Taking Control of the Trim -- You can do this. #understandingtrim


Nancy C
 

Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks.  
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break. 
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


Hedy Sladovich
 

Hi Mancy

Hi Nancy,

Thank you. I am a lurker and would find a hoof trimming guide very useful. 

I think I would understand the terminology better if I took a beginner from class. Any recommendations? 

Online might be best to start
but I need to start from the beginning rather than keep dropping in on the middle of a conversation. 

Thankfully, Hedy

(Who does NOT have a case file, but has a chubby Icelandic gelding) whose diet is difficult to manage in a  boarding situation and found the emergency diet helpful in more than one occasion.

Sent from my iphone.


On Nov 19, 2018, at 9:04 AM, Nancy C <threecatfarm@...> wrote:

Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks.  
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break. 
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


Lorna Cane
 

On Mon, Nov 19, 2018 at 09:21 AM, Hedy Sladovich wrote:
I need to start from the beginning rather than keep dropping in on the middle of a conversation. 
Hi Hedy,

One thing I find very useful ,when trying to follow conversations,or even just one person in particular,is to use the More button, beside the Like button ,below messages.
That allows you to read all the messages by the person who posted the message on that page.
A person whose messages i like to follow is Lavinia,in order to learn more about hoof trimming. Her info is invaluable,for new trimmers as well as the more experienced.
It's not in 1.,2.,3....fashion. But there is a wealth of knowledge wedged in between,which we don't have access to in a 1.,2.,3.....format.
Happy reading.
 
--

Lorna in Eastern Ontario, Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/PPID%20and%20IR%20Success%20Stories/Success%20Story%20%233%20-%20Lorna%20and%20Ollies%20Story.pdf

 


Jon and Heather Fowler
 

Nancy, please give my thanks to Lavinia.  I can't even express how grateful I am for her many, many, many hours of work and for her patience and knowledge.

I am glad she is taking a much needed break and hope she does actually get to rest.  🌻

I've been thinking about this for a while...  Is there a way to send something to the volunteers without having to publish their personal addresses online?  I owe a huge debt of gratitude to this group and specifically to Dr. Kellon, Dr. Clougher and Lavinia and would love to do something nice for them.

Thanks,


On Mon, Nov 19, 2018, 7:04 AM Nancy C <threecatfarm@... wrote:
Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks.  
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break. 
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


--
Heather Fowler, DVM   January 2015   New River, AZ

 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Heather%20and%20Marra%20-%20Queenie/Marra

Marra's photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6013


Jon and Heather Fowler
 

Oops!  Sorry for including your first post in my reply.  
--
Heather Fowler, DVM   January 2015   New River, AZ

 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Heather%20and%20Marra%20-%20Queenie/Marra

Marra's photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6013


Bonnie
 

Nancy wrote: " Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses" I am one.

Some list members, like me, live in a "non-horsey" region and have few of any neighbours to consult. Others may have conflicting advice coming from different people, all the way from "What do you mean? Those feet are fine. I've been doing this for twenty years, little lady, and you can't believe any old thing you read on the internet." to " Just put him down. There are plenty of other horses out there."
We readers all owe a great debt to Lavinia, and those who did that blessed work before her. Cheers to all who are making it possible for her to have a break.


--
Bonnie and Lad
North Ontario
Dec 2008
 


kimgedckewagner
 

Well written Nancy!
Kim & color guard (over the bridge)
Winter 2005

On Mon, Nov 19, 2018, 9:05 AM Nancy C <threecatfarm@... wrote:
Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks.  
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break. 
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


Carol Grubb <headmare0@...>
 

Right on!  I cannot imagine how much time all of the volunteers spend doing this amazing feat for all of us!   You are all VERY much appreciated and many many horses, several of my own, would not have had a path to recovery without the support and information from this group.  A big Thank You for all you do and Lavinia, go away, unplug your computer and have some fun.   
--
Carol 
Tucson AZ
2012
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=71740 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Carol%20and%20RIver


 

Hedy, here you are! Go through the various pages on this site, and you will be well on your way:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/  

Also, I can't recommend highly enough this book:  https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Hoof-Book-Diagnosis-Treatment/dp/1570767327   

And, of course, Pete's book, and his DVD's:  http://www.hoofrehab.com/  
--
Jaini Clougher (BSc, BVSc)
Merlin (over the bridge), Maggie, Gypsy, Ranger
BC 09
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy .
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=34193.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=39711


Shannon
 

❤️❤️❤️ ALL my love to y’all!  Amazing hard work.  I should get a working computer before the end of the year.  Until then, just want to let everyone know that Majik is doing fabulous with a great farrier and on the spot diet/supplements. 
Much love from Shannon McCullough

On Nov 19, 2018, at 8:04 AM, Nancy C <threecatfarm@...> wrote:

Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks.  
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break. 
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


--
Shannon and Majik (IR) and Rafiq (PPID/IR, over the rainbow bridge)
Houston 2009

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Shannon%20and%20Majik%20and%20Rafiq

Majik's Photo Album

Rafiq's Photo Album


Lynn
 

Hi Nancy – I wanted to make sure you got my email about Relevante’s hoof photos and the invites to the dropbox folders. Thanks!! Lynn
 

From: Nancy C
Sent: Monday, November 19, 2018 9:04 AM
Subject: [ECIR] Taking Control of the Trim -- You can do this.
 
Many of our members read the forum every day to learn more to support the health of their horses. If that’s you, then you may have noticed two things:
 
(1) All our volunteers are dedicating most of their free time to help you.
 
and
 
(2) Trim is a huge component that needs to be dealt with to be successful in rehab.
 
You may have also noticed that Lavinia has been working well beyond overtime helping folks understand what is needed for their ongoing hoof care.
 
