Comments needed for upcoming hoof trim


Sue Hansen
 

Dawn's new hoof photos are in her photo album.  Thank you for your help.
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Sue H.
June 2017. Markle, IN USA
Case History https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sue%20and%20Dawn  .
Dawn's photo album  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=9764


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Saw that Sue. I'll put something up later tonight.
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Lavinia and George Too

Dante, Peanut, Nappi and George over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

ECIR Support Team


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Sue,

I've added a couple of mark-ups to Dawn's album:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=9764&p=pcreated,,,20,2,0,0

The toes are still too long, heels underrun, all feet are medially high, which is at least part of the toeing in problem. I've marked up the radiographs as to what would have been the best thing to do but as I don't have pictures of the feet that correspond to the radiographs, it's a bit hard to discern exactly how the trim that was done correlates to them. The bony column alignment in the radiographs was fine on the RF, slightly broken forward on the LF (which means a slight bit of rotation). This means that wedges would have shifted the bony column out of alignment.

LF radiograph: Purple line shows where the bony column alignment should be - see how the bones bend slightly ahead of this. Where it hits the ground is where the breakover should be - any hoof capsule touching the ground ahead of this point will stop the bony column from breaking over when it should. Blue line is where the toe needs to be backed to. Green line is where the dorsal wall should align. Yellow circle surrounds fuzzy areas on the dorsl surfce of the coffin bone - ususally, this indicates inflammation and possible ringbone. The two orange lines are the same length - so there is extra sole depth. The lime line is where the trim on the bottom should have gone, removing some overall height but with slightly more from the back half of the foot than the front half (a wedge-shaped cut). The tack (dark red circle) marks the tip of the frog. The dark red arrow is where the true tip of the frog is actually located, so the frogs have stretched forward quite a bit.

RF radiograph: Same lines as the LF except that the bony column is well aligned and there are NO signs of ringbone. Because the bony column was well aligned, the foot should have been trimmed to keep the angle of the bottom the same as it was, just shorter in height (lime line runs parallel to the sole on the radiograph).

RF dorsal: The green line follows the angle of the new growth to the ground - note the flaring. The yellow line runs parallel to the height of the lateral wall so it highlights that the medial wall is too long. Getting this flaring controlled will help to keep the foot from being forced into a toed-in stance. If you have access to a good chiropractor, one who knows how to work the sesamoids, that would also be a help as many times the sesamoids will be locked, forcing the hoof to remain in an unnatural position.

RF lateral: The green line follows the angle of the new growth toward the ground. Blue lines are where the toe goes beyond the green line so needs to be removed to allow the breakover to be in the correct place.

RF sole: Green line is about where the actual hoof shape is. Blue hashes are the flared walls all around that need to be brought back and inward, then beveled under.

Same types of issues on the other three feet.
--
Lavinia and George Too

Dante, Peanut, Nappi and George over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

ECIR Support Team


Helen Temps
 

Lavinia  You commented  "The lime line is where the trim on the bottom should have gone, removing some overall height but with slightly more from the back half of the foot than the front half (a wedge-shaped cut".  I thought thick soles were good.  What problem is caused if they are too thick?  Just curious.  WIsh I had that problem, instead of too thin.  A little rasping and you're done!  Seems easier to correct. 


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Helen Temps and Chloe  June 2017
Placerville, CA
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Helen%20and%20Chloe.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=6929


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Proper sole thickness is great, excess is like walking around on platform shoes. It will compress the solar corium and and impede the hoof's ability to expand and contract as needed for proper function. Plus, it makes for clumsier movement.

You are correct that it's much easier to work with excess sole depth than with thin soles, esp. if you need to make angle corrections.

--
Lavinia and George Too

Dante, Peanut, Nappi and George over the Bridge

Jan 05, RI

ECIR Support Team