--
Aunna
October 2018
Oakland County, Michigan, USA
Cadet Case History:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Aunna%20and%20Cadet
Ruger Case History:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Aunna%20and%20Ruger

Cadet Photo Album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=84102




Re: Squamous Cell Carcinoma

marcia <marcia@...>
 

Bobby I have saved all my cat , dog and horse hair to make something of it one day.  Do you know anybody that does this.  I have looked on the internet with no luck.

 

Thanks

Marcia TX            2020

 

From: main@ECIR.groups.io [mailto:main@ECIR.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bobbie Day
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 1:17 PM
To: main@ECIR.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ECIR] Squamous Cell Carcinoma

 

Allison I am so so sorry. It’s obvious how much you loved each other. I hope you’ll take a part of mane or tail and have a keepsake made if you haven’t already. That’s one of my biggest regrets when I lost my heart horse, he was my faithful companion for thirty years and I was so distraught when I lost him I didn’t even think about getting some hair. You did absolutely everything you could, I hope you don’t ever beat yourself up about this there are some things that are just out of our control.
best to you I’m sorry again 
--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821


--
Marcia M
Texas
2020


Attn New Member Rose Miller

 

Hello Rose Miller,
Welcome to the ECIR Main Group. You haven't asked for help or advice for an equine but I thought you might have a Cushings horse? We request that members who want  advice for a specific equine take the following steps laid out below in our New Member Primary Response message. In the column to the left you will see a "FILES" category and our "WIKI" link. The files hold a wealth of information, organized by topic. The files are searchable, the search "button" is at the top of each page. In fact you can do searches of the messages right here. 

I hope you take advantage of the group knowledge. 


Welcome to the group! 

The ECIR Group provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

Have you started your Case History? If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. We appreciate you following the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up with the documents inside. Go to this CH message with info on how to use various devices and forms. If you have any trouble, just post a message to let us know where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin and glucose.

The fat-derived hormone leptin is also usually abnormally elevated in insulin resistance but because there are many other things which can lower or increase leptin ECIR is not recommending routine testing for this hormone. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating".

In Europe, adiponectin is tested instead of leptin. Adiponectin helps regulate glucose and fat burning, and maintain insulin sensitivity. Low levels are associated with EMS. It has come to be preferred over leptin because it is not influenced by things like weight or exercise, and also because it was the only factor other than insulin levels that predicted laminitis risk

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medication pergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APF. The best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine. If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spike. Make sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for IR/PPID individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to IR/PPID equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable. In general, laminitic hooves require more frequent trim adjustments to maintain the proper alignment so we recommend the use of padded boots rather than fixed appliances (i.e. shoes, clogs), at least during the initial phases of treatment.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.

If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 

 

--
Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


Re: Need help for my Haflinger mare with Laminitis

 

Hello Kathi,
I lived in Maryland for about 30 years. Listen, do not give up on your horse! This group helped me get my horse thru Laminits. What I learned is that owner's (like me) hate to see their horses in pain. Many vets get bombarded by their customers fears and worry and just advise the owners to let the horse go. My personal thoughts are that a lot of laminitis cases are put down that would recover with the needed care.  

Do you have your horse in "THERAPY BOOTS"? There are several boots designed for horses who are experiencing hoof pain. The thick insert pads inside the boots will support the horse's soles and aid to relieve their pain. Easycareinc.com sells the CLOUD Therapy boot. I used this boot type for my horse. It's OK if your horse lays down as long as they are eating/drinking/peeing/pooping. Your horse will get a lot of relief from boots.

 Below is our new member welcome and instructional document. My advice is to immediately start with the Emergency Diet. If there is any form of sugars or starches in you Balancer STOP feeding it. Insulinwise will not improve the situation and can be stopped. We want you to read all the sections below. Give them an overview, including the TRIM section. 

If you can't get boot immediately you can get thick, soft supportive pads and duct tape the pads to the bottom of the hooves. Shoes are NOT useful because they do not support the soles and sole support is all-important.

