learning to file hooves yourself #understandingtrim


Bonnie
 

There has been some discussion of getting brave and filing hooves when a trimmer is unavailable or uncooperative. Buying a rasp is an important step. The local feed and tack store may carry a really inferior product. I wasted a lot of time with files that weren't sharp enough.** A poor tool will make you think you are incompetent and will never be able to trim**.

This rasp, the Heller Black Master, is an example of a good one: 
http://www.profarriersupply.com/index.php?category_id=271&page=shop.product_details&product_id=3460&Itemid=138&option=com_virtuemart&vmcchk=1&Itemid=138
No, I do not get paid to suggest this product. Wish I did.

"If, when you look at your rasp at an angle in the light, you see a bright highlight on the tip if each tooth, your rasp is too worn. It should be replaced". This was a valuable tip that sent me shopping for a new one. A quality file lasts much longer than the feed and tack store variety, also has a more aggressive cutting ability than the cheap kind. Look up "farrier supplies" online for good brands.

We want our animals to have good hoof quality but groan when those feet seem to be diamond-hard. How wonderful mild snowy winter days are for hoof trims! My pony comes in with nice soft hooves and even a feeble old fibromyalgia lady can get results filing them. But dry summer heat makes hooves like stone. So I put a plastic bag over each hoof, put the hoof boots on over them, and pour warm water into each bag. Pony stands eating from a hay net, and after 20 minutes or so the hooves are less difficult to file. The feet are taken out of the bag/boot one at a time so they do not dry out before filing. It is easier to keep up if a little filing is done frequently, rather than doing all 4 feet at once.

Gloves are important, as they help your grip, and protect you from the inevitable scrape from your tools. My hands are very weak, but work gloves with a rubber coating give a better grip. You may prefer leather.

Having a tetanus shot might be a good idea.
Hope this encourages someone!
--
Bonnie and Lad
North Ontario
Dec 2008
 


 

Great post, Bonnie - thank you!

It can also work in summer to put on whatever hoof boots you have, and a pad, and fill those with water. Even if the water runs out (as it does with most boots), enough stays in to soften the feet.

I like the bag idea, though, as it seems easier. I will try that next summer!
--
Jaini Clougher (BSc, BVSc)
Merlin (over the bridge), Maggie, Gypsy, Ranger
ECIR mod/support, BC 09
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy .
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=34193.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=39711


Maxine McArthur
 

Thanks Bonnie. I have been struggling with hard hooves and an old rasp--you have inspired me to order a new one.
In summer I have sometimes hosed the feet then put on boots with pads, then go for a ride--the feet seem a bit softer when you take the boots off after the ride. On the other hand, after a ride in summer I'm usually too hot and tired to contemplate trimming.  You know it's hot when...you could probably heat-fit Easyboot Gloves just by leaving them in the sun all day! 

Just another plug for Pete Ramey's DVD set. I put off buying it because it is expensive (I can't rent it from here), but this Christmas I bought it for myself--TOTALLY worth the money. I will be re-watching it multiple times. Many, many useful hints for owner-trimmers. 

--
Maxine and Indy (PPID)

Canberra, Australia 2010

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Maxine%20and%20Indy

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=933

 


KAREN MANUEL
 

I have bought supplies from this website.  Their customer service is outstanding!  And they advocate natural trimming - so they "get it." http://www.star-ridge.com/index.html 

At the very beginning, I bought Diamond brand nippers from Tractor Supply. Joan Adams let me use her Nordic Forge ones while she coached me, I immediately bought those!

I too have a Heller rasp (the Legend, I think) - big difference there too!
--
Karen M.
Eastern CT
1/2/2019


Lorna Cane
 
Edited

Bellota Classic is another good rasp.
--

Lorna , Kingston, Ontario, Canada
ECIR Moderator 2002
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/PPID%20and%20IR%20Success%20Stories/Success%20Story%20%233%20-%20Lorna%20and%20Ollies%20Story.pdf

 


Shevawn Romine
 

I bought a rasp,   but my trimmer did not want me to do anything in between as she could no longer see the "wear" patterns if I did.  
--
Cassie and Shevawn
03/2015   Gordon, TX
CH folder:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Shevawn%20and%20Cassie 
Photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=76832


celestinefarm
 

My personal favorite is Exim rasps. Very aggressive cut, which is great for those of us without herculean strength. 
Couple words of advice for those just starting out rasping.  1. Gloves are mandatory. Choose whatever material you want, but you have to wear them. 2.  Another must is a screw on handle to cover the pointed tang of the rasp, this is a safety issue and adds tremendous comfort.  3. Buy a quality rasp and don't try to force it. Use the less aggressive side first until you get the feel of rasping. Heavier pressure only makes it harder and doesn't take material off.  4. Do one full stroke in one direction at a time, lift the rasp off the foot and look at what you just took off. Don't start sawing back and forth with a rasp. 5. Use a hoof stand( I use a hoof jack) or at least get down on one knee and put the foot on your other knee. You won't do that for long on concrete, but I guarantee you won't rasp for long with a foot being held up by one hand and then trying to put it on your thigh. 6. If you decide to do some regular rasping, invest in a pair of farrier chaps. The first time you run a rasp across your jeans or riding breeches, you'll appreciate chaps.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History


celestinefarm
 

Forgot the Exim link
https://eximrasps.com/rasps/
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History


