Date   

Re: hemolytic anemia treatment

palomino.1982@att.net <palomino.1982@...>
 

Hi Wallene,


Packed cell volume ( PCV ),is the measure of the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells ..also know as hematocrit...this is a blood test.

Have the blood drawn after a brisk walk.

Please keep us updated on their recovery.

Susan
EC Primary Response
San Diego 1.07
______________________________________________________________

Is the PCV the same as the test strip or does this mean to have blood drawn after the brisk trot.


Re: Purina Enhance Plus - worth a try for my Paso?

Kathy Brinkerhoff
 

Hi Tracy,


Is the product you are considering Purina Enrich Plus?


http://horse.purinamills.com/products/enrichplus/ECMD2-0032703.aspx


You should be able to find information in the archives on Enrich Plus.


Enrich Plus:  Starch 10%  I couldn't find a listing for ESC(Sugar).


TC Lite:  Starch 4.5% ESC 4.8%





Kathy Brinkerhoff


10/12 SE/WI





Purina Enhance Plus - worth a try for my Paso?

Tracy Dore
 

Hello all.  I've been on this group for several years and enjoy it.

My Paso gelding- Salsa -  is now 14 years old.  About 6 years ago my current vet agreed with me that he is IR.  He didn't test because the vet before him had already blown a chunk of my change, did wrong tests, wouldn't look at info from this group that I asked her about and said 'oh he'll just get Cushings later anyway - put a grazing muzzle on him or ride him more'.   She was fired.  Immediately.
Current vet was called in and he looked at my horse with his lumpy fat and cresty neck and said 'let me save you some money - manage him like he's IR b/c 99% chance he is".

Salsa has been on TC Lite pretty much ever since then. 
Last winter he got a little too thin (not deathly skinny - but his hips and top line looked scraggly). 
This summer he needed a bit more hay and I've needed to bump his TC Lite up some too - though he's still in range for what they say to feed based on his weight.
This summer his coat was very dull.  I added Chia seeds and that helped a lot.  It took some time to get his weight up from coming through winter a little too thin.

This horse stays on a dry lot when my grass is green - pretty much spring, summer and fall.  On the dry lot he is given bermuda hay which I weigh and have never needed to soak to reduce sugars. 
He does well on my dormant bermuda grass pasture in the winter - ie - no tender feet etc...doesn't 'poof up' weight wise.
In the winter I give him his TC Lite and hay as needed based on weather and his physical condition.

He has never foundered nor had colic.
I suspect that at 14 his body is just changing a bit.  He's still generally an easy keeper despite the weight issue from over last winter into summer.

Balancing my hay is not an option because I don't have room to store a year or so's worth of hay at a time.  Bummer.  Wish I could!
Vet was out in September and liked his condition, fine with my management of him and floated his teeth. 

I was wondering if perhaps a change is in order and the TC Lite - while great for so long - just isn't what he needs right now?
I tried to search for info on the Enhance Plus on this board...the new changes to yahoo groups made that an exercise in frustration.

Any thoughts on the Enhance Plus since my gelding doesn't seem to be 'overly' sensitive as far as IR horses go?
Any big red flags with the Enhance Plus?
He'd get maybe a pound of it a day.

Thanks in advance -

Tracy & Salsa
Summer 2008
South East US


Re: hemolytic anemia treatment

 

Thanks for the reply,

Is the PCV the same as the test strip or does this mean to have blood drawn after the brisk trot.

They were tested because we just realized they've been eating Red Maple leaves for the last week or two.  We had called the vet out because they haven't been eating well.

Wallene & Travis in NC Sept 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory6/files/Travis%20in%20NC

 



---In equinecushings@..., <drkellon@...> wrote:

With a mild anemia, I wouldn't immediately assume it is red maple - or even a true anemia if the  horses were at rest when sampled. If there is ongoing destruction from red maple. an easy test is to catch a urine sample and test it for hemoglobin. Test strips can be purchased at a drug store. With severe poisoning, the urine is discolored brown. If the horses have no symptoms (why were they tested?) repeat a PCV (aka hematocrit) after a few minutes of a brisk trot. If over 40%, there's no anemia.

Severely ill horses with red maple also have colic, often develop laminitis and 70% die. There is no treatment beyond supportive care for pain and fluids if not drinking well. Oral administration is better than IV to avoid dilution of the low red cell count. Otherwise, it will take time for cells to be replaced, up to 145 days for full recovery.

Never give supplemental iron to an IR horse unless iron deficiency is confirmed by low ferritin and transferrin saturation. Remember, there has never been a documented case of iron deficiency anemia in an adult horse. In addition to low iron indices, would see low MCV and low MCHC on blood count.

Eleanor in PA
www.drkellon.com
EC Co-owner
Feb 2001


Tis the Season Sale

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

All long and short courses on www.drkellon.com are on sale, 2 for the price of 1. You can take two of the same and gift one, or take any two for yourself. Courses may be taken at time of your choosing.

Eleanor in PA
www.drkellon.com
EC Co-owner
Feb 2001



Re: hemolytic anemia treatment

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

With a mild anemia, I wouldn't immediately assume it is red maple - or even a true anemia if the  horses were at rest when sampled. If there is ongoing destruction from red maple. an easy test is to catch a urine sample and test it for hemoglobin. Test strips can be purchased at a drug store. With severe poisoning, the urine is discolored brown. If the horses have no symptoms (why were they tested?) repeat a PCV (aka hematocrit) after a few minutes of a brisk trot. If over 40%, there's no anemia.

Severely ill horses with red maple also have colic, often develop laminitis and 70% die. There is no treatment beyond supportive care for pain and fluids if not drinking well. Oral administration is better than IV to avoid dilution of the low red cell count. Otherwise, it will take time for cells to be replaced, up to 145 days for full recovery.

Never give supplemental iron to an IR horse unless iron deficiency is confirmed by low ferritin and transferrin saturation. Remember, there has never been a documented case of iron deficiency anemia in an adult horse. In addition to low iron indices, would see low MCV and low MCHC on blood count.

Eleanor in PA
www.drkellon.com
EC Co-owner
Feb 2001


Cushing's Senior Diet for Kelly UK

applepiptoo@...
 

Hi everyone,

This is my first post. Kelly's ACTH blood test came back as 201 on Monday (15/11/13), today I have given her her first 1/4 tablet (so 0.25mg) of Prascend.

Kelly's case history is here: http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory8/files/Philippa%20Yorkshire%20UK

My main concern right now is what to feed her. We think she may be 34 and her teeth are wearing out, although I give her a couple of kilos of haylage to pick at overnight most of it just ends up on the floor.

Up to now she has been eating about 3kg of grass nuts and the same of lucerne/alfalfa nuts (both from Simple Systems), plus 500g of copra. All soaked but provided separately for variation. I have also been giving her a mugful of oats, freshly ground, with the copra and a tablespoon of salt.

For vits/mins/plus weight gain she was on 750g of Thunderbrook base mix, however following the diagnosis I am in the process of changing her over to 500g of MetaSlim and 500g TopNosh (again both from Simple Systems).

Touch wood she has never had laminitis (she's been at the yard since she was 10) and she doesn't have any odd fat deposits, so I think she may not be IR - I will talk to my vet about testing for this.

I found the senior diet posted in the files section but think it might be a bit too complex to leave with the livery yard when I have to travel with work. I am also a little concerned about the sugar beet as I have previously fed this (as Dengie AlfaBeet) and she didn't seem to do that well on it. Indeed at the moment her digestion seems to be the best it's been for years!

Any thoughts appreciated.

Thanks,

Philippa
Yorkshire UK
Joined Nov 2013


MESSAGE POSTING ETIQUETTE - KEEPING ECIR USER FRIENDLY

ThePitchforkPrincess@...
 

This is a high volume list that can be difficult to follow. To help make this easier for everyone, please follow the guidelines below:

1) Sign your posts with your first name, location, the date you joined. When asking for advice, provide a link to your case history or photos. All this information is important.  It provides volunteers with the clues needed to get you quality responses, local support, vendors, vets, hoof care, etc. in a timely fashion.

2) Limit your signature to 3 or 4 lines.

3) Delete all but the part of the message you're replying to before posting.  Keep who is saying what clear by leaving the chevrons (>) in front of the text you are answering then type your response in a new paragraph below.

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6)  Feel free to take off-topic, horse-related discussions to our sister yahoo groups. ECHorsekeeping provides a place for discussion related to non- metabolic horses. Diagnosis, Diet, Trim and Exercise is the focus to allow members a place to discuss nutrition for non- PPID/IR horses. General horse keeping practices, lameness and other equine health issues that are not related to a PPID/IR horse, alternative therapies and equine related philosophical debates are also acceptable on ECHorsekeeping.

