Laminar Wedge


kansteen5545@...
 

Hi Lavinia -
I have another question. Just in the past few weeks I have noticed a "laminar wedge" growing out on my mare's front feet. I do her trimming and I didn't notice it a month ago. It's a little less than 1/8"wide. She grew out a much wider one ( 1/2")about a year after she foundered in 2011.
Initially I thought that she must have had a laminar separation last year and it was now growing out - however, I am now wondering if this is from when she was having an attack of laminitis this spring. She was shifting her weight on her front feet - I iced her feet and put her on Bute for a few days - she was better, then not so good - back on Bute for a few more days and then was O.K. - but I'm wondering if she foundered some - I did not have x-rays done. (She was not sore last spring or summer and I was taking care of her myself, so I would have noticed.)
How soon does the wedge show up? Could it be from this spring? Also - she has been rampaging about because where she is now, as all the other horses go out to pasture and she has to stay behind. Could she have had some separation from pounding her hooves into the ground - so soon after she had laminitis?
Karen
Scarborough,ME
May 2014


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Karen,


Any of the scenarios you mention could potentially cause laminar separation. If the wall angle directly below the coronary band is steeper than the older wall below it, there has been a change in the relationship between the coffin bone and the hoof wall. If the trim doesn't take this into account by backing the breakover to coincide with the new angle of growth then a wedge forms.


Can't really comment more specifically without seeing some current pics to see exactly what you are seeing.


Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut

Jan 05, RI

EC Support

 




kansteen5545@...
 

Hi Lavinia -
No the wall angle just below the Coronary Band is not steeper - so I am thinking that this has been a more recent development. I have backed her toes up to almost the wedge as the trimmer did the year after she foundered.
The local feed store can send hay out to be analyzed so I can see if it needs to be soaked. And I'll talk to my vet about Pergolide.
Thanks for all your help!
Karen
Scarborough,ME
May 2014

---- "shilohmom@... [EquineCushings]" <EquineCushings@...> wrote:

Hi Karen,


Any of the scenarios you mention could potentially cause laminar separation. If the wall angle directly below the coronary band is steeper than the older wall below it, there has been a change in the relationship between the coffin bone and the hoof wall. If the trim doesn't take this into account by backing the breakover to coincide with the new angle of growth then a wedge forms.



Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Karen,


If there is wedge you need to back the toes thru the wedge in order to get the wall realigned with the coffin bone. Just allowing the toes to be too far in front of where they need to be will cause a wedge from mechanical forces acting over time.


Really encourage you to post pics of the current situation so we can see what is actually going on and can advise you appropriately. As they say "a picture is worth a thousand words".


Lavinia, Dante, George Too and Peanut

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team




kansteen5545@...
 

Hi Lavinia -
I can certainly do that - however, the trimmer I had when my mare was growing out the 1/2" wedge only backed up the toe to the edge of the wedge - said it would be more protection because if the wedge was cut into, it would make the wedge disintegrate,since it was softer material.
I know I need to get those pictures taken!
Karen
Scarborough,ME
May 2014



---- "shilohmom@... [EquineCushings]" <EquineCushings@...> wrote:

Hi Karen,


If there is wedge you need to back the toes thru the wedge in order to get the wall realigned with the coffin bone. Just allowing the toes to be too far in front of where they need to be will cause a wedge from mechanical forces acting over time.



Nancy C
 

I have dealt with lamina wedges off and on in my gelding for some 13 years now. 

Most of what people fear does not take place.  If protection is needed, boots provides that.

Really need pictures.

Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
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---In EquineCushings@..., <kansteen5545@...> wrote :

Hi Lavinia -
I can certainly do that - however, the trimmer I had when my mare was growing out the 1/2" wedge only backed up the toe to the edge of the wedge - said it would be more protection because if the wedge was cut into,

>


PapBallou@...
 




I can certainly do that - however, the trimmer I had when my mare was growing out the 1/2" wedge only backed up the toe to the edge of the wedge - said it would be more protection because if the wedge was cut into, it would make the wedge disintegrate,since it was softer material.

Karen -

Just for a moment consider the fact that the information your trimmer shared with you is not correct.  If anything, wedge material must go, and what can't be readily trimmed through must be kept open to air.  

Why?  It is the perfect set up for anaerobic bacteria to set up house keeping.  And since the wedge is comb-like in structure, with 'gaps' between the teeth of the comb that go right back to the lamina, the bacteria can invade the even darker, warmer, airless environment of the inner hoof capsule and then to the coffin bone.  This bone infection is called osteomyelitis, and it simply does not respond to antibiotics.  My little rehab that I took in has a similar problem where you can see on x-ray a direct channel to the CB.  I"m just keeping him going until he can't.

Depending on the environment, the wedge may or may not be soft.  It can often be as hard as, if not harder than hoof horn.

I'm looking forward to the photos you say you will post.  In all sincerity, it sounds as if there are form issues that may be of consequence, and we want to help, but can't just by reading words.  It's like me asking you if you like my new hair style - it's shorter than it used to be...should it be shorter?

Can't answer without at least a current photo of my hair.

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004