Date   

Re: Sleep deprivation, depression, decreased appetite...PPID related?

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I suspect you're right that the sleep deprivation is the central issue here. Something is making her uneasy. It could just be the new barn, or combination of new barn and maybe visual problems if her pituitary is pressing on the optic chiasm. The easiest thing to try would be switching stalls. If that doesn't work, her retinas should be examined for edema.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Re: Latest blood analysis for donkey

Jennifer Murphy
 

Hi Carrie!  Does Lillie seem more comfortable, too?  I'm glad to hear things are getting better. 

--
Jennifer in NH
2020

CH - https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jennifer%20and%20Flea

Photo album - https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=251041&p=Name,,,20,1,0,0


Sleep deprivation, depression, decreased appetite...PPID related?

Stepht
 

The barn manager told me this morning that Katie hasn't been laying down in her stall or out in the paddock to sleep. This afternoon I checked on her and saw her collapsing as she dozed in her stall, so I strongly suspect she is suffering with sleep deprivation.  I forgot to ask when it was first noticed that she wasn't laying down, but I do not recall brushing shavings off of her in the last few months.

I have had a quick peek around her stall and I don't notice anything that would be bothering her. The horse that is next to her is her paddock mate and Katie is his boss.  I do not think it is pain related. Katie will get down and roll anytime there is plenty of mud and she generally will have muddy patches on both sides of her body.  The last time she came in from the paddock muddy was Friday.

We are boarding in a newish barn.  We moved 6 1/2 months ago from a barn where she was definitely laying down in the stall to sleep.  Most of the horses and most of the people are the same in the new barn.
 
The last two weeks, her appetite has decreased.  She also seems a little depressed.  She had one day last week that she spent weaving in her stall.  It was a rainy day, but no thunder or lightning.  Vet used hoof tester to check for laminitis, but Katie did not react.  She walks as usual, no pulses or heat,  and has not had a weaving incident since. 

Is there any information that links depression, decreased appetite, and sleep deprivation in combination being caused by PPID moving out of control?  Or could this be a thyroid issue? Are there any other health related issues I should be investigating?  Any non health issues?  I had her ACTH, insulin, glucose, leptin, and T4 drawn and will update CH with results when I get them back.

Thank you!


--
Stephanie Thomson August 2, 2016

 

Liberty, Missouri

Katie Case History

Katie Photo Album  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6072

Katie Lab Values Folder  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Stephanie%20and%20Katie 


Re: Invokana dose when horse leaving half feed

Lynn
 

Cass...
I've been following your journey with Cayuse. I'm afraid I have nothing of value to add but wanted to say how sorry I am that you both are battling this. I'm sure you are worn out physically and mentally.  Prayers and moral support!
--
Lynn
Beavercreek, Ohio
March 2018
Relevante Case History
Relevante Photo Album

Ω


Re: New member Napoleon, his history and help for future success

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Meghan,

Your hay should be tested using Equi-Analytical Trainer 603 which is done via Wet Chem.  Once you have the test results you can contact one of the people on our list of balancers (https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/6%20Diet%20Balancing/HAY%20BALANCING-1.pdf) for assistance with balancing the hay as needed.

Stabul-1 is easier to use as it does not need to be rinsed/soaked/rinsed like beet pulp, but again you would feed a minimal amount (just enough to get supplements in) and any amount would be considered as part of the overall 15.5lbs per day. The Stabul-1 treats are ok for an IR horse.

If you do source the timothy balance cubes please be aware that they are more calorie dense than hay and are fed at a 3:4 ratio for the hay they are replacing. 

You can retest 2- 3 weeks after starting a new diet to see if it's having the desired effect. 

As far as medication - as outlined in your welcome letter (Re: Napoleon Maintenance Program / Winter Laminitis (groups.io)) IR is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). As a group we have not found Insulin Wise, or Heiro, or any other supplement sold as a 'cure' for EMS to be very helpful.  If your horse has refractory insulin (insulin that does not go down no matter how tightly controlled the diet is) the only answer is medication.  The first medication to be used is Metformin.  There are some horses that Metformin will not work for, and some who it stops working for.  For those horses we have seen good results with Invokana but that is very much still under study at this point in time.  




