Date   

Re: Equioxx

Brenda Gasch Mittelstadt
 

Hello Kelly,

I am not going to answer your question as I do not know the answer. I have a mare that's been on Equioxx for a half year or so for some unknown back issues that cause her spasms and then a light laminitis in March and possibly arthritis. I just am interested to hear you say that the group does not recommend NSAIDS and, as a newer participant, I did not know that. Can you expand on the reason and also what you think the risk is? I've been told the Equioxx (by my vet) is super safe. I also see a much happier mare like your Micah. Mine is Daisy. 

I did hear about STP with the yucca and a couple other things and am considering that. 

Sorry to not answer but really am interested in the reply so wanted to add my voice. I'll be interested in other's ideas. 

THANK YOU!
--
-Brenda

September 2020, Dodgeville WI USA

Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Brenda%20and%20Stormy


Re: Insulin Testing

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kelli,

I would suggest contacting Chaffe hay's manufacturer directly and ask them for the guaranteed analysis including ESC and starch numbers so you know if it's safe to feed to your guy.

As far as the mini-melt tabs.  They are not necessarily the best form of pergolide.  We've had a few members use them with varying levels of success.  Most members prefer to use the capsules which can either be dissolved in water and syringed or put into a treat and fed directly to the horse.  If you're counting on putting the medication into grain and it being eaten there is always a chance that not all of it is going into the horse.





Re: Willow test results, x-rays and exercise recommendation

Pat
 

I've got her on tested hay, with amino trace + and j-herb, flax, salt.
Regardless of her tests, I intend to keep her on this diet and no grazing. Forever.  (-:
--
Pat
August 2020
Metro Vancouver BC Canada
Case: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Pat%20and%20Willow
Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=253325


Re: Willow test results, x-rays and exercise recommendation

Pat
 

Thanks! Good to know.  I don't mind not doing a lot of exercise but other people sure worry about it.  I think I will have 10 mins of hand walking, ten mins of riding (just so she doesn't forget) and no trotting.  At least until after Christmas.

There was a trim done just after the x-rays were taken. Another scheduled soon.

When I click on my case history link in my signature, I see three case histories, the first one (no date), one dated Oct 14 and the one dated Oct 26. Can you see any of them or just not the Oct 26th one?

Her test results were:
Glucose 7.13
Insulin 14.4

Calculator says:
Gi 7.13
Risqi 0.26
Mirg 5.8

--
Pat
August 2020
Metro Vancouver BC Canada
Case: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Pat%20and%20Willow
Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=253325


Re: Insulin Testing

Kelli Land
 

Thank you Dr. Kellon.  We will be doing the cornel metabolic panel on him this week.... he is eating better this week now ,,,, and more life to him. I think he maybe have been depressed with his pasture pal passing as well. He has another horse to hang with but this is a youngster and a bit of kid still. I live in an area that it is hard to get appropriate feed. Small community feed stores won't carry more then what they feel will sell.... even with a commitment. I had totally dropped his feed to pellets only ,, no forage due to his dental health and recommendations of our equine dentist. He right now is happy with getting a bit of forage and no Bermuda pellets,, plus  increased his LMF SR low carb....since that is a complete feed. I also added brewers yeast recently as well.  

Finding Teff around my area is near impossible,, however there are some places south of me or north of me to buy if I don't want to travel 2-4 hours to go get it. Feed stores just wont bring it in. Timothy is also hard to find,,, and again I can travel a bit to get it. These are not favorite options since quantity only makes it affordable and reasonable, and I don't have enough storage to put up 80 bales of hay right now, only a few at a time.
I know Teff pellets are made up in Oregon, but again I cant convince any feed store in Cali to even carry the stuff. argg frustrating for sure.

I have been soaking the orchard alfalfa,,,, until we work thru this problem. My memory from last year this time of year after I increased his pergolide to the fall winter dose he did this as well but not as bad and not loosing weight. It seemed to happen very quickly. Such my concern.  I am working on the case paper ,,,, to get uploaded to the site as we speak. It made me feel a bit better when he was eating better over the weekend,,, and he was not dogging about. We actually did a trail ride locally and he was in the lead single footing down the trail with bouncy ears with his gaiting friends in tow.

One product I can get locally is Chaffe hay. The feed store that will carry my LMF feed was sharing info on the product and my needs as I was pushing again for the teff pellets/hay/timothy pellets/cubes. Chaffe promotes the benefits well, but their analysis is hard to put into perspective to what other feeds have to offer. It seems palatable as I tried a sample and he did eat after walking away from it initially. I am reading about it... but I did not see it as one of the approved feeds on the list from the website.

I am also researching the compounded formulas. I get it why prascend is recommended over compounded pergolide. In asking about the compounded formulas,,, I like the mini melt tabs. That has been the hardest part of treating this horse... as we all know hates the taste so I mix it with a bit of pellets before he gets his feed so I see he gets it. however when he wasn't feeling so good I was out of town and the other horse went down so Who know if the was getting it correctly with the house sitter I would hope so.... but...
I found the cost more reasonable with the compounded formula so going to work thru what I have and move to the compounded formula. Crap 3 times amount of medicine for the same cost  no brainer..... I always thought doing the compounded way was not the best but that was early days when it was only liquid and it was harder to manage the liquid formula and shelf stability was short lived. So very excited. In the mean time I am going to try taking  the pills a i have and grind them up to put in a capsule and see if that works better in getting it in his body. 

So again thank you for your direction and ideas ,,, and a great website... I was on it when we started this journey 5 years ago. but had put it away ,,,, maybe a older and wiser has made it stick more in my brain..... It certainly is helping me now.

of course i will keep chugging on his case file,,, and get it uploaded when done... it was a bit daunting when I started it,,, but working thru it... 

thank you 

Kelli Land, RVT

On Monday, October 26, 2020, 08:29:11 AM PDT, Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...> wrote:


This study found that insulin testing of samples taken into an EDTA plasma tube (purple top) showed significantly lower levels than serum (red top) or heparin (green top) samples. Best stability when testing is going to be delayed beyond 3 days is heparinized samples.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31617618/

If you are using Cornell's ACTH/insulin/leptin panel the sample will be EDTA unless the vet also draws a separate serum sample and requests that be used for insulin.

Bottom Line: Use serum or heparin tubes for insulin testing. Varying sample type between tests will not give you accurate results.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


--

--

Kelli L. in CA 2020


Re: Willow test results, x-rays and exercise recommendation

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Pat,

Thanks for adding the rads.

There is no bony column rotation but there is a slight bit of capsular rotation - which is a trim issue due to her much-too-long toes. Heels are underrun as well. There appears to be some sinking, which goes along with the thin soles. Some arthritic changes on P2 as well.

Until the trim gets optimized, I wouldn't recommend formal exercise as it is going to exacerbate the pull on the laminar connections from the long toes, causing more damage.

Definitely should keep her in padded boots until the sole depth increases, which won't happen until the toes are shortened.

Sorry, but I don't see a 10-26 case history for her in your file.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Re: Updated Case History, please help

Loreto Hosking
 

Re pergolide compounded in oil:

I changed from Prascend to compounded pergolide in oil several years ago, when my two PPID thoroughbreds hit doses required in the teens.

This formulation kept them in the reference range for years, with appropriate testing and dose adjustment. As a vet I am fortunate to be able to manage all of this myself.

My current crop of 3 PPID horses have also been on the oil preparation for years, keeping their ACTH in the mid- high-teens. They are routinely tested twice a year and the dose adjusted. Currently they are on between 4 and 8 mg of pergolide mesylate.

It’s easy to adjust and simple to administer, and at least in my case, appears to have very good stability.

Loreto Hosking


--
Loreto Hosking
Emerald, Vic, Australia
Flecky, Cruiser, Charlie and Pretzel (dec)
Poppy, Merlin and Toby
January 2016 approximately 


Willow test results, x-rays and exercise recommendation

Pat
 

Hello,

Will saw vet for second time on Oct 4 and vet says laminitic episode has passed. Took x-rays, these are posted in her album. We see a slight rotation.
Vet took blood tests; results are in the Oct 26 case study. Non-IR by lab ranges, compensated IR via calculator.

We have been walking her for 20-30 mins 3-4 days per week until this weekend. On Oct 4 vet ok'd her for 20 mins riding, 5 mins trot in her boots. We've done that once. 
Last week she seemed sore one day but after a day or two of boots, is ok again.

Trims and hoof reshaping ongoing.

It looks like we are road to recovery, with proper hay, proper supplements but I just wanted to see what you thought of the x-rays and the recommendation for exercise. I'd like to keep her at the 20 mins max 3-4 times per week (in boots) for a few months I think.

Thanks!
Pat
--
Pat
August 2020
Metro Vancouver BC Canada
Case: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Pat%20and%20Willow
Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=253325


Re: advice for long time PPID mare with chronic laminitis

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Karla,

I couldn't find a CH for your mare so that's going to make it difficult to assess everything that is going on with her.  However, for this time of year, given that she's on pergolide, her ACTH should be lower and her insulin is right on the edge of the laminitis danger zone.  There's a good chance the lack of interest in eating is simply that she feels lousy.  We often talk about PPID horses experiencing the veil and going off feed when first started on the medication, but not wanting to eat can also be an indication of PPID not being well controlled. 

If this was my horse I'd want to get her ACTH number down by increasing her pergolide and I'd also be looking at treating her as an IR horse and trying to get that insulin down as well.

As far as being foot sore - has she had x-rays recently?  What does her trim look like?  Are you using boots or any kind of hoof protection for her?



Re: Attn New Member: Marlene L in Idaho

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Marlene,

TBs are not known for being IR at baseline but they can develop IR (which could show as a cresty neck and fat deposits) as an offshoot of being PPID (commonly known as Cushings).  If you're mare were mine I'd be having bloodwork pulled to get her ACTH level checked - Bonnie outlined the details on this in your welcome letter.  You can add glucose and insulin to that as well to confirm if she is/isn't IR at this point.  The fact that she's now had 3 cases of laminitis is very suspicious for it being related to PPID, especially if all 3 instances have occurred in the fall. 

Feeding a horse apples could possibly cause laminitis in a horse with IR, but again, that's not very common in TBs.  Also, it was in the past and you can't change the past so you need to focus on getting her better.

If you can get a case history started and photos/xrays posted on the Case History group (details on all this are in the welcome letter) we'll be able to help you assess if her current trim is correct or if it needs to be corrected to help her heal. If the shoe was put on a hoof that wasn't trimmed as it should be it could be causing more issues than it's helping.  For this reason we prefer to leave horses that have had laminitis barefoot and keep them booted for comfort as it enables more frequent trims to be done. 

Even with shoes on you can use styrofoam taped to the bottom of your mares feet to help her feel better, it just may not have the same effect as if she had no shoes on.

IF the laminitis is metabolic in origin Bute will not help so it's good that she's off of it, but the Meloxicam is just another NSAID and also will not help her.  What will help is finding out what's causing the laminitis, removing the trigger and getting her trim and diet in order. 



Re: Missed Dose of Prascend

Carla Anderson Peters
 

Sherry,
Thank you. 

--
Carla

 

December 2013, WI

Cupcake and Gunnar's Case Histories 

Cupcake's Photos

Gunnar's Photos 

Ω



Re: Equioxx

Kelly Kathleen Daughtry
 

That's very encouraging. So long as it does not worsen her chances of foundering, I think the risks are worth it. It really does seem to be affecting her quality of life in a positive way. Thanks so much for responding!

--
Kelly & Micah, Clayton NC

April 2016

Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kelly%20and%20%20Micah 

Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1829  .

 

 

          


Re: Equioxx

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kelly,

Dr. Kellon will no doubt be able to explain this better, but for both horses and humans there are drawbacks to long term NSAID use.  As you're not using Equioxx in an effort to treat something that won't benefit from it the circumstances are slightly different than using it to treat a laminitis episode (for example).  You would be best off discussing the risks of long term NSAID use with your vet who is most familiar with Micah's care.




Re: Missed Dose of Prascend

Sherry Morse
 

LJ,

Please read the entire email - Carla said she realized it at 6am this morning and did give a dose at that time.  Her question was if it was ok to give today's dose at the usual time to get back on the regular schedule.




Re: Questions concerning recent PPID diagnosis

anneefrancis@...
 

That's a lot of calories.  I'm going to get a proper weight on her this week as well...and will cease killing her with kindness.

Anne
May 2016

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Anne%20and%20Tricana


Re: Attn New Member: Marlene L in Idaho

LJ Friedman
 


--If you want immediate relief, get your horse in boots with pads. Right now you can buy Styrofoam and tape it onto the feet. You’ll see videos on how to do this 
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


Attn New Member: Marlene L in Idaho

 

Hello Marlene,
Since your first post to our group was made within another member's post with replies to her I have copied your first post as a new member into a new topic so we can concentrate on your questions and what your mare needs.

Your post:
I am new to the group and not sure if I'm following protocol for communications.
 
My 18 year old TB mare is demonstrating classic founder symptoms: all weight on her back end, can barely move, used to lay down a lot and not so much now.  She has foundered before in 2017 and 2019 but very very very minor compared to this.  She does not have a cresty neck or long hair like Cushings.  I feed my horses apples once in a while to flush their liver (according to a vet) and I'm wondering if that is what caused this episode to happen.  Symptoms started very slowly the first of Sept (feeding apples) and has progressed to where she is now.  Xrays show slight rotation of coffin bones and slight modeling of left coffin bone.  I have a journeyman farrier who got her shod properly but she is NOT getting any better.  I've had her on 2 grams of Bute twice a day until I caught her leaning and bouncing her belly (right side, always the right side) off her water bucket and knew I had to stop the Bute.  So....I committed the cardinal sin and put her on my ringbone horses' Meloxicam.....  She seemed to improve minutely and is not having the gastric problems now, but has plateaued and is still in great pain.  It's been about 5 weeks.  When is enough, enough?  Her front feet are cold and there is no digital pulse.  Do I need to have her tested for insulin resistance or something?
 
Y'all are my last hope.  This horse makes my life whole.  This is killing me.  Please help.
 
Marlene
Idaho
2020


Marlene,
One of the toughest things that you are dealing with right now is seeing your horse in pain. Pain medications don't really help with laminitis. But just realize that there are many things you can do for your horse to start her recovering. Pain passes, don't let it overwhelm you emotionally. With the correct steps and care most horses can recover from laminitis. My horse did, and you can read posts from all these members if you need convincing that YES YOU CAN!

Below you will find our "New Member" document. It is organized into sections which you need to read and explore. There are many "blue colored" links which when clicked on will take you to detailed info.  USE THE LINKS! This group also has a detailed website and the link to the website is right at the top. DIAGNOSIS and TREATMENT sections will explain a lot to you. The DIET section is what you can do RIGHT NOW for your horse. Put your mare onto the EMERGENCY DIET immediately. This is a key step for your horse that you can take right now. NO MORE APPLES! No grain, no sugars, etc. and begin soaking her hay. Hay often has very high sugar and/or starch levels. Soaking her hay (unknown sugar levels until it is tested) will reduce the sugar levels. 

Yes, you do need to have blood tests done, this is explained in the DIAGNOSIS section. Request that your vet use the procedures and protocols that ECIR recommends. Our website had a good section explaining the diagnostic steps. I found it helped to get my vet onboard with  the ECIR protocol steps by giving her links to the ECIR website. Another vet I copied sections from the website and emailed those to him.


--

Welcome to the group! 

The ECIR Group provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

Have you started your Case History? If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. We appreciate you following the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up with the documents inside. Go to this CH message with info on how to use various devices and forms. If you have any trouble, just post a message to let us know where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin and glucose.

The fat-derived hormone leptin is also usually abnormally elevated in insulin resistance but because there are many other things which can lower or increase leptin ECIR is not recommending routine testing for this hormone. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating".

In Europe, adiponectin is tested instead of leptin. Adiponectin helps regulate glucose and fat burning, and maintain insulin sensitivity. Low levels are associated with EMS. It has come to be preferred over leptin because it is not influenced by things like weight or exercise, and also because it was the only factor other than insulin levels that predicted laminitis risk

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medication pergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APF. The best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine. If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spike. Make sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for IR/PPID individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to IR/PPID equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable. In general, laminitic hooves require more frequent trim adjustments to maintain the proper alignment so we recommend the use of padded boots rather than fixed appliances (i.e. shoes, clogs), at least during the initial phases of treatment.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.

If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 


Re: Missed Dose of Prascend

LJ Friedman
 

Im interested to know why you wouldn’t dose immediately upon realizing you missed the evening dose and then just figure out a way to get back to the right schedule?  why wait?
--
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


advice for long time PPID mare with chronic laminitis

prtcKarla
 

My 28 year old Arab mare, Steffie has continued to have laminitis problems.  She was diagnosed with PPID in 2014.  She has had some front foot pain for at least 10 years.  She had gotten better being on Pergolide compound but the last year has gradually gotten worse.  It is also very difficult to maintain her weight.  She is a picky eater.  I recently had her re-tested at Cornell.  I am having trouble getting the results up but will try again.  Here are her test results.   Glucose 88, normal 71-122 mg/dL
ACTH 54.8, normal 9-35 pg/mL
Insulin 79.36, normal10-40 ulU/mL
Leptin 9.02, normal1-10 ng/mL

She is currently getting 3.44 Pergolide Mesylate in an oil base from Pet Health which I believe is about 2.29 Pergolide.  It seems to me that she needs a higher dose of Pergolide.  While the vet did the testing, he is difficult to reach to go over the test.  Your help is very appreciated.  Right now she is refusing to eat.

prtcKarla
ND 2013 


Equioxx

Kelly Kathleen Daughtry
 

I  updated my case history to include that I started giving Micah  Equioxx daily at the end of August (surgery for torn Manica Flexoria in 2018; I can only ride her for 30 minutes under saddle at a walk).    It has been a real game changer. She is so much happier to the point that other people have remarked on it at the barn.  The two times Micah has foundered have been in December (2014 & 2015) so I worry most about her IR during this time of the year. I could take her off the Equioxx (I know the group does not recommend NSAIDS) but if there's a way to keep her on it, I'd like to. I'm wondering if the benefit is worth the risk. 
--
Kelly & Micah, Clayton NC

April 2016

Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kelly%20and%20%20Micah 

Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1829  .

 

 

          

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