THE ECIR GROUPS:

ECHorsekeeping
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/ group/ECHorsekeeping/

ECHoof
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/ group/ECHoof/

For a complete list of our sister groups see the ECIR Files Table of Contents:
http://tinyurl.com/6lsvppq

***WARNING***
Solicitation is against list policy. If contacted privately by someone selling a product or service, be suspicious. These mails frequently target new members or those in a crisis. Often the product or service will not hold up to close examination. It could be harmless but also could be unsafe. Any suggested supplement, treatment, hoof care approach, etc, should be posted on the list so that everyone can benefit from list feedback. If you receive an e-mail selling something, either post to the group to ask about it, or forward the mail to

EquineCushings-owner@ yahoogroups.com
******************************

PROTECTING YOUR PRIVACY
Yahoo uses "Web Beacons" similar to cookies to track Yahoo Group users. If you do not wish to be tracked, go here:
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About half-way down the page, in the section "Outside the Yahoo! Network", is a little "Click Here" link that will let you "opt-out" of their new method of snooping.

Once you have clicked that link, you are opted out. Notice the "Success" message the top the next page. Do not hit "Cancel Opt-out" button which will *undo* the opt-out.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Owners, Moderators & Primary Response Teams of the Equine Cushings Lists


MESSAGE POSTING ETIQUETTE - KEEPING ECIR USER FRIENDLY

ThePitchforkPrincess@...
 

This is a high volume list that can be difficult to follow.  Help make it easier for everyone by following the guidelines below:

1) Sign your posts with your first name, location, the date you joined. When asking for advice, provide a link to your case history or photos. All this information is important.  It provides volunteers with the clues needed to get you quality responses, local support, vendors, vets, hoof care, etc. in a timely fashion. Limit your signature to 3 or 4 lines.

2) Delete all but the part of the message you're replying to before posting.  Keep who is saying what clear by leaving the chevrons (>) in front of the text you are answering then type your response in a new paragraph below.  Neo users, click on the picture of the three dots (located in the lower right corner of the reply box) and erase the text that appears below it.

3) Change the subject line when threads take off in new directions indicate the topic . For example: NOW: New Subject (was Old Subject).

4) Don't re-post messages if they don't immediately appear on the group or go unanswered. Be patient, it is not personal or a reflection on you in any way.  Allow roughly 48 hours before re-posting with the words "2nd Post" in the subject line and simply provide the original message's number and remember with so many posts some do get missed.

5)  Off-topic but horse-related discussions: our sister group ECHorsekeeping provides a place to discuss issues involving  non-metabolic horses, general horse keeping practices, lameness and other equine health issues,  alternative therapies and equine related philosophical debates. 

THE ECIR GROUPS:

ECHorsekeeping
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/ group/ECHorsekeeping/

ECHoof
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/ group/ECHoof/

For a complete list of our sister groups see the ECIR Files Table of Contents:
http://tinyurl.com/6lsvppq


***WARNING***

Solicitation is against list policy. If contacted privately by someone selling a product or service, be suspicious. These mails frequently target new members or those in a crisis. Often the product or service will not hold up to close examination. It could be harmless but also could be unsafe. Any suggested supplement, treatment, hoof care approach, etc, should be posted on the list so that everyone can benefit from list feedback. If you receive an e-mail selling something, either post to the group to ask about it, or forward the mail to EquineCushings-owner@ yahoogroups.com


PROTECTING YOUR PRIVACY
Yahoo uses "Web Beacons" similar to cookies to track Yahoo Group users. If you do not wish to be tracked, go here:
http://privacy.yahoo.com/ privacy/us/beacons/details. html

About half-way down the page, in the section "Outside the Yahoo! Network", is a little "Click Here" link that will let you "opt-out" of their new method of snooping.

Once you have clicked that link, you are opted out. Notice the "Success" message the top the next page. Do not hit "Cancel Opt-out" button which will *undo* the opt-out.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Owners, Moderators & Primary Response Teams of the Equine Cushings Lists


Pergolide shelf life

Catherine G. Fischer
 

After the mistakes of ordering too much at once and then not storing it properly, we are gun shy! Capsules are from Thriving Pets.
We have some to either use or dispose.  It is stored in the refrig door shelf in paper bag.  Should we use it 10 days beyond 30 days?  Or should we dispose of anything over 30 days?  
At this time, she is doing so much better with close to right dose and proper storage.

