Mustang Roll


LeeAnne Bloye <ecir.archives@...>
 

Posted on behalf of Matthew and Charley:

It [Mustang Roll] was all the rage a few years ago but I haven't even hear it in some time.. Is that about what Lavinnia is talking about doing to certain degrees per the XRs.   How are the farriers to know how much to take off or not to take off without XRs???  The same 2 have been doing Charley and Moose therefore  I have to suspect that if C is long in the toe then Moose is also.  There is no way to tell if the sole/hoof wall/ground is parallel to the bone structure from the outside of the hoof. 

- Matthew and Charley
St. Augustine, FL
July 2017
--

- ​LeeAnne

ECIR Archivist, Newmarket, Ontario March 2004

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Paula Hancock
 

On Thu, Aug 3, 2017 at 12:09 pm, LeeAnne Bloye wrote:
There is no way to tell if the sole/hoof wall/ground is parallel to the bone structure from the outside of the hoof. 
Hi Matthew,
In Lavinia's message to you  she did a brief evaluation of Charley's trim based on a number of criterion that she uses to be able to tell what is going on with the internal structures. She will provide details after she does mark ups for the other people in line ahead of you.
You are right that radiographs give you more information, but if you follow certain external structures, you can deduce a lot about where the internal structures are currently and what the trim priorities are.  Without knowing and following those priorities, the trimming tends to follow the long toe out and let it get longer, which thins the sole and creates more pathology in the foot.  If you look at the lateral photos, you will see the top inch of hoof growth is at a steeper angle than the rest of the hoof wall as it approaches the ground.  If you draw a line using that top inch and extend it down to the ground, you will see where the hoof should break over.  Looking at the bottom of the foot, you can  evaluate the depth of the collateral grooves, which are the grooves on either side of the frog. If those are shallow, there is reason to think the bony column has sunk down relative to the hoof wall.  How Lavinia does that from a photo, I have no idea.  The sole photos show you where the sole is and where the stretched white line is.  The sole grows from the bottom of the coffin bone, the stretched white line/laminar wedge at the front is just how the horse fills in that extra space.  If you take photos of Moose's feet, you can also look at whether that top inch of hoof growth is at a different angle from that of the wall below.

Don't worry, you don't have to know all this to help your boy. Lavinia will give you guidelines so the trim can be improved to help Charley's feet heal.  
Keep up the good work!
--
Paula with Cory (IR) and Onyx (IR/PPID)

 

Bucks County, PA, USA

ECIR Primary Response

NRCplus 2011  ECIR 2014 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Cory

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1624

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Onyx

 


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Matthew,

Obviously, getting radiographs is the best way to know exactly where everything is located inside the hoof capsule. In their absence, however, there are a number of external landmarks that can be reliably used to determine a correct trimming strategy. Paula's already mentioned two of the most important: the angle of the new growth and the depth of the collateral grooves. The overall angle of the coronary band, the shape of the hoof wall, the position of the heels relative to the frog all provide clues to what is going on inside. The biggest missing link in using these landmarks is knowing what a healthy foot looks like so you can make comparisons. Unfortunately, pathological hoof form has become so pervasive that what is now generally seen as "normal" has very little to do with being healthy.

Here is some more in-depth discussion about collateral groove depth and using it to determine where to trim (and where NOT to trim):

http://www.hoofrehab.com/HorsesSole.html

Lots of other good, informative articles on Pete's site as well.

Another example of the parameters we look at is here:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/album?id=1106&p=pcreated,,,20,2,0,0

The Mustang Roll is an extensive bevel used to ease the break over. It's based on the way feral horses' feet naturally wear. It's useful when the trim is fairly tight and is another tool in the toolbox but won't solve the problem when there is just too much length at ground level.
--
Lavinia and George Too

Dante, Peanut, Nappi and George over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Meant to add that we trim and shoe horses feet all the time without using xrays as a guide. It's always based on using landmarks to tell us where internal structures are.

The problem has become that we tend to base the trim decisions on landmarks that are mobile, and therefore become deceptive, rather than on ones that are stationary and reliable.
--
Lavinia and George Too

Dante, Peanut, Nappi and George over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

EC Support Team