Cindy Q
 

I'm using Bassoli Blade and it's good
Also it's available on amazon for cheaper shipping than many farrier online shops that charge 10usd flat rate. So worth looking at if you only need 1 item (plus you can choose ecir to benefit from the amazon Smile program) 

https://smile.amazon.com/Bassoli-Blade-14-Hoof-Rasp/dp/B0756MKXP1/

What I find is using a light touch to pass the rasp over the hoof is more effective /flows better than digging in or bearing down with too much pressure (tends to catch). Start with the finer side first and buy gloves. Try both sides to compare, i actually switch back and forth a lot. This rasp has a fine side that shaves. 

--
Cindy - Sep 2017, Singapore


hinecedark
 

I agree with all the good advice that has been offered here already. But I would add that whatever good rasp you use it will benefit, and last longer, if cleaned and oiled after each use. Use the brush of a hoof pick (dry) to remove all hoof and dirt from the rasp, then spray lightly with WD-40 before putting away in a place away from humidity. I thought the light oiling eased use, as well. My rasps customarily last a year as good as new trimming two horses and a mini.

Melinda
IN  2010


Heidi Wright
 


--
Heidi Wright
joined Aug 15, 2018
5130 State Route 38
Malta, IL  60150
815-761-2341

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Heidi%20and%20Skyler 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=69604


Heidi Wright
 

You can also get the Exim rasps on Amazon and if you are a prime member the shipping is free.  I just bought one for $24 delivered.

--
Heidi Wright
joined Aug 15, 2018
5130 State Route 38
Malta, IL  60150
815-761-2341

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Heidi%20and%20Skyler 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=69604


christinecull33
 

Hi there, I've decided I'm going to take on trimming my Minnie's feet as well.  I have a herd of 5, so probably I will trim my Minnie at the 3 week mark, and then have the farrier do the 6 week trim for everyone including Minnie. (plus she can keep an eye on what I'm doing! lol).  I spoke with my farrier this am, and she was completely in support of the idea.   

Although I have her support, I am also interested in the Pete Ramey Video tutorial. Can anyone recommend which dvd set to purchase?  there are a few on his website.  Or if there is an alternate tutorial which is recommended, would be interested as well.  Any series on Youtube?

thanks all! 
--
Chris
July 29, 2017, Belleville, Ontario
Minnie Case history link; https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Chris%20and%20Minnie

Minnie Photo Album;   
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=8561


 

Thanks Bonnie and all respondents!! Great information.  I hope to be able to fashion some sort of bag setup so that my herd of 3 can have mini soaks prior to my trimmers next visit.  Its mid summer here - roasting hot and dry - and these tips will be much appreciated by her.

Happy New Year ;-)
--

Sandra Weston

Joined 6/7/2016

Leeton, NSW, Australia

Case Histories:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sandra%20and%20Molly

  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sandra%20and%20Capri

Molly’s Photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=4424

Capri's Photos: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=4441

 

 

 


Cindy Q
 

Hi Chris

I bought the dvd set myself but I'm only on dvd 4 still haha.

I suggest the following (which are not answering your specific question sorry but I find helped me):
1) video your trimmer doing the trim if she allows. Or at least video the foot that she thinks needs the most work everytime. The video also allows you to study her posture and technique regarding how she handles the hoof/rasp etc.
2) Take clear photos right after the trimmer is done with the various ECIR angles (and if it's meant to be ground level, get the camera down to the ground and do not go in too close or the sides of the picture can be distorted (this is a technical issue with how camera lense and focus length work). These are useful as a reference and will help you recognise the imbalances and distortions as they start creeping in.
3) Be conservative when you work. After you trim, take photos again and study them (try to take them at about the same distance always for better comparison).
5) The next week, you can touch up more based on your own analysis of your photos. It could be minor or only on a particular foot.

Good luck!
--
Cindy - Sep 2017, Singapore


christinecull33
 


Cindy Q
 

Hi Chris

I should also mention that I am contemplating getting the book even though I have the dvds. So far I think the DVDs are good because of the visual aids when explaining things. As Pete is talking, you can see the matching visual aid or pictures that he is drawing at the same time. In a book, you would have to keep looking for the right figure no. to compare. Also, I got them because I wanted to see the live trims and issues they addressed but I haven't gotten to there yet. But after understanding what is taught, if you are looking for a reference back, I think it might be easier to use a book because it is easier to bookmark out particular sections and also to flip through looking for something. Now when I want to check something I think I watched before, I have to change the DVDs and skip through them and its not so easy to find them. So it depends on which you need more and your preferred style of learning/reference.
--
Cindy - Sep 2017, Singapore