Thank you all.

Catherine
Idaho 2010

http://groups. yahoo.com/ neo/groups/ echistory7/ files/Cindy% 20ID  


Re: Abscess vs Laminitis

Catherine G. Fischer
 

.Hi Lavnia, Nancy, and Kathleen,

Thank you for help so far.  This morning foot photos and radiographs are posted in photo album. 

Please when you can take a look at radiographs July through September

Are we on the right track?  Advice?

Foot pics are November. 

I am helping Cindy.  Our horses live together and are BFFs...

I think we are no longer considering possible abscess.  Melada is hugely improved.  One huge factor for her was pergolide storage & dose.


Catherine

Idaho 2010


http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory7/photos/albums/53259580


http://groups. yahoo.com/ neo/groups/ echistory7/ files/Cindy% 20ID  




---In EquineCushings@..., <dnlf@...> wrote:

Hi Catherine,

  Found the xrays. Were these taken before or after the corrective trimming was implemented? From these xrays, the soles are really thin, esp under the tip of the coffin bone. This would certainly account for the soreness Melada is feeling.


  New, current pics would be really helpful for us to help you make sure the trim is going in the right direction.


Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team

---In EquineCushings@..., <equinecushings@...> wrote:

Cindy,


You said, "She's been trimmed every three weeks bringing toe back and raising heel. " Did you mean to say LOWERING the heel?


We should get this clarified before making recommendations. 


Kathleen (KFG in KCMO)

Director, ECIR, Inc.

Missouri - Dec 2005

 


Re: Abscess vs Laminitis

Catherine G. Fischer
 

Nancy,  

Finally!  Pics of Melada have been posted in photo album..  First I put them in the document file--then re-posted them to photos.....  eeks..  I am improving although not at rocket speed..  Will you delete the radiographs you helped us post in Cindy's document file?   As all are now in the photo album.


Thanks.. 


Catherine

Idaho 2010


http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory7/photos/albums/53259580



http://groups. yahoo.com/ neo/groups/ echistory7/ files/Cindy% 20ID





---In EquineCushings@..., <threecatfarm@...> wrote:

PS>>Catherine and Cindy - going to ask one BIG FAVOR when you upload pics.

Please go to the ECHistory7 PHOTOS section.  :-)

Loading photos there makes viewing 10000X easier for the volunteers than if you put them in your regular document folder.

Here's the link to the photos section

http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHistory7/photos/albums

Look to the right hand corner for  purple button that says NEW ALBUM.  Follow instructions from there.


Did I say I promise it gets easier?

 Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003

Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.

www.ECIRhorse.org

Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup




Re: Pergolide problem

hiestand08@...
 

Wow I am impressed, been in many times trying to find the poor old guy.  Thanks so much

Tish,

Pepper

2003

Benson, AZ



---In EquineCushings@..., <threecatfarm@...> wrote:

Hi Tish


Here's a link that may work to Pepper's CH


http://wayback.archive.org/web/20100124042945/http://www.sportshorses.com/cases/Mooshkala.Pepper.htm


You joined in September 2003.



Nancy C in NH

ECIR Group Moderator

Febriuary 2003







Re: hemolytic anemia treatment

 

Thanks Patty,

We moved them to a different barn last night.  They can stay a few days, until we can get rid of the trees.


They've been on a balanced diet for a year or so now, so that's covered.


I think they've been eating the leaves for a week or longer.  As of last night they were still moving around normally, just not eating right.


My concern is that they will be locked in stalls the whole time, how will I know that they are lethargic or worse?  We'll go over as soon as my daughter is out of school to walk them.


The worst part is, it's a kind of rehab barn and the lady thinks she knows everything and thinks she's helping by giving the Red cell and some kind of pellet that she thinks is good for them!


I'm just sick about all of it :(.


Wallene & Travis in NC Sept 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory6/files/Travis%20in%20NC



---In EquineCushings@..., <DesertHorses@...> wrote:

Hi Wallene ~


The treatment for acute toxic hemolytic anemia is fluid and blood transfusion, antioxidants, and to remove the cause (including administering charcoal if the ingestion is current).  Although some heme may be conjugated to bilirubin, the horse isn't losing iron, the red blood cells are "lysed" or damaged - and giving iron isn't going to fix that.


http://www.ivis.org/advances/knight2/acer/chapter.asp?LA=1

http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/sive/2010/english/11.pdf 

(If you can't open these, join IVIS - it's free - and you can print these for your vet.)


