Does Rinsing hay lower any nutrients besides IRON?


 

Subject line says it all. I am going to send a rinsed/dried hay sample to EQ for iron testing. Is there any other nutrients/minerals that are reduced by rinsing? Nitrates?

Hay was sent previously to EQ for wet chem testing. ESC/starch levels good but the iron level prompts me to do this rinsed test.

Plan:

1.Rinse "whole" composite hay sample the same way I rinse all of his hay, same length of time.

2. Dry hay before cutting to short length (stainless steel scissors) required for testing. I decided to NOT core hay and rinse the short pieces because that may give different test results than the long hay he actually is fed.

Question 1: Any reason to do this rinsing/drying/cutting in a different way?

Question 2: Is there any other nutrient or mineral lowered by rinsing?


I rinse all my horse's hay prior to feeding anyway for respiratory issues. 
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- Bonnie 07-2016

Charles County, Maryland

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


 

That sounds like an excellent plan. Rinsing might lower the potassium a smidge (but not much); rinsing is mostly to get rid of surface contamination. Nitrates are mostly within the hay (except for surface contamination from sprayed fertilizer etc), so one needs to soak to reduce nitrates.
--

Jaini Clougher (BSc,BVSc)

Merlin (over the bridge) ,Maggie,Gypsy, Ranger

BC 09
ECIR mod/support

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy




 

Hi, Bonnie.

I soaked and rinsed for a year and a half and compared dry hay samples with soaked and rinsed sample. It's a bit complicated. The hotter, more pure and more acid your water, the more minerals you will leach out along with ESC by soaking and rinsing

Soaking and rinsing removes ESC but not starch. The amount removed depends on how hot the water, how long you soak,  how much you rinse, and how pure your water is.

It can also dissolve a lot of surface iron and, if not rinsed really extensively, actually increases the iron available in your hay.

It can reduce calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and phosphorus. The purer your water, the more of these major minerals will leach out.

If your water is from a municipal water source, ask for an analysis, which the provider is required to supply under federal law. If your water if from a well, try to get an idea of the pH of the water. 

--
Cass for Satra and Cayuse
Sonoma County, Calif. Oct. '12

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cass%20and%20Satra%20-%20Cayuse


 

Thank you Cass and Jaini for replies. I only need to rinse my newest hay. The ESC = 4.4%, Starch = .1%, but the Iron = 376 ppm. I am sending a rinsed and dried sample to EA for another Iron test so I can get the mineral balanced correctly. Guess I'll just order the Iron test.

I RINSE only, all hay fed to Mouse as he has respiratory problems and I want to lower the iron level. I am consistant on how I rinse the hay.

I do think a well water test would be a good idea. Our well water comes from a deep aquafer.

I do have a handful of bales of untested hay that I do 1 hour cold water soaks on while I slowly use them up. These are some "sample" bales of a Teff hay that I decided to NOT purchase/test. It is way over mature, straw like, but works as a keep busy hay.


- Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

Charles County, Maryland

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


 

On Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 04:53 am, Bonnie Snodgrass wrote:

I RINSE only, all hay fed to Mouse as he has respiratory problems and I want to lower the iron level. I am consistant on how I rinse the hay.

Bonnie, I would really like to read your results from rinsing only. Somewhere I got the impression that to reduce dust and molds for respiratory problems, a 30 minute soak is recommended. Please don't take it from me. Others here know much more about that than I.

I never saw a reduction in iron using my water, but then I always soaked for a short period of time.  I look forward to reading your results with how long you rinsed and how much water you used per volume of hay.

--
Cass for Satra and Cayuse
Sonoma County, Calif. Oct. '12

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cass%20and%20Satra%20-%20Cayuse


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Cass,

I have one result for a hay of mine which I had tested for iron and sodium before and after just rinsing. I know that a lot of the iron is from dirt on the surface.

I  cored samples of the hay and sent one sample just the way it was: iron 246 ppm, sodium .214%

From the same bucket of cored hay I rinsed a sample - just dumped a quart of it into a bucket of clean, cold water, swished it around then pulled back out using a strainer. Air dried well, then sent in: iron 177 ppm, sodium .146%.

I have tested well water, treated to keep pH neutral.

Didn't test anything else.
--
Lavinia, Dante and George Too

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


 

I have to borrow a hay probe to core hay for testing. Lavinia told me she always saves some cored hay when she is testing her hays in case she wants to have an additional test done at a later time. Good Idea! I sent my hay test off  and didn't say a sample. So for the 2nd test of "rinsed" hay I decided to  send a sample of hay rinsed exactly as I actually rinse my hays. I took a hay sample from multiple bales, not cored, packed it into one of my "Mini" hay nets and rinsed. I use cold water from our well. I have a nice deep tub that allows he to imerse hay nets fully. (The tub is scrubbed 1-2xday) I use a manual clothes plunger/wand on each hay net and REALLY vigorusly work each net of hay up and down. www.easygoproducts.com/easygo-washing-wand.html. Here is a link to the manual washer I use. They work really well to wash and rinse anything including hay! It also works for washing horse bandages and saddle pads. I used an old metal version of this kind of plunger back when I groomed race horses at the tracks. Much easier and more efficient for hay rinsing than other method I tried early on and it aloows you to keep you hands out of the water.

I dried the hay over a few days then reduced it in size for shipping to the lab. We'll see what the new iron test shows. 

I have found that rinsing my horse's hay for dust and mold spores works fine. He is heavey and reacts to inhaling dust and spores. Just rinsing has been working REALLY WELL. If I have a hay that isn't tested low ECS/starch I soak it for an hour in cold water then give it a quick plunging before draining.


 


--
- Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

Charles County, Maryland

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


Sharon Manning
 

Do you think the same happens in steamed hay? I am steaming hay but did not change my copper or zinc, so I may be giving too much.
Thanks sharon
2005
E TN

Sent from my iPhone
Please forgive any errors


 

I believe the purpose of steaming is to dampen the hay placed into the steamer so that dusts and fine mold particle/spors are not inhaled by the horse eating the hay. Rinsing achieves removing suface dust/particles and evidently surface iron and dampens the hay. Lot cheaper for me to do then $1000 for a steamer. If I lived in a colder climate I might think differently. 

http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/horse/nutrition/the-effect-of-hay-steaming-on-forage-nutritive-values/index.html
--
- Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

Charles County, Maryland

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


celestinefarm
 

Sharon, I have a Haygain steamer and it does not reduce the mineral content of the hay. It also doesn't reduce sugar or starch content, it simply kills mold spores and "freshens" the hay, reduces dust, etc. Good for respiratory problems, but not the solution for high iron, or Sugar/Starch.  Their literature states the above.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History


Sharon Manning
 

Thanks dawn
I am steaming for a horse with heaves. It's helped a great deal but not 100%. Also on Dr k protocol. I just saw the iron question and it made me wonder if I should test my steamed hay and adjust minerals.
Sharon
2005
E TN

Sent from my iPhone
Please forgive any errors