Sleep deprivation, Was: Other matters


Sandra Su
 

At 1:38 PM +0000 1/11/08, Lynn wrote:
Do horses suffer ill-effects from sleep deprivation - in upright sleep and flat out sleep?
I recently read an article on this in a horse magazine -- Equus, I think. Horses were falling asleep on their feet, and owners were thinking it was some sort of neurological problem when a horse would suddenly stumble and fall. Actually, they found many of these horses weren't lying down and getting the deep, restful sleep they needed.
This is often caused by a horse having arthritis and being so stiff in the joints it's afraid to lie down. It can also be caused if a horse is nervous and insecure and feels that lying down makes it too vulnerable.
The article said once these horses were enabled to lie down and sleep, they recovered very quickly. Horses can sleep standing up, but they don't sleep as deeply and restfully as when they lie down, and if they don't get that deeper, restful sleep, they start collapsing -- falling asleep on their feet.
What does this have to do with Cushing's and IR?
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Lynn Williams <lynjwilliams@...>
 

Thanks for responding Eleanor and Sandy.

To answer your question Sandy about sleep deprivation - I am working
on something to do with crestiness in horses and, as questions pop
into my mind, who better to answer them than people on this site?

I will get back to the list when I have marshalled my thoughts into a
coherent form. This may take some time as I am a highly creative
thinker - in other words - I'm disorganised and easily distracted :)

I hope people will bear with me as I have posted another question to
do with feet which may also seem a bit off topic.

Cheers
Lynn

--- In EquineCushings@..., Sandra Su <ssu@...> wrote:

At 1:38 PM +0000 1/11/08, Lynn wrote:
Do horses suffer ill-effects from sleep deprivation - in upright
sleep and flat out sleep?
I recently read an article on this in a horse magazine -- Equus, I
think. Horses were falling asleep on their feet, and owners were
thinking it was some sort of neurological problem when a horse would
suddenly stumble and fall. Actually, they found many of these horses
weren't lying down and getting the deep, restful sleep they needed.
This is often caused by a horse having arthritis and being so
stiff in the joints it's afraid to lie down. It can also be caused if
a horse is nervous and insecure and feels that lying down makes it
too vulnerable.
The article said once these horses were enabled to lie down
and sleep, they recovered very quickly. Horses can sleep standing up,
but they don't sleep as deeply and restfully as when they lie down,
and if they don't get that deeper, restful sleep, they start
collapsing -- falling asleep on their feet.
What does this have to do with Cushing's and IR?
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


jtb14789 <jtb14789@...>
 

My Cushings/IR horse developed this sleep deprivation problem when he
contracted Lyme. The vet had no clue what was wrong with him. I came
across the Equus article & it answered a lot of questions I had.

Maybe not directly related to Cushings/IR, but we do seem to have a
significant number of members on the board who's horses subsequently
develop Lyme. Knowledge of a sleep deprivation problem which could
develop from Lyme arthritis could prevent needless testing for
EPM/other neurological issues & a quicker diagnosis of the true
problem.

Laura

--- In EquineCushings@..., Sandra Su <ssu@...> wrote:
I recently read an article on this in a horse magazine -- Equus, I
think. Horses were falling asleep on their feet, and owners were
thinking it was some sort of neurological problem when a horse
would
suddenly stumble and fall. Actually, they found many of these horses
weren't lying down and getting the deep, restful sleep they needed.
This is often caused by a horse having arthritis and being so stiff
in
the joints it's afraid to lie down. It can also be caused if a horse
is
nervous and insecure and feels that lying down makes it too
vunerable.
The article said once these horses were enabled to lie down and
sleep,
they recovered very quickly. Horses can sleep standing up, but they
don't sleep as deeply and restfully as when they lie down, and if
they
don't get that deeper, restful sleep, they start collapsing --
falling
asleep on their feet.
What does this have to do with Cushing's and IR?
Sandy Su
ssu@...


J Amick
 

Just recently I read an article about the outbreak of type 2 diabetes
in humans being in
astronomical numbers and this was brought on by sleep deprivation.
Well guess what?
Your reading a post from one! All along I've encouraged that the
lyme disease
was creating many other problems like the IR in our horses. Till the
day I die I will
say this, as I saw first hand what the lyme can do to push horses into
Cushings, IR and
iron overload, and most of these created laminitis.
I use sawdust and pine shavings in my stalls and I noted years ago of
who laid down flat out to get restful sleep, and who just stood up to
"sleep". The
shavings told the story.
Judy-Pa

jtb14789 wrote:

My Cushings/IR horse developed this sleep deprivation problem when he
contracted Lyme. The vet had no clue what was wrong with him. I came
across the Equus article & it answered a lot of questions I had.

Maybe not directly related to Cushings/IR, but we do seem to have a
significant number of members on the board who's horses subsequently
develop Lyme.





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Ute <ute@...>
 

This may be mostly due to a body's stress response. Constant stress
can cause chronically elevated glucose levels in the blood to support
a perceived fight or flight response that in our modern lives often
never comes. If it did, it would burn off the excess sugar there to
be utilized for energy. So the sugar excess remains and needs to be
dealt with by the body with the help of insulin. This may also be a
contributing factor of IR, along with a diet that is too high in
NSCs.

Sleep deprivation certainly increases stress levels in individuals
who will try to function as normally as possible during the day.

DR Thomas has written some very interesting articels on this subject
that were published in the Natural Horse and are available to read on
his website: http://www.forloveofthehorse.com/misslink.php

Ute


--- In EquineCushings@..., J Amick <happyday23@...> wrote:

Just recently I read an article about the outbreak of type 2
diabetes
in humans being in
astronomical numbers and this was brought on by sleep
deprivation.
Well guess what?
Your reading a post from one! All along I've encouraged that
the
lyme disease
was creating many other problems like the IR in our horses.
Till the
day I die I will
say this, as I saw first hand what the lyme can do to push horses
into
Cushings, IR and
iron overload, and most of these created laminitis.
I use sawdust and pine shavings in my stalls and I noted years
ago of
who laid down flat out to get restful sleep, and who just stood
up to
"sleep". The
shavings told the story.
Judy-Pa

jtb14789 wrote:

My Cushings/IR horse developed this sleep deprivation problem
when he
contracted Lyme. The vet had no clue what was wrong with him. I
came
across the Equus article & it answered a lot of questions I had.

Maybe not directly related to Cushings/IR, but we do seem to have
a
significant number of members on the board who's horses
subsequently
develop Lyme.





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