Question about Equi-Analytical lab tests


meg_findhorse
 

Looking at Equi-Analytical lab tests and that group says to use test #603. I'm curious why not use the other test that is cheaper?

I have been soaking hay by default, as never get enough volume to do all the mineral balancing. I'd like to be able to just stuff small opening hay nets ahead of time to make easier for feeding.

What I need is just to see if my last hay batch of bales from feed store needs soaking or not. How badly sugary is the hay? I have a pet sitter coming to care for my critters while on a trip. Neighbors have also volunteered to help. They could could toss pre-stuffed hay bags over fence in afternoon between the 2 pet sitter daily visits, if isn't too sugary. I feed my horses 3 - 4 times a day normally, but they won't get that while I'm away.

I keep asking around for hay that is known to be lower sugar. I'm also working to get fully on the Ohio Dehy Balanced Timothy Hay cubes. Working on making money for more cost of the bagged feed and also just switching them diet wise.

Test 601: Equi-Tech - combines high tech near infrared and plasma spectroscopy for a complete nutritional profile. By utilizing this progressive technology, lab efficiency is maximized enabling us to offer you a complete hay or pasture analysis at a reduced cost. Includes moisture, dry matter, digestible energy, crude protein, estimated lysine, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, lignin, Ethanol Soluble Carbohydrates (ESC), Water Soluble Carbohydrates (WSC), starch, non fiber carbohydrates (NFC), fat, ash, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, molybdenum.
Best use - best dollar value for frequent analysis of hay or pasture when a comprehensive profile is desired.
Price: $28.00

Test 603: Trainer - utilizes traditional analytical methods to determine protein, fiber, carbonhydrates and minerals. Includes moisture, dry matter, digestible energy, crude protein, estimated lysine, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, Ethanol Soluble Carbohydrates (ESC), Water Soluble Carbohydrates (WSC), starch, non fiber carbohydrates (NFC), calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, molybdenum.
Best Use- hays, pastures or grain where a fundamental overview of essential nutrients is required.
Price: $54.00

I know folks will say to just get the more expensive test because isn't worth it and not that much more, but if I have to do over and over and over for each new batch from feedstore then the cost differential will add up.

Is the #603 test that much better? Or is it just what has been used prior, so what works for all the prior calculation history and experience? They look by description to do same tests, but just by a different methodology.

Thanks,

Meg
north Texas
April 15, 2010 (2 Icelandic geldings)


Lorna <briars@...>
 

Hi Meg,

Looking at Equi-Analytical lab tests and that group says to use test #603. I'm curious why not use the other test that is cheaper?
The other test is NIR.

Here's a message from Sally,which is a good reason to use the wet chemistry,603 :

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/message/175919

Here's another message from Dr. Kellon:

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/EquineCushings/message/171056


Lorna in Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002
*See What Works in Equine Nutrition*
http://www.ecirhorse.com/images/stories/Success_Story_3_-Ollies_Story__updated.pdf


meg_findhorse
 

Thanks. Knowing to use keyword NIR also helps me be able to go through the archives.

Meg


lars_a_swe
 

--- In EquineCushings@..., "meg_findhorse" <meg_findhorse@...> wrote:

What I need is just to see if my last hay batch of bales from feed store needs soaking or not.
If you only are interested in sugar and starch values you can ask for a custom package. This will be $28 or choose the Carb Pack (644) for $30.

Lars
Sweden, July 2008


A
 

I, like you, am only able to get small batches of hay at a time, so I only test the Sugar/Starch levels. I use the Carb Pack ($30) now... was using the custom one but since it's only $2 difference with the price changes - *shrug*

If I know I'm going to have a big batch that will last (unusual) and is 'safe' I will call them and have the big test run.


I wanted to do NIR really badly when I first started down this road - but having the extreme variances pointed out and having Diego go laminitic because of small variances in his food I realize I really can't *afford* that chance anymore.

JMO

Angela & Diego (23yo IR/PPID)
Atlanta, GA 5/2011

--- In EquineCushings@..., "meg_findhorse" <meg_findhorse@...> wrote:

Looking at Equi-Analytical lab tests and that group says to use test #603. I'm curious why not use the other test that is cheaper?