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Genetics of EMS #incretins

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

More evidence that EMS is inherited - from study of Welsh and Morgan horses:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30472742
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Jon and Heather Fowler
 

Awesome that research is documenting and explaining observed findings.  

When I heard Philip Johnson speak at this year's Wild West Veterinary Conference about enteroendocrine cells (EEC) and incretin production it made me wonder if eventually we will find that our EMS/IR/ID-prone horses have more enterendocrine cells than normal horses, or if their EECs produce higher incretin levels than normal horses and that is why we find breed and heredity behind so much of the EMS/IR/ID.  On the human side, there is research to develop meds that stimulate incretin production to raise endogenous insulin production in type II diabetics.  One of these days, we may have meds on the equine veterinary side that decrease incretin production by EECs, lowering the amount of insulin the body releases in response to feed.

Exciting days ahead! 


--
Heather Fowler, DVM   January 2015   New River, AZ

 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Heather%20and%20Marra%20-%20Queenie/Marra

Marra's photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6013

Ginger Ritchey
 

Thanks for sharing Dr. Kellon. Have they done any research on the genetics for DSLD?

Ginger 


On Dec 3, 2018, at 4:08 PM, Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...> wrote:

More evidence that EMS is inherited - from study of Welsh and Morgan horses:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30472742
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

MPA Justa Tstar
 

There is also a study from Dr. Samantha Brooks at Florida University on Arabians that carry a EMS gene...

Unfortunately I do not have the link to the study results, however. 

Best,

Adrienne & PJ
Atlanta GA 


On Dec 3, 2018, at 5:08 PM, Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...> wrote:

More evidence that EMS is inherited - from study of Welsh and Morgan horses:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30472742
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

celestinefarm
 

Morgan breeders for almost two centuries have selected for the "thrifty " gene trait.  Personally, I take exception to the term used in the study "disorder".
 
What the study is implying( and it's retrospective, which I have always  been taught to be suspect of) is that Welsh Ponies and Morgan horses have an inheritable disorder( laypeople will translate that to disease) which means should be either trait selected in future breedings to eliminate( would take cross breeding out to 'non disordered breeds, thereby eliminating the breed itself) or people should be choosing alternative breeds who don't have this "disorder".
While I don't, as a Morgan breeder, disagree with the study findings itself, I seriously disagree with the term "disorder". 
 
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Yes, but no conclusive answers for DSLD yet.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

It's interesting that the increased incretin release has only been documented in one pony study. For example, Dr. Chameroy's thesis work found no difference in GLP-1 release in response to Karo in EMS vs normal horses:

https://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=2019&context=utk_graddiss


Another huge problem with focusing on suppression of incretin release is that these ponies, and maybe Andalusians, seem to be overabsorbing glucose compared to other horses. That would make a higher incretin response totally normal and appropriate. It also makes sense because if the incretin response was higher than needed for the glucose the end result would be hypoglycemia.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I agree, Dawn. I try to get people to look at as similar to allergy, not a disease. If you have an allergy to a certain food, you have to avoid it. Same for too much sugar and starch in an EMS prone breed. The other HUGE factor is exercise. These animals need to be worked.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

celestinefarm
 

"The other HUGE factor is exercise. These animals need to be worked"

Absolutely correct.  The American Morgan Horse Association states emphatically in it's introduction to the breed literature it dispenses at places like the Kentucky Horse Park for those new to the breed that Morgan's need to less food, very little to no grain and work to remain the healthy breed they are.

--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

 

Is it OK to post this on my Facebook page? I have a client who is refusing to believe that her little Welsh pony could be IR. I could also just post it on her page, if you thought that was better. 

Unless it’s even better to make an ECIR page post out of it?


On Dec 3, 2018, at 2:08 PM, Eleanor Kellon, VMD <drkellon@...> wrote:

More evidence that EMS is inherited - from study of Welsh and Morgan horses:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30472742
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Post it as many places as you like!
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I'm adding to this thread from earlier in the month because there is another negative study regarding incretin. 16 ponies of various breeds were classified as normal, moderate or high insulin responders and  their insulin levels when grazing were studied.  Insulin did parallel sugar intake in all groups but incretin was the same.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jvim.15363
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

celestinefarm
 

Dr. Kellon, I'm a little confused. This study appeared to show that while insulin levels increased in grazing ponies, the hormones in the gut that in humans, signal when there is food present for release of insulin from the beta cells in the pancreas, doesn't increase.  Which would be desirable in horses, as it is too much insulin, not glucose that is correlated with a risk of laminitis, correct? In other words, the last thing we would want in horses is to increase the incretin hormones. That also means that using the same human drugs to increase incretin in horses would be contraindicated?
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Let me back up a bit. Prior studies have found evidence of abnormally high insulin response to oral glucose but not when given IV, and high incretin levels to go along with that. However, other work subsequently has not been able to reproduce those results. The thought originally was that rather than being IR, they had an exaggerated incretin release causing the high insulin. It was also found high incretin individuals had absorbed more glucose, which makes the higher incretin and insulin possibly entirely appropriate.

In the study just posted, incretin did increase with feeding but with no difference between horses with normal or high insulin levels.

This is different from the human situation where a low incretin response can be involved in insufficient insulin release and high blood sugar.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

celestinefarm
 

Thanks, that makes that clearer. 
 
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History