Topics

3/4 inch vs 1 inch hay bag hokes

 

Time to buy a couple of new hay nets and I keep going back and forth between 3/4 inch and 1 inch.

Currently I have both. My horses can finish 8 pounds of hay in the 1 inch bag in 10 hrs (overnight). In 10 hours in the 3/4 inch bag they still have a tiny bit left of the 8 pounds.

Is slower better or is there such a thing as too slow?
--
Amber, Calliber and now Marquise
Upstate SC
Joined in 2019

NRCPlus Jan 2019
CIR 2019
DEW 2019

Calliber Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Amber%20and%20Calliber
Calliber Photos https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=82557

Marquise's Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Amber%20and%20Marquise
Marquise's Photos https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=91447

Kirsten Rasmussen
 

I think slower is better.  My horse can eat his 10 lbs of overnight hay in 4 hrs from a "slow feed" net with 1" holes unless I take measures to slow him down.  I find 3/4" holes are much harder for him and he actually leaves a bit too much behind.   So I use 1" and try to get creative with how I set it out for him.  A big thing is he likes to shake the net to get the hay out, so if I fasten the net down he can't shake it.  I also have one hay net set up that's harder to eat from than the other, so once he's done his 'easy' hay he spends a few hours working on the more difficult hay....there is almost always a small handful left in the more difficult net, so I know it's not too hard for him.

"Too slow" is if you find there's lots of hay left and your horses have given up in frustration, or ripped holes in your hay net.

I hope that helps!

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album   

Lorna Cane
 

Don't be surprised ,Kirsten, when he learns to paw at the net, if it is against a wall of any sort. Pawing works almost as well as shaking....ask me how I know this....for some of our more creative critters.

--

Lorna Cane
Ontario, Canada
2002


 

 

Mine shake the bags, anything wrong with that?
--
Amber, Calliber and now Marquise
Upstate SC
Joined in 2019

NRCPlus Jan 2019
CIR 2019
DEW 2019

Calliber Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Amber%20and%20Calliber
Calliber Photos https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=82557

Marquise's Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Amber%20and%20Marquise
Marquise's Photos https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=91447

Lorna Cane
 

Hi Amber,

For me it means they don't take as long to get what they want, as when they have to pick the hay through the holes.

--

Lorna Cane
Ontario, Canada
2002


 

Kirsten Rasmussen
 

That's right, they can empty a hay net incredibly quickly if it can be shaken, especially if the hay is shorter stemmed or chopped, like mine is this year.  I also find they shake out all the good bits (leaves), eat that first, then tackle the stemmy bits left behind in the hay net.  I prefer my horse to eat a mix of both because his hay tests are based on a mix...it could be either the stems or leaves are higher in sugar, giving him more sugar at once than the hay test suggests.  Plus concentrated stemmy hay gives him diarrhea.

I used to attach my hay net tightly to the top and bottom of a post, which worked well when it was longer stem hay.  Fortunately I've never seen him paw at it, but don't give him any ideas Lorna!  Now that his hay is chopped I have it fastened tightly to the bottom of a bin that's too small to shake the hay net around in, and that collects what does fall out of the net.  I'm always experimenting with different ways to feed though, and slow him down, it's kind of a game!  This chopped hay is a challenge, that's for sure!  Lol

K
--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album