Karen/Taz


PapBallou@...
 

I tried to answer to your post, but neo won't take me there.

Please post photos of the feet.  We need to see what they look like after the trim.  The x-rays aren't that bad so I'm a little confused as to why his reaction.  Often when a horse has laminitis, the worst of it may come after the owner recognizes something is wrong.  IOWs, it hadn't peaked, and sometimes that will still happen (continue downward) even when diet changes are in place, or medication as appropriate.  Then a plateau and healing.

Does he have boots/pads on?

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004  


Karen Maruszak
 

Here's what I am seeing.  He does not move around. If I leave the muzzle off he will graze and move about. The MINUTE I put that muzzle on, he's down.  His back legs are so weak from lack of exercise he can hardly stand. So which is the lesser of two evils? Grazing (limited and very short grass in this pasture) and up moving  or down 90% of the day? I am managing to get him up to at least eat his hay and drink. I had the farrier out on the 3rd.  She is one of the most well known in the Ocala area, especially treating laminitis/founder.  I can take pictures of his feet but do not know how to download but I can text them to somebody. Farrier looked at the boots and she did not like them, too high in the heel.  I got the soft ride with the torquoise/purple pads.  I know this is not what you guys believe but I HAVE to trust this farrier and my new vet.  I am so confused. BTW, we are scraping grass off of large portion of pasture today and fencing going up Monday for a dry lot. Maybe that will keep him up if he doesn't have to wear a muzzle.


Karen Maruszak
 


Sorry, forgot to sign post again.

Karen/Taz

Beverly Hills, FL

2/2014


Nancy C
 

Most of us shave the wedge off the purple pad or use flat pads.

Do not give him grass until you know his insulin is under control.  It was sky high in February.  Throw his hay around in various places so he has to move to eat.  Even small piles in a turn out can encourage movement.

His back legs are weak from having to compensate from the pain in the fores.  Do some muscle therapy on him, either yourself, or call a muscle therapist.

If he's not off the bute, taper off.  You can use Phyto Quench for pain instead.

http://equine.uckele.com/phyto-quench.html

Loading pictures is easy.  Take the pics of the feet as described at the link below, then go to the PHOTOS section of ECHisotry8 to load them.  It's just a few short clicks.
Here's how to take pics

http://www.all-natural-horse-care.com/good-hoof-photos.html

Here's where to post them
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHistory8/photos/albums
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003

Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.
www.ECIRhorse.org
Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup

Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/non-profit-group



---In EquineCushings@..., <karenmaruszak@...> wrote :

I had  Farrier looked at the boots and she did not like them, too high in the heel.  I got the soft ride with the torquoise/purple pads. 


Nancy C
 

PS...Meant also to say Karen GREAT NEWS about the dry track. That will really help once in place.

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003

Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.

www.ECIRhorse.org

Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup

Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group


http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/non-profit-group


Valletta Lochridge
 

> If he's not off the bute, taper off.  You can use Phyto Quench for pain instead.
First - Karen, sending thoughts of healing and support to you and Taz...........keep your spirits up - you're doing a good job for him.
 
Unsure as to whether to start a new thread..........Questions about PhytoQuench:  1) I see Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) and Grape Seed Extract.  So these are ok in these amounts for  IR horses?  2) Is there a benefit to giving this along with Mov-Ease for pain control?  3) How long can a horse be on the PhytoQuench for chronic pain?  (arthritis and navicular syndrome)
 
Valletta in CA
Jan 2012


PapBallou@...
 

Hi Karen -

We don't have the luxury of seeing your horse or assessing any of the things that may be causing him problems.  I understand your need to trust your team on the ground, and that is fine.  When you post something like "meltdown", we can't just sit back, but will get into high gear to help you as best as is possible.  We all take this seriously.  We all have been there, done that, and know exactly what you are going through, and probably more!  It's what keeps us wanting to keep you and all others and your horse(s) from going through some of what we have been through.  If you want assistance from us, we need to know exactly what is happening as far as D - diagnosis, D - diet, T- trim, E- exercise as able.

So please do follow the steps Nancy listed for uploading the photos into your photo album...

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004


Karen Maruszak
 


BTW, bute is down  to 1/4 g. and tomorrow morning will be the last dose.

Karen/Taz

Beverly Hills, FL

2/2014


Karen Maruszak
 


Thanks everybody. I took a bunch of pictures on my phone. But I don't know how to get from my phone. There must be a cable connection of something.  Yes, I did shave the wedge off the pads to make flatter. His legs just buckle out from under him.  Im just having a really bad day. Sorry.

Karen/Taz

Beverly Hills, FL

2/2014


Emily Phillips
 

Karen, Every day you get up and try to do your best for Taz he gets one day closer to being happy and well again. Try to keep going and let people here help. I learnt the hard way, and so did my mare, that sadly not all vets and not all barefoot trimmers / farriers know enough about laminitis to help Taz. The trim is really important and could explain his pain. My mare seemed like she was recovering really well 2 weeks after her acute episode but then I had her trimmed and she was crippled all over again. I was heartbroken. Turns out she had / has very thin soles and the trim would have whacked her straight on to them. No recommendation to have boots or soft ground. So she didn't lie down. Just stood in one spot in pain. So get pics of her feet from every angle and somehow get them on here so people can tell you what is going on. Xrays too tell so much, just make sure they are taken weight bearing for the whole picture. Give him a nice big soft bed to lie down on. And if he is lying down a lot it means he is in pain standing up. This way it takes the weight off the laminae and pedal bone and prevents more damage. No grass however short. You want to give him a few weeks to grow strong new laminae and stop the damage then you can reassess. The boots and flat pads will help him feel more comfortable on his feet, especially if he has thin soles or trim needs some work. And he will stand up and move about more when he feels comfortable to. Then you can handwalk him to give him more exercise and help blood flow to his feet. After over 3 months I am trying to find a new vet for my mare who knows enough to be of help or at least to support me in the tests I now need to do. And I am on to my 3rd trimmer. Hopefully found a good one. My mare told me she felt happier after her trim! Check the emergency diet stuff too. No point having him off grass then feeding him high sugar hay or other foods. Soak hay for an hour if you're not sure. So great you've found this forum now. We've all been where you are so feel your pain.. Keep asking questions.. Emily, Cheyenne, and Saxon Springmount, Victoria, Australia Jan 2014


Nancy C
 


Here's an article on how to move you pics from your cell to your desk top or laptop.
http://www.wikihow.com/Send-Pictures-from-Your-Cell-Phone-to-Your-Computer

Hang in  there.  it's hard to go through this but you have to be strong for Taz.  Lots of folks have gone through this before you and come out the other side so hang in.  IF you need some inspiration some of teh Success Stories might help.  I have two more to write - next week I hope.
http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/success-stories

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003

Learn the facts about IR, PPID, equine nutrition, exercise and the foot.

www.ECIRhorse.org

Check out the FACTS on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ECIRGroup

Support the ECIR Group Inc., the nonprofit arm of the ECIR Group
http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/non-profit-group


---In EquineCushings@..., <karenmaruszak@...> wrote :


Thanks everybody. I took a bunch of pictures on my phone. But I don't know how to get from my phone.


Pamela Bramell
 

Hi Karen and Taz!  I just wanted to throw in my experience as well.  Buttercup was laying on the ground for at least 12 hours a day for 18 months.  Yep, that's 1 year and 6 months laid out.  And she was on bute that whole time.  YIKES, I had no idea what I was doing to my pony.  Kept doing what vet/farrier said.  She wasn't getting any better.  Finally found this group and Butters is being ridden by my daughter now.  So here's what I see.  Taz cannot have any grass right now.  That was one of the things I was letting Buttercup do - graze for a few hours a day.  That was the time when she "felt fine enough to walk around"  hhhhmmmm.  Vet said that shouldn't be a problem.  Well, that combined with a lousy trim and about 4 lbs a day of not-so-safe choice feed and her name was mud.   I am not saying your trim is bad or that your vet doesn't know, but I am saying that any one thing can throw this whole healing process off.  I have a track (good for you for getting one) and I put about 20 piles of hay around.  My horses are moving all day long from one pile to the next.  I would also be willing to bet that your Taz is smart and knows that if he doesn't walk around you will come and take the muzzle off.  Like Butters all of a sudden felt well enough to get up and graze. These horses are so much smarter then I give them credit for some times.   So hang in there.  I will tell you that the one great thing I learned was to stand up for myself and my ponies (and horse) and be the one to make the final decisions on their care.  I don't rely 100% on what the vets or the farrier say anymore.  Okay, I am the farrier now, so I do rely 100% on the farrier :)    The protocol on this page works, it's tough to implement and learn, but it sure does pay off.  To see my daughter out there ground working and riding this invincible little pony has been worth everything I went through.  And there were days when Butters only shifted her weight on the front legs every 32 seconds instead of every 19 seconds.  We called those victory days at one time in our lives.  Yes, I stood there for several minutes counting how long between leg shifts.  Sounds a little crazy doesn't it?  But we are all good today.  So hang in, get the track up, get Taz off the grass.   It's not an easy journey, but the day you see your Taz back, it will all be worth it.  Don't forget it takes forever, I mean 8 to 12 months, for hooves to grow out.
Pam with Butters IR, Frosty Cushings,Story IR
in Va 12/10 
case histories are all lost in la la land have to find them


---In EquineCushings@..., <karenmaruszak@...> wrote :

Here's what I am seeing.  He does not move around. If I leave the muzzle off he will graze and move about. The MINUTE I put that muzzle on, he's down.  


Karen Maruszak
 


Thanks for the support Pam.  Taz is off grass completely and really has been except for a few minutes when I was curious if he felt good enough to move around.  He did.  Then I put the muzzle on and down he would go.  He is scary smart.  His back legs are very wobbly but I do see nice improvement in the movement of his front feet.  We cleared a dry lot today and the fence guy is coming Monday so then I can put him in there during the day and night.  He has been in the stall too much because I have grass everywhere, including around the barn.  Another good piece of news:  after 25 days, we are finally off bute.  YIPPEE.  So, one day at a time.  We had a good day today.

Karen/Taz

Beverly Hills, FL

2/2014