Re: Sunny's boots

Sherry Morse
 

Susan, 

As already mentioned there's a very brisk business in used boots, which means you can buy and sell as needed.

Mary,

Once you have your horse's feet in the right condition you can stick with one boot size, but none of them last forever.




Re: Test results for Emmy

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Joy,

Other than an entry that states exactly what you put in your email your case history is missing.  Can you please update it with the actual case history file so we can see where (if anywhere) Emmy's diet can be tightened up.  If the diet is already as tight as can be and her ACTH has come down with her increase in pergolide she may be a candidate for metformin if her insulin is still elevated when you next retest.




Re: Desperately Seeking Timothy Balance Cubes in Vermont and Vicinity

Aurelio Henriques
 

The Timothy Balance cubes are moving steady out of our east warehouse that supplies these areas.
Demand for some reason is unprecedented but we have made changes at the plant to accommodate the demand.
Availability will continue to improve quickly.

Aurelio
Ontario Dehy
Goderich ON Canada

 
Aurelio Henriques
Ontario Dehy Inc.
On 05/11/2022 6:32 PM, Martha McSherry via groups.io wrote:

Thank you, Diane.  I hope it bodes well for us too!  This is the first time we’ve ever problems getting them.  I will have to stop recommending them to people west of Chicago.  JK!
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Re: Desperately Seeking Timothy Balance Cubes in Vermont and Vicinity

Marsha Cloutier
 

I got a bag at the Farmyard Store rt5 in Derby last week. They only keep a bag or two in stock as I am the only one that buys them. It did come this time in a plain poly bag with the lilac tag sewn to the bottom. 

Marsha in the NEK(Barton)
sorry replying from my phone so don’t have proper signature available 


Re: Diet for IR horse

a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 

Thanks for info.  Usually have vet give combo vaccine + rabies at annual spring visit when Apollo also gets teeth checked so he had tetanus last year.  You are right about rabies, I do it for me as well as him, since I frequently have my hands in his mouth. Of course, there has to be a break in your skin for you to get it.  Yes, cases are rare.  Although I haven't heard of any recently, know of 2 cases around here, one in a horse and another in a cow. Will do EEE/WEE and probably West Nile. Normally only vaccinated for those 5 things and he never had any problems. He's been having problems with very sore feet but no heat or increased pulses.  Slowly improving since recent diet change. Waiting to get ratio balancing results through Ucklele.  
--
Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo


Re: Sunny's boots

Jane Williams
 

They last longer if you can get away with taking them off infrequently. The velcro on the Soft Rides and the Clouds wear out with frequent on/off. Also if they fit poorly, the horses will chew on them, making it worse yet, or they fill with debris which is a problem. I find that its better to put them on and use duct tape over the velcro strap to keep debris from working its way in, and taking them off infrequently (I use a hoof powder inside) and that all together works wonders. We have now graduated back to the Cavallo Trek boots with the thin rubber liner, which makes me happy.
--
Jane Williams
2018
Prescott, AZ

Fay Case History
Fay Photo Album 


Re: New member Napoleon, his history and help for future success

Meghan de Bruijn
 

Thank you Sherry!

I will re-label those x-rays ASAP.

I feed between 1.5 & 2% of his body weight based on what we are doing or if he is losing weight. We still are in a fairly aggressive training program through the summer and fall. But I am all for weighing and setting it at 15.5 and see how it goes! We get our new hay in July. Please advise the best test for the hay so I can then have it balanced.

I can get both the STABUL-1 and Beet Pulp Shreds. Between the two, what would you recommend to carry the Custom Equine products, that is all I use the pellets for. I am trying to find Triple Crown Timothy Forage Balancer cubes but coming up short here in UT.

STABUL has treats, would they be good? They are guaranteed less than 10% starch/sugar.

Once I have him on this adjusted diet, how long should I wait to have him re-tested? Should I do it in July just before we get the new hay in? Or after we get the new hay in and have it tested.

Thanks so much!
--
Meghan B 2022
Park City, Utah

Napoleon Case History  Link:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Meghan%20and%20Napoleon

Napoleon Photo Link:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=274932

 


Re: ACTH test result interpretation question

a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 


I've wondered too if monitoring urine output could be helpful in managing pergolide dose for PPID.  I have one of those horse's with normal baseline ACTH but positive TRH stim test so I want to participate in Dr. Kellon's study.  Also wondering if frequent urination is significant.  Around time Apollo began showing mild foot soreness this winter, I noticed more wet bedding in his stall for awhile.  Then while he was waiting n his stall for farrier, he urinated 3x in less than 90 minutes which seemed odd.  Usually spends as much time outside as inside.  Doesn't drink a lot in his stall and has an automatic waterer outside so I can't monitor water intake there.  
--
Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo


Re: Invokana dose when horse leaving half feed

 

Thank you, Dr Kellon, because that's exactly what I thought -- how painful she is compared what the hooves look like. In response to my suggestions that Cayuse has abscesses on all four hooves, my vet said she believes it is Laminitis because of  pain in all four. I felt like I was missing something right in front of my face. I have laterals of the fronts in the photo album, not great, dusted white with foot powder. 

I'll ask about Tramadol. I won't be surprised to get an eye roll because of concerns about drug seeking clients. With banamine she is able to stand up more and shuffle around a tiny bit, go outside the stall to poop in her usual place, stand to enjoy the cool breeze blowing in her stall door, be more stable on her feet so I can doctor them. If movement helps mobilize abscesses, banamine is helping a bit. She's standing even in front now, so that's a change. I  have her booted in front with numotizine packed on her soles in plastic bags. RH hoof is warmer than the other three. After a dose of banamine, it was substantially cooler than yesterday. I'll try to poultice behind tonight.

I'll try to track estrus, but she's much of a displaying mare. I'm pretty clueless. I'll do some study to see if I figure it out.

She isn't normal, not by a mile, and if this is as good as it get's, it's not okay. 
--
Cass, Sonoma Co., CA 2012
ECIR Group Moderator
Cayuse and Diamond Case History Folder                
Cayuse Photos                Diamond Photos


Re: New member Napoleon, his history and help for future success

Meghan de Bruijn
 

Hi Martha!

Thanks so much for your swift reply! It has been quite a journey with this little pony. We found, over the past 3 laminitic instances, he was in full training over the winter months. His training was actually decreased when he went to Nevada. All his episodes have occurred in the months of Feb/March, and after doing his whole history, he has been this way since he was 7. Is Winter Laminitis something that should be handled any differently than a non-seasonal one?

We get our new first cut hay in July. I can have that tested and get any specific test that is recommended if Equi-Anylical can do it. Love to have some extra guidance on this. How do I go about "balancing" the hay? I'm not sure if Vermont Blend will do a custom mix or not, is there a source to go to for this as well?

We did a course of every drug we could throw at him when he crashed in 2021. We tapered him off of all drugs as he was recovering well and was not PPID. It seems as if the first test (2021) was done when he was on Prascend for 5 days. His current levels (2022 test) are much lower though and he has not been on pharmaceuticals since June/July of 2021. I would prefer to work with natural courses. Without tossing the whole kitchen sink at him, would a product such as Wiser Concepts InsulinWise be something to add to his current feed program to help lower his Insulin level?

I can knock off the treats..... It won't be pretty.... If there are any suggestions from the group of a good one to use, it would be much appreciated.

Totally agreed on x-rays. He is getting his pedicure next Friday and I have already sent them to the farrier. Vet said the same thing, toe needs to come back.

Sorry about the keystone link. All x-rays are in the photos as pictures.

Thanks so much for any ideas on how to keep this boy healthy and eventing!

