What is the difference between coastal bermuda and say california bermuda hay?


cindfilou
 

I thought that the bermuda hay was lower in general, in NSC
content ,that most others. What is the difference between coastal
bermuda and california bermuda? I am new to this and trying to figure
this out. My horse has not been diagnosed with anything yet. It all
started when I adopted 2 preganat PMU mares. My Perch mare kept om
foundering but I also went throguh farriers trying to find one that
would not lame them up. She would founder on and off so I sent her to
live with my friend in the desert that has soft sand and not the hard
dirt we have here.She has been fine at my friends house but she feeds
different than I used to. After I sent her off I started having
problems with her son, but I also was still searching for a good
farrier. I started reading and found the IR thing. I changed his diet
and found a farrier who put pads and shoes on him. Now he is in front
shoes (no pads)only. The farrier said he will try and remove them to
see how he will do without the shoes. My horse has not gone lame
since I started with the new farrier and diet. I am afraid to change
his diet in case that fixed it or maybe it was the farrier. I know I
need him tested but until then. I feed about 9 pounds bermuda and 1
pound oat/alfalfa soaked 2x a day. I also feed beet pulp
(soaked/drained/soaked/drained). I have to use up the hay in the barn
as I do not have anywhere else to store hay and I cant afford to
throw the oat and alfalfa away. I am paying 13 a bale. He was also
very tender footed. All of this coincided with the diet change so I
need to have the blood work done to test him. He has been doing
really well. I am not sure if I have found a good farrier or a good
diet for him. Anyones advice/suggestions would be greatly
appreciated. Also just to let you all know I am a computer dummy and
will probably put messages etc.. where they dont belong. Just let me
know. I just wanted to explain my situation. Thanks.


Joan and Dazzle
 

Hi cindfilou,

Do you have a name that we can call you by? It helps us keep track
of who's who...

Welcome to the group. Boy, it sounds like you sure have your hands
full!

Our list philosophy is DDTEs - diagnosis, low sugar/starch/fat diet,
Trim, and Exercise if they're able.

To really know what's going on, it would be a good idea to test your
horse. You will want a glucose and insulin test from the same blood
draw. We have information in the files that you can print out for
your vet. There is special handling that the vet must be aware of.
Many people on the list have their testing done at Cornell.

It seems like you have a little sticking point on the diet. You
can't know the sugar and starch content of hay just by looking at
it. Bermuda grass can be low in ESC + starch, or not. There are many
things that can stress grass to make it raise it's sugars. Oat hay
frequently is higher in sugars, but again, you won't know until you
test. The hard part is that sometimes the sugar and starch is so
high, that you can't soak enough sugar out of it to make it safe.
The only way to know for sure is to have your hay tested. Many
extension offices have a hay corer that you can borrow. Many of us
on the list use Equi-Analytical for their testing. You would want
the Trainer #603. It's good that you are soaking the hay.

You may also want to increase the amount of r/s/r beet pulp in his
diet. That's really low in sugar and will help the overall sugar
number be lower.

As you know, good farrier care is critical. I'm sure the hoof gurus
will hop in to comment on it.

It sounds like you're on the right track. If I were in your shoes,
the first thing I'd do is test the hay. That way, you'll know
exactly what you're feeding and the risk involved. You will also be
able to see what the mineral imbalances are in the feed and if
that's causing you any problems either.

Glad you're here. I hope that you'll get a case history up when
they're working again.

Joan and Dazzle

--- In EquineCushings@..., "cindfilou" <cpowell2@...>
wrote:

I thought that the bermuda hay was lower in general, in NSC
content ,that most others. What is the difference between coastal
bermuda and california bermuda? I am new to this and trying to
figure
this out. My horse has not been diagnosed with anything yet.