If your horses seem comfortably active, the primary action right now would be to mineral balance their diet and ensure they are getting quality forage with adequate Omega-3 (flax - 3 oz), vitamin E (at least 1,000 IU per 500 lbs body weight) and vitamin A (at NRC level for their weight) and salt.  


As the second article mentions, hematocrit may decline several days after ingestion of the toxin (2-5 days), so if you're within the five day time frame and they appear to worsen (lethargy) you may want to consider a clinic where they can have blood gas levels checked and be transfused if necessary.  If you're past that time frame and they're doing OK, good diet and avoiding strenuous activity (that increases oxygen demand) should allow them to rebound.


I'm sure Dr. Kellon has other considerations to suggest, but avoid the added iron - simply counterproductive.

Also try to get copies of the blood test results.


Patti Woodbury Kuvik

Vail AZ 2001



---In equinecushings@..., <wallenereimer@...> wrote:

Dr. Kellon?  We recently moved and it turns out we have Red Maple very close to our paddocks.  Now two of the horses tested positive for mild anemia.  The vet wants to treat with Red Cell which I know if not recommended for IR horses. 

I had to take all four to another barn to get them out of here since I have no way to put them up here.  The lady at this barn cares for lots of sick and pregnant horses and I was able to convince them NOT to give my IR guy Red Cell, but she AND the vet are insisting.  Please, is this OK, any other options or recommendations?

I'm finally just getting Travis so he can be ridden again and now this.

Wallene & Travis in NC Sept 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory6/files/Travis%20in%20NC


Re: Depressed horse

Carol
 

Well, there's your answer, she doesn't like being locked up..........
 
Carol and Rossi in Maryland 2003


On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 6:26 AM, <nicholaduncan@...> wrote:
 I wonder what is making her not want to eat - she will eat from her feed bucket out in the field, but once in the stable, she is just not interested.  Not even in her hay.   
So it's beyond the veil, but seems a deeper issue in this horse.  She is happy to go out to the field, and strides along no problem at all.
 
They are a puzzle!
 
Nicki
member since Nov 2013
 


Re: Depressed horse

nicholaduncan@...
 

 


Re: hemolytic anemia treatment

 

Hi Wallene ~


The treatment for acute toxic hemolytic anemia is fluid and blood transfusion, antioxidants, and to remove the cause (including administering charcoal if the ingestion is current).  Although some heme may be conjugated to bilirubin, the horse isn't losing iron, the red blood cells are "lysed" or damaged - and giving iron isn't going to fix that.


http://www.ivis.org/advances/knight2/acer/chapter.asp?LA=1

http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/sive/2010/english/11.pdf 

(If you can't open these, join IVIS - it's free - and you can print these for your vet.)


If your horses seem comfortably active, the primary action right now would be to mineral balance their diet and ensure they are getting quality forage with adequate Omega-3 (flax - 3 oz), vitamin E (at least 1,000 IU per 500 lbs body weight) and vitamin A (at NRC level for their weight) and salt.  


As the second article mentions, hematocrit may decline several days after ingestion of the toxin (2-5 days), so if you're within the five day time frame and they appear to worsen (lethargy) you may want to consider a clinic where they can have blood gas levels checked and be transfused if necessary.  If you're past that time frame and they're doing OK, good diet and avoiding strenuous activity (that increases oxygen demand) should allow them to rebound.


I'm sure Dr. Kellon has other considerations to suggest, but avoid the added iron - simply counterproductive.

Also try to get copies of the blood test results.


Patti Woodbury Kuvik

Vail AZ 2001



---In equinecushings@..., <wallenereimer@...> wrote:

Dr. Kellon?  We recently moved and it turns out we have Red Maple very close to our paddocks.  Now two of the horses tested positive for mild anemia.  The vet wants to treat with Red Cell which I know if not recommended for IR horses. 

I had to take all four to another barn to get them out of here since I have no way to put them up here.  The lady at this barn cares for lots of sick and pregnant horses and I was able to convince them NOT to give my IR guy Red Cell, but she AND the vet are insisting.  Please, is this OK, any other options or recommendations?

I'm finally just getting Travis so he can be ridden again and now this.

Wallene & Travis in NC Sept 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory6/files/Travis%20in%20NC


hemolytic anemia treatment

 

Dr. Kellon?  We recently moved and it turns out we have Red Maple very close to our paddocks.  Now two of the horses tested positive for mild anemia.  The vet wants to treat with Red Cell which I know if not recommended for IR horses. 

