New member and proud owner of 29 yr old with cushings


Sandy
 

Hi, I just joined because I found this talk group. I don't know many people that have horses with cushings, and even so, they really don't have a way of treating it. I have a 29 mare whom I've had since she was 16 years old. My first horse when I was in middle school. She started showing signs of cushings around 20 yrs old. At the time my vet recommended not doing anything because it was not a bad enough. She just would have a woolly coat in the summer(I now body clip her 3 times through out spring/summer.) Around 25 yrs her weight became difficult to manage, at that point I switched her feed from Purina Senior to Triple Crown Senior(more costly)but it really made a difference. This year at the ripe age of 29, the triple crown starting to not work as well, neither is beet pulp or rice bran. She gets hay 24/7. I have a round bale of bermuda. Not sure what my next move should be. My vet thinks that she is better without cushings medication(bc of side effects) She always tells me that she is pretty good looking for her age and that like old people her skin is going to sag a little and she'll lose her muscle tone.. any suggestions would be appreciated here. I made an album of her, just look for "Prissy". The pictures were taken about 6 months ago. Right now she has lost little weight and her hip bones are more prominent, but I am hoping she'll get it back on the the spring- This is not unusual for her to lose some pounds in the winter.
Thanks
Sandy from Georgia


Linda Rollins <lindarollins38@...>
 

Hi Sandy,

Welcome to the group. Soon you will get to know the over 8,000 members here with Cushings /IR horses!
This is not your conventional "talk group" but more a dedicated group of horse owners with extensive experience with Cushigs /IR horse, and most importantly, Dr. Eleanor Kellon , co-owner of this list, is nationally recognized for her ongoing work with metabolically challenged horses.
We ask that you set aside some time to read the files that were sent to you when you joined. There is a ton of information in there, and probably answers to a lot of your questions!

This group's philosophy is DDTE .

1.Diagnosis - Diagnosis through blood work (ACTH, insulin and glucose) DO NOT DO THE DEX SUPPRESSION TEST. It can push these horses right over the edge.


2. Diet - Diet is through hay testing and balancing your hay with the minerals it is lacking. Testing also determines the sugar and starch content of your hay.a low sugar/starch grass hay based diet. You can't tell by looking at a hay if it is *poor quality*, *hot*, or low sugar/starch. You need to test. No green pasture. No grains. Once you know what you are feeding the horse by hay analysis, then you balance the diet with minerals specific to your horse and your hay. Bagged, pre-made products rarely fill the bill. Stop whatever supplements youa re giving until you know for sure what your hay is lacking.

3. Trim - a low heel, short toe trim. If the horse is laminitic , many find that barefoot in boots can make the horse much more comfortable than shod.

4. Exercise - if possible.

Please fill out a case history at our sister group, if you haven't already.We can get the big picture of what's going on with your horse and then help you to the best of our abilities.
http ://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory2

You will have to join but it takes no time to gain access. Then, when you post questions, include the link so it's easy to take a quick look.
We know these are stressful times, and we remind all new members to read thoroughly and breathe deeply. We are here to help.
Linda

Visit our new site:
http :// www . ecirhorse .com/
EC Primary Response
Linda in MA, Peanut in CT - 09.07


 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "Sandy" <sandysmithhorses@...>
wrote:
My vet thinks that she is better without cushings medication(bc of side
effects) She always tells me that she is pretty good looking for her age
and that like old people her skin is going to sag a little and she'll
lose her muscle tone.. any suggestions would be appreciated here.

Hi Sandy,

Regarding your vet and concerns about the side effects of pergolide - we
have many members who have been treating their Cushings horses with
pergolide for a number of years and the horses are doing very well. Yes,
there can be side effects but the most common ones are actually easily
controlled. Here is a document from the files called "Pergolide 101"
<http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/gF9rS4QxKrsCR0w5B9bnc281nhpUz_ZH80lHOzT5x-\;
sVSHVgyo-DEdsdg7gsn7uGIB2tC_mKZCk9GVi9s2s/Drugs%2C%20Pergolide%2C%20Cush&#92;
ings%20Disease%20Treatments/Pergolide%20101.doc> that I would
recommend you read - and perhaps print out for your vet to read also.

Let me know if you have problems with the link.

Barb in western CO
(with Sierra, Libby, Josie the donkey and Lola)
June 2005
EC List Support Team

www.ecirhorse.com


muff747
 

Hi, I am interested in reading the Pergolide 101 article but can't get the link to work.
What's the name of the file it is in?
Chris/Matty UK 07/09

--- In EquineCushings@..., "bmccray12000" <bmccray@...> wrote:


muff747
 

Ok, I found the file, thanks.
Chris?Matty UK 07/09

What's the name of the file it is in?
Chris/Matty UK 07/09

--- In EquineCushings@..., "bmccray12000" <bmccray@> wrote: