Topics

Haystack Feeds

Christine R
 

Has anyone used Haystack products?  I think they are only available in WA, OR, and CA.  What do you think? 




Haystack Farm and Feeds | Quality Feeds Manufactured in Culver Oregon



SPECIAL BLEND PELLETS


Feed as a forage supplement for all ages of horses and other livestock.  This feed is intended for horses or livestock that would benefit from a lower carb/higher fat diet.  There is no molasses added. It is useful for animals that need to gain weight.


THESE PELLETS WILL BE SOFTER AND MORE POWDER MIGHT BE PRESENT AS WE USE NO BINDERS EXCEPT STEAM!


GUARANTEED ANALYSIS:
CRUDE PROTEIN: MIN 12%
CRUDE FAT: MIN 6%
CRUDE FIBER: MAX 28%
DIETARY STARCH: MAX 5.0%
SIMPLE SUGARS (ESC): MAX 2.5%
WATER SOLUBLE CARBS (WSC): MAX 7.5%
FRUCTANS (WSC-ESC): MAX 2.5%
ASH: MAX 8%

INGREDIENTS:
PLAIN DRIED BEET PULP, SUN CURED TIMOTHY HAY, SUN CURED ALFALFA HAY,
GROUND FLAXSEED MEAL, RICE BRAN, CANOLA OIL


or...


Low Carb/Low Fat Horse Feed


INGREDIENTS:  dried beet pulp, timothy hay, alfalfa hay, rice bran, ground flaxseed meal


GUARANTEED ANALYSIS: 

crude protein-min 9%

crude fat-min 1.0%-max 3.5%;

crude fiber-max 28%

dietary starch-max 3.0%

water soluble carbs (WSC)-max 5.5%

simple sugars (ESC)-max 4.5%

fructans (WSC-ESC)-max 4.5%

ash-max <8.0%


FEEDING INSTRUCTIONS: For use with adding vitamin/mineral supplement feed 0.25 – 1.0 lbs daily. For use as a forage supplement consult your veterinarian.


Christine Rickert

Olympia, WA

2014

Lorna C.
 


>Has anyone used Haystack products? 


What's the situation,Christine ? Are you wanting to use one of these for your horse? Can we have a few more details ?Are you in a situation that you can't feed hay?


Sorry to answer your question with more question(s).



Lorna in Ontario,Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002
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Joan and Dazzle
 

I've used the Haystack Wildberry Treats for my little girls. I've tested them and they are under 10% esc+starch.

The girls just love these treats and they are quite affordable here.

I've not used any of their other products due to cost of shipping.

Joan and Dazzle

Anaheim Ca, 2006

Laurie Ball
 

I used their Low-Fat/Low-Carb for my 36YO Cushings boy, back when the Ontario balance cubes became unavailable here in OR. The Haystack Lo-Lo was the closest, cleanest substitution I could find.  I like that they use only steam to make it take its pellet shape. The pellets made it easy for him to eat, too, since he was losing teeth by then. I lost him soon after (due to a broken leg – *not* Cushings), so didn’t pursue what it would take to balance the nutrition of it. I still use it for my donkey and pony – it’s the dessert portion of their meals J I’ve never found there to be a supply shortage, and I’ve never found mold.  The harshest thing I could say is that it gets kinda powdery toward the bottom of the bag – and I’ll happily take it, since that’s due to the lack of binders.  So, from my experience, definitely worth pursuing, just as long as you can get the nutrition of it balanced correctly.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Laurie in OR (with grand old Skip still hovering nearby sometimes)

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

I need advice too.  I have been feeding Hay Stack Special Blend and soaked Alfalfa soaked pellets 2 times a day.  With this cold snap the soaked pellets are freezing.  My boy has few teeth is insulin resistant and has been recently diagnosed with Cushings, so he is still adjusting to the meds.  Is there a suggestion to substitute for the soaked pellets?

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

I just read that a joint supplement that has Glucosamine is not advised for horses with insulin resistance.  My supplement Su-per Sound Plus Powder from Gateway, has Glucosamine HCl - 5,000 mg.  What joint supplement does not have Glucosamine? 

