Do some horses never regain their appetite after starting Prascend?


 

I just got a message from a riding school to which I had donated an insulin resistant Fjord mare.  She was around 13 when a donated her.  She is now 23, and they were planning on putting her down yesterday, and I imagine it was done.  I was told that she was never able to tolerate even 1, mg of Prascend without going completely off her food.  It appears they kept her going in an untreated state for a while (there are pictures of her on the website with long leg hair and a shaven body).  I was told that she had been to UC Davis Vet School in July for a bone infection that they had been "chasing" until January, and that she was in pain from laminitis "setting in."  There was not really much I felt I could do under the circumstances, but I am wondering if there really are horses that are simply unable to tolerate Prascend.  I have no idea what they did or did not try, and I am likely to get push back if I get too insistent.   It would be good to know if I should have said,  "Well, there is no such thing as a horse that cannot tolerate Prascend"  If so, I guess it might have been worthwhile to say, "Send her  to me, and I can fix a six month old bone infection, get her on  Prascend, and beat back the laminitis."  

She was a very, very sweet mare.  They once asked me if she had ever had any foals as they would purchase them if they were available.  I do not think they gave up on her easily, but  maybe the protocols worked out by ECIR would have helped a difficult case.  She apparently stopped eating all food.
--
Gail Russell 8/30/2008

 

 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Gail%20and%20Brother%20-%20Odin%20-%20Decaffe%20%20-Gunthar .


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I understand, but it's really pointless and also unfair to try to second guess this situation without knowing all the day to day details and having actually been there. It may have been possible to get her to tolerate the Prascend (although can't rule out there being individuals that  just can't no matter what), but osteomyelitis - bone infection - is extremely serious and not easily fixed. In people, the preferred treatment is amputation. Don't beat yourself up, or condemn them. Be kind to each other and celebrate what a good horse she was.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


 

Yes, I agree that I should not condemn them.  I could have protested and tried to do something, but figured the bone infection really was going to be determinative anyway.  If not for that, I might have tried to stop the euthansia.  They went above and beyond to send her to Davis.  One usually does not get out of there without a $1500 bill.  I thanked them for taking such good care of her, and acknowledged that there was nothing to be done.  I did say, as tactfully as I could, say that there might be something they could try to deal with appetite issues in the way of using APF and careful titrating if they have a similar problem in the future.  

--
Gail Russell 8/30/2008

 

 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Gail%20and%20Brother%20-%20Odin%20-%20Decaffe%20%20-Gunthar .


Sherry Morse
 

Gail,

I'm so sorry to read this but as Dr. K already said there's really no point in doing 'what if's' at this point, especially if she had osteomyelitis as well. At least they tried to do everything they could and let you know what was going on, which is more than some places can manage.