I had to take all four to another barn to get them out of here since I have no way to put them up here.  The lady at this barn cares for lots of sick and pregnant horses and I was able to convince them NOT to give my IR guy Red Cell, but she AND the vet are insisting.  Please, is this OK, any other options or recommendations?

I'm finally just getting Travis so he can be ridden again and now this.

Wallene & Travis in NC Sept 2012
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory6/files/Travis%20in%20NC


Re: Tori Hoof Photos - Advice Requested & Update

PapBallou@...
 

 



---In EquineCushings@..., <jackieadecker@...> wrote:

Linda:


Yikes, Tori was even more tender footed this morning than she was yesterday.  Moving around her paddock, but gingerly, rather than striding out.  So much so that I didn't ride her at all today.  I am afraid I might have taken too much off the heels?



________________________________


Jackie -


I have to ask you why you are riding her?  Her feet are nowhere near balanced since her founder in the spring.  I would expect many horses would not be at their best with the form she has, regardless of past history of founder.


This is absolutely not a situation where "ride her through it" is appropriate should someone be suggesting that, or even contemplate suggesting that to you.  I know there are some out there who think movement is key and make the horse work.  Wrong.  Movement is key, but only if she can do so.  


Until you get the feet correctly balanced, you should not even consider riding her IMO.  I'm confused that the farrier doesn't see the corrections that need to be made.  Frankly, there doesn't seem to be much change since when we first met Tori.


Linda

EC Primary Response

W


Re: Tori Hoof Photos - Advice Requested & Update

 

Linda:


Yikes, Tori was even more tender footed this morning than she was yesterday.  Moving around her paddock, but gingerly, rather than striding out.  So much so that I didn't ride her at all today.  I am afraid I might have taken too much off the heels? I hate seeing her sore again.  I know it isn't her diet because she isn't getting any pasture, even with the bottom hole duct taped grazing muzzle on and the hay and supplements have not changed at all.  The nights are getting more chilly and damp but it isn't freezing yet.  Should I put socks on her front feet at night?  Starting at what temperature? What do we do when they get foot sore again?  Bute?   Put her back in Soft Rides for a couple of days?  Any help would be appreciated.


Jackie & Tori

June 9, 2013

White City, Oregon



---In EquineCushings@..., <jackieadecker@...> wrote:

Hi Linda:


My farrier has been coming out every 4 weeks since Tori foundered but I didn't think that was adequate so I have been doing twice weekly rasping of what seems to need it in between. They have actually been worried that I have trimmed too much, but I am hearing from you that I still haven't gotten the trim to where it needs to be.


I went out and worked on Tori's hooves again today based on your latest feedback and have posted the photos in the photos under echistory7 at http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/echistory7/photos/albums/11873534.  I did trim the bar and her heels, but the side view still looks like she has way too much heel even though the bottom view and back view don't look that way. One bottom view looks like I need to take off the sides as well as the heels although I swear I didn't see it when I was out working on her. I also worked a little on the flares, though again the back view looks like her entire hoof is slanted to one side. Argh!  This is hard. 


My farrier is coming out on Tuesday to trim the horses so if you could review and respond to my questions on the photos before Tuesday, I'll pass them on to someone who is more competent at this trimming business than I am. 


Tori was doing much better -actually sound on soft surfaces for most of the last month, but she was a bit hesitant again this morning.  Not sure why.  Perhaps it is the colder nights?  She only wanted to walk for the first 15 minutes I rode her today so that is what we did, but then seemed to loosen up, get a burst of energy and volunteered to trot on the sand surface of the arena and seemed better at the end of her half hour of exercise.


Thank you for your continued guidance on proper trim.  It amazes me that I see so much more in the photos than I do when I look at the hoof and that different views almost look like a completely different hoof.


Jackie & Tori

June 9, 2013

White City, Oregon



---In EquineCushings@..., <PapBallou@...> wrote:

 

Jackie -

Is someone helping you locally with the trim?  You definitely have been addressing that toe - looks much closer to where it needs to be.

The back of the foot still has heel height that is making her quite underrun.  If you can get that very redundant bar material out of there, you should see that the heels are too high.  Perhaps also take off some of that unexfoliated frog - it's degrading just a bit so the frog doesn't look all that healthy.  There's a much more healthy frog under all that.

Hope Tori is feeling better!

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004

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