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

I needed to add to my post:

 

Carolyn/Freckles

Eastern WA

2014

Stephanie Stout
 

The Haystack Feed Mill is very local to me, and I know the people that own it also. I have been feeding Haystack feeds(they make the Low Carb/Low Fat, the Special Blend(higher fat), Beet Pulp, Alfalfa Pellets, etc) and have always loved them. I don't feed any of their special blend grains to my IR/Cushings horse since they are alfalfa based and he can't have any alfalfa. But, I feed them to my other horses and use their BP all the time. I've never seen any mold, bad bags, etc but I do also get it right off the truck from the mill so it is very fresh so I'm lucky that way. They use their own home-grown hay for the feeds.

They are good feeds without the fillers that other feeds have. My horses love their products!
Stephanie
Oregon 
Oct 2014

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

Just wanted to ask why your horses can't have alfalfa.  I understand that Alfalfa is good for Cushings/IR horses. I live in WA and Special Blend is the new thing...and I have been relying on it as my main feed with the winter starting. There are few people around that really know what Hay Stack offers.  Local feed stores and Coastal Farm and Ranch buy most pelleted hays and cubes from Standlee.  Do you advise my calling Hay Stack to work out the best feed for my senior horses?


Carolyn with Freckles and Boomer

Eastern WA

2014   

PapBallou@...
 

Carolyn -

Alfalfa is the usual 'go-to' feed for the protein profile, which many PPID horses need.  However, alfalfa can have high levels of starch, which is converted 100% to glucose, which in turn may contribute to an increased insulin.  Many PPID horses have a secondary IR, driven by the PPID.  With these horses, one needs to be cautious because that insulin response may be the tipping point into laminitis.

And, alfalfa may simply be a trigger for laminitis in some horses that have an allergy to it.  I had a mare that couldn't eat it, period.

All that said, if an owner knows what their IR or PPID horse can tolerate, and you have a product that lists its starch guarantee (not just the word 'safe'), then feed what works for you.  My horses, including two IR and two PPID, all get alfalfa pellets as a means to balance the calcium for their diets.  I also use a low carb feed that is very similar the Haystack's product.

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004


---In EquineCushings@..., <carolynwahlfeld@...> wrote :

Just wanted to ask why your horses can't have alfalfa.  I understand that Alfalfa is good for Cushings

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

Linda,


What would I be looking for as a reaction to Alfalfa?  As an alternative, would Timothy pellets be OK.  Freckles is 40 and because of a swollen sheath, I had him checked with a blood test by my vet.  I also had his sheath cleaned by another vet who fond two lima bean sized beans.  Neither vet mentioned complications with Alfalfa and both saw the blood test results and reviewed his diet (ingredients on the Hay Stack special blend bag) and Alfalfa.  It is difficult to know what to do to co-ordinate vitamins, joint supplements, feed and hay pellets.


Your message was very helpful.


Thanks,


Carolyn with Freckles and Boomer

Oak Harbor, WA

2014

Stephanie Stout
 

Hi Carolyn,

My IR/PPID horse is extremely limited/not allowed any alfalfa(whether it is pure alfalfa pellets or a grain/supplement with alfalfa base) because he has very sensitive kidneys(he went through kidney failure in September) so the alfalfa is very hard for him to process. You could call Haystack, but I would say that you know your horse better than anyone with what he needs/can handle.

Stephanie
Oregon
Oct 2014

Christine R
 

Thank you for your feedback.  I tried searching through this group for answers, but I have a really hard time navigating this system.  It's extremely non-user friendly, but has a ton of info.  I would imagine it would be an extremely difficult and time consuming project to switch to a different format.


Lorna, to answer your question:


I am pretty sure that I have two Cushings (or pre-Cushings) horses.  I've been trying to feed as if they are until I could get the vet out (I have the vet coming out in about an hour to draw blood).  Both were really slow to shed out last spring, my gelding sweats excessively, has a pot belly, and my mare has lost a lot of weight and muscle tone since October.  I've owned my Morgan x Arab mare for about 12 years and she was always an extremely easy keeper (typical picture of an IR horse, but I didn't know that back then).  The past couple years I've had a hard time keeping weight on her through the winter.  This fall her drop in weight around October was very noticeable.  Neither have ever had laminitis or been lame at all since I've owned them. 


My 29 year old Arabian gelding's teeth are pretty much useless.  He gets the majority of his calories/nutrition from pelleted feeds and he's VERY picky.  I know he's not on an ideal diet if it turns out that he does have Cushings, but I have a really hard time finding foods that he can and will eat.  Right now, he's eating Safe Choice Special Care (which I would like to swap out for the Haystack pellets), alfalfa pellets, and Haystack chopped alfalfa.  He goes through about 1 flake of grass hay every couple days, but it's mostly to give him something to chew on.  Most of it falls out of his mouth.  When I've tried to take him off the chopped alfalfa (it has molasses in it), he quickly loses weight.


My 18 year old Morab mare is eating local grass hay supplemented with Standlee Timothy pellets, beet pulp, vitamin E, and APF supplement.  I just started adding these "extras" to the hay a couple weeks ago.  She also seems to do better (weight wise) on alfalfa, which I plan to switch back to soon depending on what the vet finds.  Last winter I fed straight alfalfa and she was fine.


If anyone has any last minute wisdom to impart before I leave to meet the vet in 30 minutes, I'm all "ears"!!!


Thanks,

Christine (and Avesta and Nellie)

Olympia, WA

2014

Maggie
 

>>If anyone has any last minute wisdom to impart before I leave to meet the vet in 30 minutes, I'm all "ears"!
 
Hi Christine,
 
Hurrying here in case you haven't left yet, so didn't read all the prior responses you've gotten.  If you haven't been advised to go to our website, I would go there and read through the diagnosis part.  The lab work requires special handling and the details are here: http://ecirhorse.org/index.php/ddt-overview/ddt-diagnosis  Print it out and take it with you--just in case you need to show it to your vet.
 
Maggie, Chancey and Spiral in VA
March 2011
EC Primary Response
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ECHistory4/files/maggie%20in%20virginia/


 

Carolyn Wahlfeld
 

I called Hay Stack today and the husband referred me to his wife who is a vet.  They have a feed store.  We talked about Hay Stack feeds and alfalfa vs. timothy and joint supplements.  I feel more relieved about Freckles diet.  Coast Farm and Ranch will order feeds.  I feel like I am making progress.  Some times it is necessary to work around vets - a vet can have a preconceived position.   

ferne fedeli
 

My Icelandic recently developed Laminitis after a 4.5 year break and the only thing I had changed was to give him some 30% alfalfa/70% grass hay, so it might have been the trigger.  I only gave him about a third of each hay bag full, so thought I was safe.  There was a little bit of green grass growing up around the fence line of his dry lot too from our recent rains.  It could have been either.  I immediately put him in his SoftRide boots and in solitary confinement for 3 weeks (pen and stall).  I walked him twice a day all around the barn paddock area too.  Now he and the donkey are in a smaller temporary paddock area that is a truly dry lot...  He is doing much better, thank goodness.
Ferne Fedeli
No. California
4/2010

On Sun, Nov 16, 2014 at 3:26 PM, PapBallou@... [EquineCushings] <EquineCushings@...> wrote:
 

Carolyn -


Alfalfa is the usual 'go-to' feed for the protein profile, which many PPID horses need.  However, alfalfa can have high levels of starch, which is converted 100% to glucose, which in turn may contribute to an increased insulin.  Many PPID horses have a secondary IR, driven by the PPID.  With these horses, one needs to be cautious because that insulin response may be the tipping point into laminitis.

And, alfalfa may simply be a trigger for laminitis in some horses that have an allergy to it.  I had a mare that couldn't eat it, period.

All that said, if an owner knows what their IR or PPID horse can tolerate, and you have a product that lists its starch guarantee (not just the word 'safe'), then feed what works for you.  My horses, including two IR and two PPID, all get alfalfa pellets as a means to balance the calcium for their diets.  I also use a low carb feed that is very similar the Haystack's product.

Linda
EC Primary Response
West Coast
May 2004


---In EquineCushings@..., <carolynwahlfeld@...> wrote :

Just wanted to ask why your horses can't have alfalfa.  I understand that Alfalfa is good for Cushings