Penny's getting a cold


Sandra Su
 

Penny's coming down with a cold. Yesterday when I was at the barn, I noticed her coughing. At first, I thought it was from all the dust from grooming copious dried mud off her, but then one cough expelled a huge gob of snot from her nose. I'd like to take some measures against it getting worse, if possible. I know if she were a human, I'd give her extra vitamin C, but what to do for a horse?
At this point, Penny has a normal appetite and is bright and alert and seems to feel OK. But I'd like to keep it that way and ward off anything more serious.
Also, should I ride her or not in this kind of situation?
I do plan to go today and ride lightly because the farrier was there yesterday, and he put a rim snowball pad on the right fore, which has a regular shoe. The other fore (the clubfoot) has a bar shoe and a pad. The farrier wasn't happy putting on the rim pad, since he thought dirt getting under it might cause sole pressure and make her lame. So I want to test her out and be sure she's comfortable with it and call him back to remove it if it's bothering her as he suspected it might. I won't ride hard, but I do want to trot a little to see how the foot with the rim pad does at a trot.
I think snowball pads are necessary, even if we're knee-deep in mud right now, because it's going to get colder, and snow is predicted. With the last snows we had, snow was balling up in her feet.
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Wendy Golding
 

SandraSu –



We had a cold-type disease go through our gelding pasture (about 17 horses)
September to November. It would start with a cough then move on to
green/yellow mucus from the nose, and fevers. Start taking her temp before
you ride. They told us that if it was over 101°, then to call the vet. The
vet came out and gave antibiotic shots and left the owner with more shots to
give – I think it was about 7 total shots, but I might be wrong. Anyway, we
were all taking temps every day of all the geldings and everyone was
watching them closing. Of course we were “quarantined” to their pasture and
had to tack up away from the common staging area. Ended up only about 6 or
7 got sick. By the way, Penny’s temp will be higher after a ride. With our
recent Michigan temps going up and down, I noticed a few horses coughing
yesterday, but not excessively.



Wendy (& Rudy)



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Subject: [EquineCushings] Penny's getting a cold



Penny's coming down with a cold. Yesterday when I was at the barn, I
noticed her coughing.


5 Pine Ranch
 

Sandra, you need to take her temperature. Colds are rarely a problem unless they are off feed. However, I'd settle for some light longing (if no fever) to assess her soundness and skip the riding. I personally don't believe these horses need any antibiotics unless they stop eating and drinking or unless a significant fever persists.

Good luck!

Amberlee
www.fivepineranch.com
Please Visit Our Site!


Sandra Su
 

At 9:39 PM +0000 1/13/08, Wendy Golding& Amberlee answered my question.
Thanks. I will take her temp., which I was going to do the other day,
but having recently bought a digital thermometer and not knowing how
to use it, I got instructions from someone at the barn, and then it
got too busy. I want to do it at a time when Penny can stand quietly
in the cross ties.

Today I rode for a short time. She's sound, in spite of my farrier's
fears about the rim pad. She coughed a little when I started
trotting, but it didn't seem even as bad as yesterday when the
farrier was here and she was merely standing in the cross ties. Also,
there was only a small amount of mucus in her nostrils. I went easy
on her, only riding a short time and mostly at a walk. She took issue
with a corner of the ring where there were 2 blue barrels. The last
time she was there, there was only 1 blue barrel, so of course, the
addition of another barrel made that corner very suspicious. So we
walked in circles passing those fearsome barrels till they became
boring. Then we did it in the other direction. That was the bulk of
our ride.

It'll be quieter tomorrow in the middle of the day, being a weekday,
so that'll be the perfect time for temperature taking.

One more question: this thermometer doesn't have a place to attach a
string. The woman who helped me figure out how to operate it
suggested wrapping a small rubber band tightly around the end and
using that to attach a string. Would that be secure enough? Do I even
need one, since this thermometer is wedge-shaped, with the wide end
the part I hold? You can see I'm not used to this kind of
thermometer, having always used the old-fashioned kind that's a glass
tube with mercury.

Now, for all those laughing their heads off at my ineptitude, I admit
that I'm not mechanically inclined. So, take heart, newbies who have
never cored your hay yet. I mastered that, and if I can do it, you
can, too!