Because she needs a break, we’re asking Lavinia to hold off on doing any more mark-ups, starting today, until into the new year. During this time she will be putting together a trim program to make sure new folks are guided and all of us continue to learn what we must to help our own horses.
 
Here’s what you can do in the meanwhile:
• Keep breathing.
• Take digital photos of your horse’s feet as ECIR recommends.
 
• Load them on your computer or phone, or print them out to study.
• Use the following resources to help train your eye:
All the archived trim evaluations and mark-ups.  There are many to be learned from.
 
• Proceedings from the 2013, 2015 and 2017 (soon to be released)  NO Laminitis! Conference on ecirhorse.org
• If you don’t know about Druid, you may find this case history to be helpful, uplifting even:  http://www.ironfreehoof.com/severe-laminitis-case-study.html
• Mark where you think the trim needs to go.
• Review with your hoof pro, or have at it if you are trimming yourself.
• Observe and make notes on how your horse responds.
• Post specific questions on what you have seen to the group.

Remember one way or another, the work has to be done over time to bring the horse back to a physiologically correct foot. This takes not only growing good laminae connection but also rebuilding the hind end (caudal) of the foot.

Taking a little foot more often - even every two or three days — allows your horse to adjust more slowly and gives you more opportunity to train your eye. At a minimum, a rotated or distal descent foot needs to be trimmed every two to three weeks. 
 
Thanks for your help and for giving Lavinia a break.
 
You can do this.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


--
Lynn
Beavercreek, Ohio
March 2018
Relevante Case History
Relevante Photo Album

Ω


Nancy C
 

Yes. Hi Lynn. I have the email.

Mant thanks. 
--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

 


 

Hi, Heather - I have to say, and I think this goes for all of the volunteers, that the best reward is seeing people follow the protocols, and getting their horses to improve. And when they are tough or complicated cases, it is even more rewarding for us to see the owners digging really deep to figure out what is going on, and how best to deal with it. So, here is my heartfelt thanks to all those hard-working owners out there!
--
Jaini Clougher (BSc, BVSc)
Merlin (over the bridge), Maggie, Gypsy, Ranger
BC 09
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy .
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=34193.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=39711


Cindy Q
 

Totally indebted to Lavinia and many other volunteers and members here especially Dr Kellon and Dr Jaini. Always studying all the helpful advice they tirelessly give to other members as well as there is so much gold in there!

I actually bought that Essential Hoof book, lent it to my regular younger vet the day I got it and she hasn't returned it since! But I'm happy she shares my passion for hooves. With the encouragement and comments from Lavinia, I have found my trimming/rasping between farrier visits has helped our pony's progress. Just last week I had returned from a hoof course in Melbourne, Australia, found my farrier had gone away and Glow's feet were cracking and overdue. Instead of being stressed and worried, I got to work right away and she looked instantly better. Just this morning, I ordered Pete's first dvd set Under the Horse! Lavinia has been a real inspiration! There is so much to learn but it can have a real positive effect on the horse. I'm even doing touchups on our other ponies, the list is growing and I have seen the addition of the right minerals to the hay improve hoof quality all round!

--
Cindy - Sep 2017, Singapore


 

Cindy, thank you so much for this great update! I am doing the happy dance for you, and Glow, and all the other ponies - you rock!
--
Jaini Clougher (BSc, BVSc)
Merlin (over the bridge), Maggie, Gypsy, Ranger
BC 09
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy .
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=34193.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=39711


Sally Stults <jsstults@...>
 

Hi Nancy and all...  I know it would be easier said than done and may well be on your radar screen already....however wondered if it might be possible for ECIR to recruit a list of those trained in the ECIR philosophy of hoof trimming to list in the Getting Help section of the Files, much like the list of those who help with mineral balancing, who would be able to give feedback on hoof x-rays and photos on a fee basis.

If Lavinia was not available or backed up on being able to give feedback as quickly as an owner needed, they would have the option of turning to one of these people for advice on trimming their horse, and hopefully alleviate some of the pressure on Lavinia going forward.
--
Sally 04/2013

Big Park, Arizona

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sally%20with%20Tabby%20and%20Maisie 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78667




 


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

It's a little complicated but yes, we are working on it Sally. Are you volunteering?
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Sally,

It would be great to have more people versed in proper trim principles available to help those needing assistance - just haven't had much luck in finding them, even on a fee basis. Doesn't mean we've given up, however.

Evaluating trims and providing mark-ups takes several hours per horse and requires that someone can commit to some sort of a regular schedule. Unfortunately, due to the nature of trimming, anyone who makes their living at it spends a lot of time on the road so is likely not available on a regular basis, or has enough other demands on his/her "free time" that adding another obligation isn't feasible.

--
Lavinia and George Too
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
ECIR Support Team


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Thank-you, Cindy, for your kind words.

You have been a life-saver for Glow, and now with your expanding knowledge, are able to help even more equines - Way to go!

--
Lavinia and George Too
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
ECIR Support Team


Nancy C
 
Edited

Totally agree with Eleanor and Lavinia and wish to add that there is nothing that will focus your mind on this better than trying it yourself. If you are not picking up your own rasp, take lots of digital photos. You'll learn to get really good ones.  Then compare by going through the links laid out in this message:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/228968

Another really interesting source is the old yahoo ECHoof photos.  You'll need to join that group and then go to photos.  Choose to scroll through individual photos, aka photostream (versus albums).

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ECHoof/photos/photostream

You will find lots and lots of examples very likely very similar to your own situation.  If nothing else, you will begin to train your eye to have better conversation with your trimmer.  Nothing is faster than taking and looking at lots of digital photos.

Our goal is to teach each of you to assess this very important area of DDT+E.  It is the one area that most likely can and will trip you up going forward.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT