Leaf eating - any issues for an IR horse?


calpiner <calpiner@...>
 

My dry lot is edged in trees - primarily big leaf maples. The leaves
have really started to fall, and my three horses are vacuuming them
up. I've noticed that Wizard (IR) in particular is moving much more
slowly, and he seems to be the most interested in leaf eating.

Are there any problems with letting them eat the falling leaves?

Thanks,
Carol, Mac, Abby and Wizard


mchambers333@...
 

i have a 1.5 acre dry lot that is thinned woods. A leaf blower did not do
very well. It seemed to me that the leaves would blow, maybe 3 feet out of my
way and it took a long time to clear a very small area. I was thinking of
purchasing a leaf vac (hopefully w/ a large bag). i would probably look
like a ghost buster out in the field though!
I have maples(not acer rubrum) 1 tulip, 1 sassafras and beech trees and old
pine trees..I did cut all the low tree branches so my horse could not munch
on them. Does anyone know which one has more sugar content ?

Michelle L. Chambers



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Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...>
 

Yes, they can be high in sugar. Muzzle him.

Eleanor


Harvest Moon <collieherd@...>
 

My dry lot is edged in trees - primarily big leaf maples. The leaves
have really started to fall, and my three horses are vacuuming them
up. I've noticed that Wizard (IR) in particular is moving much more
slowly, and he seems to be the most interested in leaf eating.


Carol, I purposely built my dry lot in the middle of everything so that there are not trees along the edge, because I know how big a problem falling leaves can be. But it hasn't completely stopped it -- on a windy day, some leaves do make it to the edge of the dry lot fence, and I swear that all it takes is ONE for Butterscotch to get heat in his feet again. Very aggravating!!!

--Shelley & Butterscotch (and Lacy, too)


Mandy Woods
 

Carol,
I know what you're going through. I have a huge tulip poplar and a sweet
gum tree that drops leaves on Asher's dry lot. I rake 3 or 4 times a day
this time of year because he likes to eat them. With the last 4 days of
rain and the leaves sticking to the ground I had to keep him in his stall at
night. This was the lesser of two evils. I don't want him eating them so I rake and rake. Maybe a
leaf blower would work better for you as your lot is probably bigger than
mine.
The answer to your question is 'yes'......it'll skew the diet and possibly
cause foot soreness due to increased sugars.
Mandy and Asher in soggy VA


Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...>
 

I haven't come across detailed comparisons between leaves, but any
leaf that still has color (other than brown) could be high sugar. The
process of dropping the leaves starts with formation of a plug between
the base of the leaf and the rest of the tree. Sugar production
continues in the leaves but it can't be pumped out into the tree. As
long as the leaf still has moisture, it can use CO2 from the air to
produce sugar. As moisture levels drop, it will begin to use it's
sugar just like curing hays do, so somewhere along the line the sugar
level will drop but how much remains in dried leaves I really don't
know.

Eleanor


Saucier Kathy
 

Carol,
I'm with everyone else on this. I recently had this experience. The persimmon leaves were falling and Magic LOVES them. That right there sends up flags but we noticed his urine output greatly increased and he just seemed a little slower.
Moved him to another dry lot away from the trees and it has gone back down to nice normal pee spots and he is perkier again too.
Kathy Saucier & Magic
Texas


Carol Alpiner <calpiner@...>
 

Thanks to all for the info. This morning I raked the
dry lot before turning the kids out. This afternoon
Wizard seemed to be moving more comfortably than he
was the last day or so.

I am always amazed at how little it takes to set him
back.

Again, thanks for the great advice!

Carol, Mac, Abby and Wizard

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J Amick
 

As Mandy pointed out there are additional sugars in those leaves. But
also you need toknow that certain trees are toxic to horses.
Red Maple (whose leaves are green, not burgandy) Cherry trees -
when the leaves are going into the wilting cycle. These 2 trees will
poison or possibly kill a horse if ingested. Look at this web site.

http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=3411
Judy-PA


calpiner wrote:

My dry lot is edged in trees - primarily big leaf maples. The leaves
have really started to fall, and my three horses are vacuuming them
up. I've noticed that Wizard (IR) in particular is moving much more
slowly, and he seems to be the most interested in leaf eating.

Are there any problems with letting them eat the falling leaves?

Thanks,
Carol, Mac, Abby and Wizard