If you haven't already joined the case history sub-group please get that done. Creating your case history folder and case history document will let you share your horses health/diet/blood tests, etc, with our moderators.

Welcome to the group! 

The ECIR Group provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

Have you started your Case History? If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. We appreciate you following the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up with the documents inside. Go to this CH message with info on how to use various devices and forms. If you have any trouble, just post a message to let us know where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin and glucose.

The fat-derived hormone leptin is also usually abnormally elevated in insulin resistance but because there are many other things which can lower or increase leptin ECIR is not recommending routine testing for this hormone. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating".

In Europe, adiponectin is tested instead of leptin. Adiponectin helps regulate glucose and fat burning, and maintain insulin sensitivity. Low levels are associated with EMS. It has come to be preferred over leptin because it is not influenced by things like weight or exercise, and also because it was the only factor other than insulin levels that predicted laminitis risk

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medication pergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APF. The best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine. If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spike. Make sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for IR/PPID individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to IR/PPID equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable. In general, laminitic hooves require more frequent trim adjustments to maintain the proper alignment so we recommend the use of padded boots rather than fixed appliances (i.e. shoes, clogs), at least during the initial phases of treatment.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.

If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 

 


ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


Re: Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Bobbie Day
 

Allison I am so so sorry. It’s obvious how much you loved each other. I hope you’ll take a part of mane or tail and have a keepsake made if you haven’t already. That’s one of my biggest regrets when I lost my heart horse, he was my faithful companion for thirty years and I was so distraught when I lost him I didn’t even think about getting some hair. You did absolutely everything you could, I hope you don’t ever beat yourself up about this there are some things that are just out of our control.
best to you I’m sorry again 
--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821


Re: Star received her wings

 


-- I cannot see through my tears.  My heart goes out to you 
Jackie Decker and Tori
June 2016
White City, Oregon


Re: Star received her wings

Nancy C
 

I am so sorry, Tina.  Letting them go is the last best gift we can give them, but it is so very, very hard.

Thinking of you both.
--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President/Treasurer  2019-2020
Join us at the 2021 NO Laminitis! Conference, August 12-15, Harrisburg, PA


Re: Star received her wings

Rose Miller <Rosemiller@...>
 

So sorry for your loss, and the tribute is awesome.

 

From: main@ECIR.groups.io [mailto:main@ECIR.groups.io] On Behalf Of jasperandstarsmom@... via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 8:29 AM
To: main@ECIR.groups.io
Subject: [ECIR] Star received her wings

 

Last week I lost my best friend Star. She had sedation for routine floating on Thursday but did strange side stepping in one direction as the sedative wore off. She seemed fine once recovered. We dismissed it, as she did a similar thing the year before while recovering from sedation. However, her routine bloodwork showed a new change, an elevated Calcium level, possibly indicating cancer. I received those results Saturday morning, which was not much warning for the cascade of events that followed, starting with what masqueraded as severe colic that Saturday night, but by Sunday, was neurologic signs (repetitive spinning and circling). Star's condition was intermittent, giving us hope for improvement several times. We treated her with IV fluids, steroids, also, and banamine for days, but we were never able to taper. She had a great day Wednesday, but relapsed Wednesday night, with no rest from the circling. By Thursday morning I knew what needed to be done, and that afternoon I released my dear friend to become an angel's trusted mount. 
I have been trying to recover from the shock of all this, but I know that my decision was right on time, not a day early or a day late. I am thankful I received a few extra days with my friend. I will do the final update on Star's case history at some point, but need some time. I wonder if advanced Cushings can present like this, with neurologic signs, but I guess we will never know, and perhaps it no longer matters. I want to thank the members of this group that helped me with keeping Star healthy to the end. She looked absolutely amazing. Having controlled PPID, good diet, and good hoof care helped her exceedingly.
Below is the obituary that my husband wrote for Star. Over the years he had trouble understanding the depth of my love for this horse, but seemed to understand and respect that at the end, and helped me make her departure better.