--
Meghan B 2022
Park City, Utah

Napoleon Case History  Link:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Meghan%20and%20Napoleon

Napoleon Photo Link:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=274932

 


locked Re: My vet let me go as a client

Frances C
 

Dang! been a bad week or so in these messages, I'd like to add we can blame a lot of it on Covid. Urban/suburban horse people moving to rural. Vets are overwhelmed as it is not so easy for them to move. Small animal vets now charging city rates in rural areas, rural folks outraged. So what is going on with the poor people who are trying to raise cattle? Or for that matter human moms looking for formula? Female vets have a high rate of suicide so please be kind to them, treasure them and get them excited to be on your side. If they say "I dont know" that is actually a good response. Or thinking outside the box, taking a chance like "this will either be a cure or a kill" , going off label. They have high insurance rates and rascals are always looking for ways to sue them. Lawyers are part of the blame. But wait, there is more bad news - 2022 hay prices. Hah! now I feel better.
--
- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382


Re: Diet for IR horse

Frances C
 

Hi Karen, if it has been less than 3 years since he had a tetanus vaccination you could probably wait. On the rabies vaccine I think it is recommended  to prevent humans from getting the disease from the horse. It is a reportable disease and national figures show that quite rare in horses. Look at figures in your state for  others like EEE WEE etc. I sure dont want to overwhelm my animals with vaccinations they probably dont need if the chances are really small of accquiring the disease.
--
- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382


Re: Desperately Seeking Timothy Balance Cubes in Vermont and Vicinity

 

Thank you, Diane.  I hope it bodes well for us too!  This is the first time we’ve ever problems getting them.  I will have to stop recommending them to people west of Chicago.  JK!
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


locked Re: My vet let me go as a client

a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 

Just want to say, remember you are a good person and there's absolutely nothing wrong with trying to do what's best for your horse.  I don't think some of these vets realize that ECIR is a science/researched based group and Dr. Kellon is our Dr. Fauci for EMS/PPID.  There's that old saying that you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink".  I know it's easier said than done but don't waste your time and energy on someone who isn't going to help.  Always be kind but stand your ground.  Since our horses can't speak up for themselves, we have to be their advocates.  We decide how they live and even if they live.  It's a lot of responsibility to carry around.

I'm new to ECIR and surprised to see how pervasive this problem is. I didn't get fired by my vet but I couldn't even get a response to my request to do x-rays on a lame horse she had seen for years so I called another clinic and new vet came 3 hours after I called and it wasn't an emergency request. Definitely wish I had done it sooner.  It hasn't been all smooth sailing with new vet either since he's so very busy.  Unfortunately, there are not enough vets to meet the current demand and many large animal clinics can't find even new grads to hire because they don't want to work the long hours and be on-call nights and weekends. Clinic new vet works for actually sent out a letter to inform clients of this situation and asked that we all try to handle as much as we could on our own.  I've always been doing it that way anyway.

I got fired by a farrier. He didn't like me asking questions about treatment options for Apollo and resisted following ECIR trim frequency guidelines.  My "offense" was sending hoof pictures to owner of happyhoofpads (who also is a hoof trimmer) so she could help me choose most appropriate hoof pads. After reviewing photos, she sent a text with suggestions for trimming Apollo.  We forwarded this text to farrier and asked if any of these suggestions might be useful (exactly how we worded it) and his response was we should find someone else to trim Apollo. This was 3 days before Apollo's next trim and he had been trimming Apollo for last 8 years. Fortunately, I was able to find another farrier in time for Apollo's next trim after explaining what had happened. I still don't know why this guy said yes but I think having a vet he worked with helped.  Found out later from someone else that our previous farrier had a reputation for this kind of behavior.  New farrier came to see Apollo at 6 PM the night of a horse club meeting and still only charged his usual fee (I had offered to pay him extra since it was short notice).  

Maybe I was unusually lucky but I like to think there are more good people out there. 




--
Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo


Re: Supplement to help horse gain weight

Trisha DePietro
 

Hi H.  Dr. K and Sherry have already guided you on your question....What follows here is our welcome letter and it is chock full of information for you. You will read about the Protocol of Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise- and within in each topic you will find blue links that will take you deeper into a topic. After reading, you may have some more questions for us. 

Welcome to the group! 

The ECIR Group provides the best, most up to date information on Cushing's (PPID) and Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)/Insulin Resistance (IR). Please explore our website where you'll find tons of great information that will help you to quickly understand the main things you need to know to start helping your horse. Also open any of the links below (in blue font) for more information/instructions that will save you time.

Have you started your Case History? If you haven't done so yet, please join our case history sub-group. We appreciate you following the uploading instructions so your folder is properly set up with the documents inside. Go to this CH message with info on how to use various devices and forms. If you have any trouble, just post a message to let us know where you are stuck.

Orienting information, such as how the different ECIR sections relate to each other, message etiquettewhat goes where and many how-to pages are in the Wiki. There is also an FAQs on our website that will help answer the most common and important questions new members have. 

Below is a general summary of our DDT/E philosophy which is short for Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise.

 

DIAGNOSIS: There are two conditions dealt with here: Cushings (PPID) and Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)/Insulin Resistance (IR). These are two separate issues that share some overlapping symptoms. An equine may be either PPID or EMS/IR, neither or both. While increasing age is the greatest risk factor for developing PPID, IR can appear at any age and may have a genetic component. Blood work is used for diagnosis as well as monitoring the level of control of each.

PPID is diagnosed using the Endogenous ACTH test, while EMS/IR is diagnosed by testing non-fasting insulin and glucose.

The fat-derived hormone leptin is also usually abnormally elevated in insulin resistance but because there are many other things which can lower or increase leptin ECIR is not recommending routine testing for this hormone. Leptin is the hormone that says "stop eating".

In Europe, adiponectin is tested instead of leptin. Adiponectin helps regulate glucose and fat burning, and maintain insulin sensitivity. Low levels are associated with EMS. It has come to be preferred over leptin because it is not influenced by things like weight or exercise, and also because it was the only factor other than insulin levels that predicted laminitis risk

*Before calling your vet to draw blood for tests, we suggest saving time and wasted money by reading these details and then sharing them with your vet so that everyone is on the same page regarding correct testing and protocols.

*Please remember to request copies of the results of all the tests done rather than just relying on verbal information. Your vet should be able to email these to you. If you have previous test results, please include those as well. All should go in your CH, but if you are having any trouble with the CH, just post in the messages for now. 

Treatment: EMS is a metabolic type - not a disease - that is managed with a low sugar+starch diet and exercise (as able). The super-efficient easy keeper type breeds such as minis, ponies, Morgans, Arabs, Rockies are some of the classic examples. PPID is a progressive disease that is treated with the medication pergolide. Some, but not all, individuals may experience a temporary loss of appetite, lethargy and/or depression when first starting the medication. To avoid this "pergolide veil" (scroll down for side effects), we recommend weaning onto the drug slowly and the use of the product APF. The best long term results are seen when the ACTH is maintained in the middle of the normal range at all times, including during the annual seasonal rise. To accomplish this, the amount of medication may need to increase over time. Neither condition is ever "cured", only properly controlled for the remainder of the equine's life. If your partner is both PPID and IR then both medication and diet management will be needed. 

DIET: Almost all commercial feeds are not suitable - no matter what it says on the bag. Please see the International Safe Feeds List for the safest suggestions.

No hay is "safe" until proven so by chemical analysis. The diet that works for IR is:

  • low carb (less than 10% sugar+starch)
  • low fat (4% or less) 
  • mineral balanced  

We use grass hay, tested to be under 10% ESC + starch, with minerals added to balance the excesses and deficiencies in the hay, plus salt, and to replace the fragile ingredients that are lost when grass is cured into hay, we add ground flax seed and Vitamin E. This diet is crucial for an EMS/IR horse, but also supports the delicate immune system of a PPID horse. 