--

Sandy Su
ssu@...


Mandy Woods
 

Hey Sandy,
Jeffers sells sleeves for rectal palpations.....would you like me to find the order number for you? !!
You better try the rubberband/string idea or you'll be doing your first invasive procedure!
Glad Penny felt better today.
Mandy who is giggling....


5 Pine Ranch
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Sandra Su



One more question: this thermometer doesn't have a place to attach a
string. The woman who helped me figure out how to operate it
suggested wrapping a small rubber band tightly around the end and
using that to attach a string. Would that be secure enough? Do I even
need one, since this thermometer is wedge-shaped, with the wide end
the part I hold? You can see I'm not used to this kind of
thermometer, having always used the old-fashioned kind that's a glass
tube with mercury.

=================

LOL - okay, I did have some visuals after Mandy and her comments - so I must stop giggling & write seriously.

Honestly, I have been very lucky to have quiet horses for those that have needed a rectal temp done. I would suggest you have someone help you by standing at her head, do not tie her. Use some lubricant before inserting the thermometer. The great thing about digitals is they do not take nearly the time as the old fashioned kind and I always stand and hold the thermometer until it beeps. However, if you are more comfortable - by all means do the elastic and clip idea....but definitely have someone to help you with this procedure.

I have to tell you, we take care of our neighbours aged cat (14 years old) and on a recent visit to the vet with diagnosis of diabetes, the vet was quite stunned to tell me that this is the first cat in his 20+ years of practise to purr with a thermometer up his butt....lol - so you may get lucky :)

Do take a temperature though - it is the best way to assess the seriousness of the flu. Nothing that EC List will not help & support an owner with huh...LOL

Amberlee
.


Wendy Golding
 

Sandra Su-



Don't feel bad, I asked the exact same questions my first time. If Penny's
got a cold, it sounds like a minor one. That's exactly they way Rudy acted
during the epidemic - no fever, a little cough occasionally and just a
little mucus. Anyway, I did not tie a string to it. I just held on to it.
The digital ones have their own count down system. Stand to the side of her
rump and move the tail away from you. I put antibiotic lubricant gel on the
end of the meter and gentle pushed it in about 2 inches and just held it
there until the thing beeped that it was done. I read the meter and then
cleaned it with an antibiotic wipe and put it in it's little case until the
next use. Talk to her the whole time so she hears your voice. Good luck!



Wendy G.



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Subject: [EquineCushings] Re: Penny's getting a cold


Wendy Golding
 

Another thought - when I hold the meter in between thumb and finger, I tend
to put my other fingers against his butt as a kind of leverage against the
meter being sucked in. It was just a natural way to hold it.



Wendy



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Subject: Re: [EquineCushings] Re: Penny's getting a cold


Sandra Su
 

At 3:46 AM +0000 1/14/08, Amberlee wrote:
Honestly, I have been very lucky to have quiet
horses for those that have needed a rectal temp
done. I would suggest you have someone help you
by standing at her head, do not tie her.
I've taken Penny's temperature before,
and she's fine in the cross ties. She really
doesn't mind, and she stands very well in the
cross ties. How I do it is to cross tie her, then
when I insert the thermometer, I stay back there
and hold it till it's ready to come out. I've
done it before with the old-fashioned
thermometer, so the digital should be a piece of
cake.
My problem isn't how to take her
temperature, it's what to do with a new,
unfamiliar piece of equipment. I'm so
mechanically challenged, it's a wonder I can
drive a car. Sometimes I have trouble opening my
door with the key!

At 3:46 AM +0000 1/14/08, Rita Lockridge wrote:
It’s so small, a little lube (or spit) will be
plenty to get it in and you are off!
I use spit. It works just fine, it's
readily available, warm, it's free, and there's
less to handle than if I use a jar of vaseline or
whatever.

I usually don’t turn mine on until I’m in the
rectum, since it may take a reading too low
outside the body.
Thanks! Using a digital for the first
time, that's the kind of advice I need.
OK, I know this is off topic, so I won't post about it anymore.
--

Sandy Su
ssu@...