Ponaganset Nightstar “Star”

 

4-17-1989 to 10-8-2020

 

Amazing Morgan Horse and Beloved Friend

 

Ponaganset Nightstar, know by most as Star, was paired with her soon-to-be constant companion (an extremely excited 16-year-old Tina) when she was just a filly. A beautiful Chestnut Morgan, she had a white sock on her right hind hoof, and a white star on her forehead. While she was birthed in Rhode Island, she would also call Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and finally Wisconsin, home.

 

Star was an amazing horse, with a calm temperament, and an industrious appetite (she loved grass, grain, apples, and carrots). Tina trained her for English riding, endurance trail riding, and even driving. When it came to driving, Star was a sight to see. She would pick up her front hooves as if she was a million-dollar show horse, and would take Tina anywhere she wanted to go.

 

Star later foaled Jasper, who was by her side from his birth, until June of 2015, when he was given to a gentle old man who needed a friend. When Star and Jasper were side-by-side, they became the perfect driveway alarms, as they would shrill, whinny, and nicker anytime a vehicle approached. Perhaps they thought a new friend was arriving, or perhaps they thought it was a grain truck. In any case, they were both there to greet you.

 

When Star moved to Wisconsin in 2015, she thrived on the abundant green grass, longer summers, and lowered allergens. She boarded at two different locations, across two years, before moving to her own barn and pasture. Despite being a senior horse at this point, Tina was still able to ride her and even drove her on occasion. While Star did not have any animal companions here, she did have a person who gave her the most exceptional care, attention, and love that any horse could imagine. She had many visitors that would take time to brush, feed, or spend time with her.

 

Today, the 8th day of October 2020, Star was laid to rest after a week-long battle with the sudden onset of neurological issues, potentially from cancer. She fell asleep looking into the eyes of her beloved human companion, Tina, and the sweet smell of fresh grass in the breeze. She will be dearly missed by many, but not to the extent of her owner and friend, who will never forget all the years of fun, companionship, and comfort that she brought. She is now loose in the fields of heaven, free of all pain, eating grass to her heart’s desire.

--
-Tina
Jan 2018, Waldo, WI
Star Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Tina%20and%20Star
Star Photos https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=26772


--
Rose Miller in Arizona 2020


Need help for my Haflinger mare with Laminitis

Kathi.duvall@...
 

Hi all, my beautiful Haflinger mare came down with a bout of laminitis a week ago Saturday. She has been laying down only at night. She is in a small paddock getting soaked Timothy hay, a ration balancer along with Insulinwise, bute and a thyroid med the vet put her on to get some weight off of her. She seemed to be making a tiny bit of progress but last night she never laid down and she seems worse today. I am desperately trying to know what to do. I hate the prospect of losing her and I know my vet will suggest putting her down!
--
Kathi Duvall in MD 2019


Re: 2 months after initial laminitis episode

W.phyllis60@...
 

Hi Sherry,
This is a lot of information and I am still trying to process it all.  I created my case history and uploaded today.  I have no pictures yet but will try to get those soon.  I will also try and get hay tested in the near future.  In the last couple days Patches has really improved and is the best I have seen her without any bute.  She is moving pretty freely in her stall where before she hesitated to move.  She still occasionally favors the right front but nothing like she was. The right front had separated lamina whereas the left front does not.  This all happened within a couple days.  Is this typical? Assume I should keep her stalled for the time being and continue with the feeding schedule I have her on unless i hear otherwise from your group.  In the meantime, I will continue reading all of the information on this website.
Thanks so much
--
Phyllis W in OH 2020


Re: Star received her wings

tosborne@...
 

I am so very sorry
--
Teresa O in Ontario, Canada 2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Teresa%20and%20Snickers


Re: APF Primer for Newbies

LJ Friedman
 

that post was from auburn labs
--
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


Re: Squamous Cell Carcinoma

tosborne@...
 

Damn.  I am so sorry Allison
--
Teresa O in Ontario, Canada 2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Teresa%20and%20Snickers


Re: Star received her wings

Bobbie Day
 

Oh Tina,
I am so very sorry for your loss of Star. She was very lucky to have you in her life.
Run free Star ⭐️


--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821

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