*Until you can get your hay tested and balanced we recommend that you soak your hay and use the emergency diet (scroll down for it).  The emergency diet is not intended for long term use, but addresses some of the most common major deficiencies. Testing your hay and getting the minerals balanced to its excesses and deficiencies is the best way to feed any equine (look under the Hay Balancing file if you want professional help balancing). If you absolutely cannot test your hay and balance the minerals to it, or would like to use a "stop gap" product until you get your hay balanced, here's a list of "acceptable" ration balancers

There is a lot of helpful information in the start here folder so it is important you read all the documents found there. The emergency diet involves soaking your untested hay for an hour in cold water or 30 minutes in hot water. This removes up to 30% of the sugar content, but no starch. Starch is worse than sugar since it converts 100% to glucose while sugar only converts 50%, so starch causes a bigger insulin spike. Make sure you dump the soaking water where the equine(s) can't get to it. 

What you don't feed on the EMS/IR diet is every bit as, if not more important than, what you do feed! No grass. No grain. No sugary treats, including apples and carrots. No brown/red salt blocks which contain iron (and sometimes molasses) which interferes with mineral balancing, so white salt blocks only. 

No products containing molasses. No bagged feeds with a combined sugar and starch of over 10% or starch over about 4%, or fat over about 4%. Unfortunately, even bagged feeds that say they are designed for IR and/or PPID equines are usually too high in sugar, starch and/or fat. It’s really important to know the actual analysis and not be fooled by a name that says it is suitable for EMS/IR individuals.

We do not recommend feeding alfalfa hay to EMS/IR equines as it makes many of them laminitic. Although it tends to be low in sugar, many times the starch is higher and does not soak out. Additionally, protein and calcium are quite high, which can contribute to sore footedness and make mineral balancing very difficult.

TRIM: A proper trim is toes backed and heels lowered so that the hoof capsule closely hugs and supports the internal structures of the foot. Though important for all equines, it's essential for IR and/or PPID equines to have a proper trim in place since they are at increased risk for laminitis. After any potential triggers are removed from the diet, and in PPID individuals, the ACTH is under control, the realigning trim is often the missing link in getting a laminitic equine comfortable. In general, laminitic hooves require more frequent trim adjustments to maintain the proper alignment so we recommend the use of padded boots rather than fixed appliances (i.e. shoes, clogs), at least during the initial phases of treatment.

Sometimes subclinical laminitis can be misdiagnosed as arthritis, navicular, or a host of other problems as the animal attempts to compensate for sore feet. 

You are encouraged to make an album and post hoof pictures and any radiographs you might have so we can to look to see if you have an optimal trim in place. Read this section of the wiki for how to get a hoof evaluation, what photos are needed, and how to get the best hoof shots and radiographs.

EXERCISEThe best IR buster there is, but only if the equine is comfortable and non-laminitic. An individual that has had laminitis needs 6-9 months of correct realigning trims before any serious exercise can begin. Once the equine is moving around comfortably at liberty, hand walking can begin in long straight lines with no tight turns. Do not force a laminitic individual to move, or allow its other companions to do so. It will begin to move once the pain begins to subside. Resting its fragile feet is needed for healing to take place so if the animal wants to lay down, do not encourage it to get up. Place feed and water where it can be reached easily without having to move any more than necessary. Be extremely careful about movement while using NSAIDs (bute, banamine, previcox, etc.) as it masks pain and encourages more movement than these fragile feet are actually able to withstand. Additionally, NSAIDs (and icing) do not work on metabolic laminitis and long term NSAID use interferes with healing. Therefore, we recommend tapering off NSAIDs after the first week or so of use. If after a week's time your equine's comfort level has not increased, then the cause of the laminitis has not been removed and keeping up the NSAIDs isn't the answer - you need to address the underlying cause.

 

There is lots more information in our files and archived messages and also on our website. It is a lot of information, so take some time to go over it and feel free to ask any questions. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don't worry, you will catch on, and we are always here to help you! Once you have your case history uploaded, we can help you help your equine partner even better.

For members outside North America, there are country specific folders in the files and many international lists in the wiki to help you find local resources.

If you have any technical difficulties, please let us know so we can help you. 

 

 


--
Trisha DePietro
Aug 2018
NH
Dolly and Hope's Case Histories
Dolly's Photos 
Hope's Photos 
Primary Responder

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